The Scripps Society Celebrated The Moody Foundation’s Announcement Of A $12M Gift To CRI With Dinner And A Very Special Singer

While Kathy and Harlan Crow were in Washington, D.C., they left “the key under the mat” for The Scripps Society’s annual dinner on Tuesday, October 24.

For newcomers, The Scripps Society was named after Debbie and Ric Scripps, who “have embodied the Children’s Medical Center mission.” It’s made up of people who have provided one million dollars or more for the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern, better known as CRI.

Sean Morrison, Christopher Durovich, Francie Moody-Dahlberg, Kevin Dahlberg and Brent Christopher

But on this occasion, Children’s Medical Center Foundation President Brent Christopher and Children’s Health CEO Christopher Durovich had a breathtaking surprise for the group whose funds had generously supported pediatric healthcare.

Following dinner in the Crow Library, it was announced that The Moody Foundation had gifted a whopping $12M for CRI.

Jamie Williams and Ralph DeBerardinis

Despite having coordinated the arrangement of the gift, Foundation Human Resources Director/Regional Grant Director for North Texas Jamie Williams admitted that it had been quite an undertaking, but well worth it. Thanks to the gift, CRI will be able to “attract the world’s top scientists to Dallas to work alongside other researchers at CRI and will fuel their research for the next decade.”

As for Moody Foundation Chair/Executive Director Francie Moody-Dahlberg and husband Kevin Dahlberg, they were amazed at the magnificence of the library. It was their first time to visit.

In the crowd were CRI’s Dr. Sean Morrison, Dr. Ralph DeBerardinis, Dr. Hao Zhu,Christina Durovich, Marnie and Kern Wildenthal, Sherry Vittrup and CRI’s Dr. Sean Morrison, Dr. Ralph DeBerardinis, and Dr. Hao Zhu.

Hao Zhu, Russell Vittrup and Sherry Vittrup

Another highlight of  the evening was Children’s patient Russell Vittrup‘s singing some “Old Blue Eyes” favorites. Having been diagnosed with leukemia his first  year in college, Russell’s story, like his singing, is mesmerizing.

Thanks to The Moody Foundation and the members of The Scripps Society, medical research is creating life-saving treatments and diagnoses for others like Russell.

JUST IN : Hamon Charitable Foundation Creates $10M Endowment For Laura And Jack Roach Center For Translational Research In Alzheimer’s

The late Nancy Hamon was a magnificent example of philanthropy. She lavished funds on various nonprofits from the arts to healthcare. Advising her over the years was attorney Jack Roach. Before she died in July  2011 at the age of 92, she established the Hamon Charitable Foundation to continue her philanthropic legacy. And, of course, Jack was a Foundation officer.

Laura and Jack Roach*

Today it was announced that the Foundation has created a $10M endowment “to support the new Laura and Jack Roach Center for Translational Research in Alzheimer’s Disease” at UT Southwestern. The endowment was establish to “honor the Roaches after Laura [Roach] was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.”

Thanks to the gift, UT Southwestern will be able research better ways to treat Alzheimer’s and “delay its onset from the laboratory into clinic practice.”

Hamon Charitable Foundation President Kelly Roach explained, “We’re hoping for a cure and that researchers can slow progression of the disease. We believe $10 million will get us a step closer in the right direction. It’s a difficult disease to watch – they call it ‘the long goodbye.’ We hope other families don’t have to experience what we’re experiencing.”

Daniel Podolsky (File photo)

While some consider Alzheimer’s to be an older person’s disease, its effect touches the patient’s family and friends of all ages.  Amazingly, 90% of the developments in diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s has been made in the past 20 years.

According to UT Southwestern President Daniel Podolsky, “This magnificent gift from the Hamon Charitable Foundation will strengthen the infrastructure for translational research within the Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute. Already, work at UT Southwestern is leading to promising new therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. A strengthened translational research program will bridge the gap between scientific discovery and clinical care and accelerate progression between today’s medical challenges and tomorrow’s cures.”

Thanks to Nancy Hamon’s philanthropy and her relationship with Jack Roach, her support of her adopted hometown continues.

* Photo provided by UT Southwestern

JUST IN: The Moody Foundation Awards Children’s Health With $12M To Attract The World’s Top Scientists And Researchers To CRI

At their annual dinner, the Children’s Medical Center Foundation million-dollar donors/members of The Scripps Society had a delicious surprise that had jaws literally dropping at Kathy and Harlan Crow’s home Tuesday night. And while this crowd is renowned for their generosity, they were more than delighted with the news about an uber gift of generosity. The reason was courtesy of The Moody Foundation.

With Francie Moody-Dahlberg and husband Kevin Dahlberg smiling, it was announced that the Foundation had presented a $12 million gift to Children’s Health. The monies will “establish a prestigious faculty scholar program designed to attract the world’s top scientists to Dallas work alongside other researchers at Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI).”

Sean Morrison, Christopher Durovich, Francie Moody-Dahlberg, Kevin Dahlberg and Brent Christopher

According to CRI Director Dr. Sean Morrison, “We are deeply honored by this generous gift from the Moody Foundation that will accelerate our ability to make discoveries that improve the diagnosis and treatment of disease in children.”

Jamie Williams and Ralph DeBerardinis

The immediate plan calls for $5M to “create a new Robert L. Moody Sr. Faculty Scholar endowment to support the research of a leading scientist at CRI.” The first Scholar will be Dr. Ralph DeBerardinis, who is director of CRI’s Genetic and Metabolic Program and professor in CRI. Thanks to his laboratory, new strategies have been provided for treating cancer by exploiting metabolic differences between cancer cells and normal cells.”

The Foundation will continue its support of CRI’s world-class medical research “for at least 10 years with a distribution of $700,000 or more every year.”

As Francie put it, “With this gift, we hope to increase the impact of the Children’s Research Institute and attract the most brilliant scientists and researchers from around the globe to North Texas.”

This latest gift brings the total of The Moody Foundation’s support of CRI to $17.35M, “placing it among the top 10 largest cumulative donors for Children’s Health in the system’s 104-year history.”

Children’s Health President/CEO Christopher Durovich summed it up: “Given the established track records of these scientists for finding the pathways to medical breakthroughs, the Moody investment will benefit countless generations yet to come, especially in our relentless pursuit of the discovery of tomorrow’s treatments.”

Once again philanthropy is the reason that North Texas is recognized as a world leader in healthcare research and treatments.  

According to Children’s Medical Center Foundation Brent Christopher, “This is an extraordinary gift. We’ve had a long-standing relationship with the Moody Foundation, and we’re inspired by this powerful collaboration with one of Texas’ most revered philanthropic families.

 “Permanent, private philanthropic support like this is an invaluable tool for these researchers. It is a unique, reliable resource for proven scientists who are at the top of their game and will launch them into their next phase of life-changing discoveries.”

Ironically, on the first night of the World Series, Brent summed it up, “CRI scientists knock it out each month.” 

Nicely played for the team of  The Moody Foundation, Children’s Health and Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) for generations to come.      

JUST IN: Lizzie Horchow Routman To Chair New UT Southwestern President’s Advisory Board

UT Southwestern President Dr. Daniel Podolsky has a marvelous talent for surrounding himself with very smart people. From the six Nobel Prize winners on staff to the 2,800-member faculty, Daniel has quite a team to provide for the millions of patients receiving health care at the institution.

Daniel Podolsky (File photo)

Elizabeth “Lizzie” Horchow Routman*

So, it is no surprise that he’s expanded his resources by tapping local leadership to provide “fresh perspectives to the Medical Center.” It was just announced that he has launched a President’s Advisory Board “to support its institutional mission and ambitious agenda.”

And to head up this board, Daniel has picked philanthropist Elizabeth “Lizzie” Horchow Routman, who has proven herself on such boards as The Dallas Foundation, Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas, Visiting Nurses Association and The Hockaday School, to name a few.

And when it comes to UT Southwestern, Lizzie is certainly no newbie, having been a member since 1997 of the Southwestern Medical Foundation Board of Trustees, where she has served on the executive committee and as nominating committee chair.

She and her family have been longtime supporters of UT Southwestern, providing everything from art collections to financial support including a million dollars for the William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital for decades. In fact, Lizzie’s mother, the late Carolyn Horchow, founded the Carolyn P. Horchow Women’s Health Symposium in 1999 at UT Southwestern.

According to Daniel, “Having known Lizzie for many years and witnessed her leadership skills and dedication to UT Southwestern’s mission, I have the utmost confidence in her ability to engage and inspire fellow members of the inaugural President’s Advisory Board.”

Made up of various leaders from the Dallas-Fort Worth area, the Board will meet three times a year and will “provide President Podolosky and Medical Center administration with guidance on the opportunities and challenges the Institution faces across all three parts of its mission – clinical care, education, and research. Board members will have both a voice and a platform as UT Southwestern’s advocates for population health issues, standard-bearers for clinical excellence, and proponents for scientific breakthroughs.”

* Photo provided by UT Southwestern

 

Cattle Baron’s Ball Hits The Classroom And So Should You

So many times gallant efforts are made for raising funds, but the complex-behind-the-scenes are lost in the over-the-head brilliance of the experts. The spot on the X-ray, the imbalance of the blood work and the confusion of professionals facing patients with reality. . . it’s simply mind-boggling to say the least.

The Cattle Baron’s Ball gals are and aren’t like that. Yes, they understand the over-the-top brilliance of medical/science experts in dealing with cancer, but they also appreciate the make-it-simple appreciation of donors, committee members and, most importantly, patients.

For this reason, Cattle Baron’s Ball, American Cancer Society, UT Southwestern Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center and 2011 CBB Chair Jennifer Dix and husband Richard are taking charge and offering “an evening of education and discussion with UT Southwestern researchers and physicians” about “scientific discoveries that are shaping the future of cancer care.”

Who will be on the docket? Well, cancer survivor Ray Johnston and his band will perform from 6 to 7 p.m., then Dr. James Brugarolas will discuss “Kidney Cancer: Personalized Medicine and Research Translation,” followed by Elizabeth Maher, who will discuss “The Molecular Revolution: How Molecular Medicine Can Transform Brain Cancer Care.”

Yes, the high-powered experts and subject titles all sound highfalutin, but the long and short of it is that cancer needs to be done away with instead of flourishing.

Quite frankly and honestly, Cattle Baron’s, the American Cancer Society and all similar organizations should be put out of business. Guess what? They’d like to be unemployed, too. All of the people and organizations would gladly turn off the lights, if they could rid the world of cancer.

Why should you care? Great question! Just think of the friends and family that have been removed from your life because of this deadly disease.

OK, that was long enough. Now, realize that it’s only through education, effort and earning funds that cancer will be conquered. By attending this “Scientists Give Cancer the Boot,” you’ll be taking a step to beating this killer of children and adults.

Hope to see you at Simmons Biomedical Research Building, 6000 Harry Hines Blvd., in UT Southwestern Medical Center, on Monday, May 7.

Remember to RSVP. Your mom would be oh-so disappointed if you didn’t.

The Senior Source Calls In Nobel Laureate To “Roast” Marnie And Kern Wildenthal for “Spirit of Generations 2010”

Only Marnie and Kern Wildenthal could be “roasted” by a Nobel Laureate with a sense of humor. That’s what happened at The Senior Source’s “Spirit of Generation” luncheon Friday at the Anatole.

But before the stellar crowd lunched and laughed, the VIP reception took place in the Wedgwood Room that was just a tad bit chilly. It seems that prior to being the place for the reception, a flock of flowers had been in a holding pattern.  No problem. With the cold front that had moved in earlier that day, the ladies like Helen Storey and Virginia Chandler Dykes had pulled out their wool suit jackets for the lunch and others like Ruth Altshuler (pictured right with, from the left, Alicia Landry, Virginia Chandler Dykes and Helen Storey) and The Senior Source Exec Director Molly Bogen wore extremely fashionable six-foot long  scarves.

The hot topics of conversation ranged from 2011 Equest Co-chair Barbara Stewart (pictured) reporting that her daughter/Equest co-chair Margaret Macatee will be handling the hi tech aspect of promoting that annual event at Brook Hollow; Mary McDermott talking about the October opening festivities for the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge;  and Isabell Haggar happily recalling Dinner Under the Star’s incredible success.

One person steering away from a particular topic was Ross Perot. He opted to take pass regarding the week’s elections.

Then it was on to a ballroom full of boldface types like Jess Hay seated with Margaret Crow, who just a couple of weeks ago had been on hand for the opening of the “refreshed” Anatole lobby. . .  Faye Briggs with her daughters Pebble McKenzie and Hester Briggs had French beauty Sylvie Wainwright (pictured left with Faye Briggs) at her table.

When all were settled in, it was time for the program with Luncheon Chair Sandra Estes teasing the group that for a long time she had considered “senior citizens as the ‘others.'” But her thinking had changed over the years and now, “I’m sold on old!”

Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Rowland “Robin” Robinson (pictured) did a nice job subbing in for Baylor Health Care System CEO Joel Allison who was in Washington on business. As you can guess, Baylor, like so many of the health care providers, is very concerned about providing for the upcoming flood of baby boomers as they approach the senior years.  “Both organizations (The Senior Source and Baylor) are committed to meeting the physical, the spiritual, the emotional and the mental needs of our clients.”

Following a video and a note from British operatic great Robert Lloyd recognizing the Wildenthal for their contributions throughout the years and their friendship, it was time to get down to business, or in this case, laughs. That was left in the hands of UT Southwestern Nobel Laureate Dr. Al Gilman, (pictured right with, from the left, Margo Goodwin and Kern and Marnie Wildenthal) who really should start a second career of roasting great people. While Al lauded Marnie for her decades of teaching at Episcopal School of Dallas, he gently poked fun at Kern with decades of stories about Kern even before his days as UT Southwestern president. A recurring theme was bird droppings that seemed always to find Al but avoid Kern.

But Al was not going to just tease Kern. He told the group of Kern’s incredible work ethic, his vision in orchestrating the growth of UT Southwestern, as well as the Dallas Opera.

Kern must have known that the lunch was going to have some mischief from the red-ribbon-tied Coke bottles at his table (pictured). Luncheon guests learned that Kern has a love for Coke. They also learned from this brilliant, world-famous friend that not only did they share the same birth date, but they also have a respect and friendship for each other that is unmatched.

With that Marnie and Kern accepted their award with the grace, eloquence and humility proving they rightly deserved the 2010 Spirit of Generations Award.