Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Members Learned About “The First Three Hours” From Integrative Emergency Services’ Dr. Z

North Texas is blessed with three Level 1 trauma centers for adults (Baylor University Medical Center, Methodist Dallas Medical Center and Parkland Memorial Hospital) plus a children’s facility at Children’s Medical Center. On Tuesday, September 12, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board luncheon was filled to the brim on the 10th floor of the Sammons Center to hear “The First Three Hours: What Everyone Needs To Know About An Emergency Department.”

While the new members of the board like Ann Barbier-Mueller, Tricia Rippey Besing, Bradley Brookshire, Lauren Combest, Carol Dalton, Janelle Davis, Robert Dobrient, Tom Dunning, Tucker Enthoven, Jeremy Ford, Bruce Hunt, Jason Kulas, Zelig Lieberman, Scott Luttrell, Matthew Rubel, Thomas Sabin Jr., Charles Shufeldt, Connie Sigel, Theresa Simoni, John Tolleson and Christi Urschel attended orientation, the vets filled the dining room.

Tom Dunning

Tucker Enthoven and Kristi Sherrill Hoyl

On each of the tables were salads, beverages and small cakes. The dessert was specially selected because, unbeknownst to most, it was Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson’s favorite and it was his birthday. But the staffers warned that Robin wasn’t making a big deal of it.

Nick Zenarosa, Norm Bagwell, Robin Robinson and Jim Hinton

It was also the debut of Norm Bagwell as chair of the Foundation. Norm welcomed the group including Marti Carlin, Gregg Kirkland, Jill Smith, Paul Stoffel, Dr. John Garrett, Lindalyn Adams and Peggy Riggs and provided the invocation.

Marti Carlin and Gregg Kirkland

John Garrett

Paul Stoffel

Christi Urschel and Jill Smith

During lunch, the talk was about Norm’s wife, Robin Bagwell, not listening to doctor’s order to stay off her feet. Instead she went on hikes and trips. The results? Crutches…. Former Baylor Health Care System Foundation Vice President Clare Graca is back in North Texas after serving as Managing Director of Development for Harvard Business School. Her goal had been to haul in $1 billion in five years. Clare did it in three. What brought her back? Her new role as chief business development officer for Integrative Emergency ServicesKristen Hinton was spending time in New Mexico while the Hinton kids were completing school and Dallas for events like the day’s luncheon…. Lisa Troutt’s being back in Dallas after attending Ray Washburne’s swearing in as Overseas Private Investment Corp. CEO by Vice-President Mike Pence.  

Lisa Troutt

Susan McSherry

Following lunch, Foundation Development VP Susan McSherry provided fundraising plans for the year to come and admitted that the week of October 23 was going to be a busy one with Grand Rounds Golf Tournament on October 23, Celebrating Women Luncheon on October 26 and Healthy Harvest on October 28.

As for the year past, Robin reported that the Foundation crew had closed the fiscal year surpassing its $30M goal by raising $30.2M with major gifts totaling $10M in major gifts. Since its “inception in 1978, the Foundation has raised more than $611.6 million for Baylor Scott and White Health – North Texas.”

Robin Robinson and Nick Zenarosa

He then was joined by Integrative Emergency Services Founder/CEO Nick Zenarosa (aka Dr. Z) to discuss the world of emergency services. When the room was polled on how many had sought ER services for themselves and/or family and friends, more than half the room raised their hands.

Leonard Riggs and Clare Garca

While some folks may not have realized, Nick explained how ER facilities at main healthcare centers are operated by companies, like Integrative Emergency Services, that specialize in emergency services. In tipping his hat to Dr. Leonard Riggs, he told how Leonard had pioneered the establishment of the unique services. In fact, Baylor Dallas’ ER is named the Riggs Emergency Department.

At one point, Leonard addressed the group recalling how, back in the 1970s, one would go to an ER with a specific trauma and the healthcare provider might be an ophthalmologist one day and an orthopedic specialist the next.

Nick was asked if the ER was like what was seen on TV shows like “ER” and “Chicago Fire.” Nick admitted that it wasn’t so dramatic. Apparently, such traumatic situations as car accidents, heart attacks and shootings only make up “3% of the total volume.”

Other highlights of the conversation included:

  • The five most common reason for visiting an ER (stomach and abdominal pain, chest pain, fever, headache and cough) make up 23.4% of the visits.
  • ERs have 136M visits in the U.S.
  • There is a definite burnout rate for ER specialists.
  • They see everything from coughs to human trafficking victims with bar code tattoos.
  • At Baylor’s ER, there are three entry areas: ambulance entrance, walk-up and doctor referral.
  • The busiest days tend to be Mondays and Tuesdays.
  • Sepsis is proving to be one of the major challenges facing the healthcare community, with 1.5M American affected and 250K dying annually.
  • Another great challenge facing ERs is the blood clot. 900K Americans suffer clots annually. The damages created by a clot can greatly be reduced thanks to immediate attention and action.

He described the various types of emergency services — telemedicine, retail “Minute Clinic,” doctor’s office, urgent care, freestanding and emergency department.

An ER doctor tends to be a unique personality, Nick claimed. He described them as tending to eat a 1,000 calorie meal in 30 seconds. 

When asked about unique cases, Nick hesitated, but he told of the man who had been bitten on the finger by his pet rattlesnake. Instead of calling it a day, the man held the snake up to his face. The rattler bit his tongue swelling it up and prevented him from breathing.

Following the exchange between Robin and Nick, Baylor Scott And White Health CEO Jim Hinton told of a Dallas policeman who had suffered a heart attack on the Katy Trail. Despite others fearing he had died, the ER team kept him alive and he recovered, thanks to a unique department especially geared for such people as first responders.

With a twinkle in his eye, Jim then suggested to Nick that if Chicago had “Chicago Fire,” North Texas could have “Dallas Clot.” Needless to say, Jim knows how to end a meeting with a laugh and a smile.

Canine Companions For Independence Graduation At Kinkeade Campus Changed Lives For Both Humans And Their New BFF

Linda and Terrence Marler

May is filled with graduations and that applies to pooches as well as youngsters. On Friday, May 5, Canine Companions for Independence held a graduation ceremony at its Canine Companions for Independence Kinkeade Campus at the Baylor Scott and White Health facilities in Irving. It was overflowing with humans like Jan Rees-Jones with Susan McSherry, Baylor Animal Assisted Therapy Coordinator Linda Marler and her husband Terrence Marler as well as four-legged types.

Before the graduation took place, U.S. District Judge Ed Kinkeade, who had been the driving force for Texas’ only CCI, teased new Baylor Scott and White CEO Jim Hinton, who had just recently arrived in North Texas from New Mexico: “When Jim first got here, he asked me what are those green objects. I told him, ‘Jim, I know you’re from New Mexico, but those are trees. We have a lot of those here.’ ”

Jim and Kristen Hinton and Ed Kinkeade

Following Ed, Jim told the crowd, “I love my wife first, I love my dogs second and I love my kids third and I’m completely unapologetic about that.”

Despite the Hinton dogs still living for the time being in New Mexico, Jim confessed that he does Facetime with them. “The good news is that they recognize my voice and I’m still a little bit of a wag. I miss those dogs terribly. To me this effort is a convergence of two things that I am passionate about: one is dogs and the other one is healthcare, taking care of people. We all owe a huge debt of gratitude to Judge Ed Kinkeade. It is his vision; it is his passion; it is his unique way that has caused this to exist.”

Jim recalled his attending the previous graduation and “I asked the question that all first-time guests ask, ‘Why are all these Kleenex boxes sitting around?’ And so for the past several months, I’ve been building up this moment with my wife [Kristen] and she is with me today. I’ve noticed that she’s already getting a little teary and we haven’t even started the darn program yet. So, she’s going to be a mess before this thing is over. ”

Luckily, there were boxes of tissues placed throughout the room. Sure, it was Cinco de Mayo to the rest of the world, but it was a parting of relationships for some in the room and for others it was the coming together for a lifelong journey.

Canine Companion for Independence puppy in training

Canine Companion for Independence puppy graduate Dutch II

One group consisted of young Labradors that for two years had been raised through the “awkward years,” thanks to volunteer puppy raisers. These dogs had been loved, hugged and been exposed to the world. Now, they were leaving the comfort of their homes and stepping up to a new level of education that would take place at the facility for months by skilled trainers. Their goal was to become the “companions” for those in need.  

Judy Schumpert and #18

A word about the puppy raisers; they range from all types. Some are families; some are prisoners; and then there was Judy Schumpert, who was turning in her 18th dog and already training her 19th : “I’m either on a mission for God or a glutton for punishment. I’ve got to keep doing it until I can do it no more.”

It’s hard to imagine anyone living, loving and working with a puppy for two years and then giving them up. New puppy raisers Mary Catherine Lombardi and Erica Hotvedt admitted, “When we got started, I think we knew what we were getting into. But I think the final goodbyes are harder than we expected.”  They recognized that their puppy Yoshi III, however, was destined for a truly remarkable role.

That purpose became so apparent when the graduation of the new teams took place. For the past two weeks, the seven humans had arrived and lived at the facility to be matched and trained with their new best friends.

Edgar

Chosen as class spokesperson for the graduating teams, Edgar, with Chase V at his side, eloquently told of the importance of this program for the graduating humans. One was an autistic child, whose outbursts would “calm down immediately” when her pooch, Tess VI, “came to the rescue.” Thomas, whose weakened motor skills caused by cerebral palsy resulted in his dropping things to the floor, had been helped by  Atlas IV retrieving them for him. Wheel-chair-bound youngster Lauren‘s arm was subject to bouts of spasticity and limited control, but when Egan II lay down at her side, it was still and under control. Edgar himself admitted that there were times when he would fall out of his wheelchair and Chase’s bark command would sound the alert for assistance. Thanks to Dutch II, wheelchair-bound Lauren was looking forward to getting out on her own and not being “a burden on my parents.” Sara, who works with first responders in dealing with PTSD, would be assisted in the future by Aiken II, who would be “the non-judging entity in the room that helps the patients relax.” 

From the left: (seated) CCI graduate team Lauren and Egan; (standing) Puppy raisers Andrew, Ella, Mark, Angela and Lauren’s mother

Edgar continued, “These stories are a mere excerpt of what has happened in the past 10 days. Can you imagine what is going to happen in the next 10 years? All of us graduates would like to say thank you for being here today, whether you’re a donor, a puppy raiser, a volunteer. Even if this is your first time with Canine Companions, that’s how it starts. That how you get the ball rolling.”

Summing up the two weeks of team training, he addressed his fellow graduates: “We arrived as seven families, but today we graduate as one. And here we stand on the brink of a 10-year-journey. It won’t always be easy, but I promise it will be worth it. All the troubles that we deal with daily will soon be alleviated by an incredible new resource, my new best friend that is unconditionally at our side just waiting to help anyway they can. Thank you.”

As the new teams headed home for a new life of independence, the new recruits were taken to their CCI spotless digs for the next step in their education to be a life-changing partner for someone in need.   

Lauren and her mother

And that’s why the boxes of Kleenex were throughout the hall.

2016 Celebrating Women Plans Revealed Including Rita Wilson And Diane And Joel Allison Plus Sponsorship Opportunities

The couture salon of Neiman Marcus Downtown looked like a high-price trunk show collection on the morning of Tuesday, April 5, with loads of the fashionable fundraising types checking out the clothes. Actually, they were there for the announcement of the Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s 2016 Celebrating Women Luncheon.

Outside the flagship store, Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s Jen Huntsberry waited. It was such a beautiful day compared to a year ago when it was damp and rainy. But Jen wasn’t just taking in the rays. She was waiting for Baylor Scott And White Health COO John McWhorter. This was his first time to attend the annual reveal.

Robin Robinson, Gloria Eulich Martindale, Aileen Pratt and John McWhorter

Robin Robinson, Gloria Eulich Martindale, Aileen Pratt and John McWhorter

No sooner had John appeared on NM’s second floor than he was being photographed with 2016 Celebrating Women Chair Aileen Pratt, Underwriting Chair Gloria Eulich Martindale and Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson.

Barbara Stuart, Lindalyn Adams, Robin Robinson, Christie Carter, Nancy Carter, Margo Goodwin, Pam Perella, Carol Seay and Susan McSherry

Barbara Stuart, Lindalyn Adams, Robin Robinson, Christie Carter, Nancy Carter, Margo Goodwin, Pam Perella, Carol Seay and Susan McSherry

And then he watched as various photo setups took place including all the past luncheon chairs like Nancy Carter, Christie Carter, Barbara Stuart, Susan McSherry, Margo Goodwin, Carol Seay and Pam Perella and Celebrating Women Luncheon Queen Mother Lindalyn Adams.

Rita Wilson*

Rita Wilson*

As deviled eggs made the rounds, the gals and fellas found themselves herded into the Glass House to hear that Tom Hanks’ sweetheart, Rita Wilson, would be the featured speaker on Thursday, October 20, at the Hilton Anatole.

As for the honorary co-chairs, this year is gonna be a couple that has been part of the Baylor effort to treat and research breast cancer — Diane and Baylor Scott And White Health President/CEO Joel Allison, who is making his victory lap to his stepping down on February 1, 2017.

Tickets are on sale now, plus all types of sponsorship opportunities. The following sponsorships have already been snapped up: Presenting Sponsor — Tom Thumb, Patron Party — Comerica Bank, VIP Reception — PlainsCapital Bank, Luncheon Invitation — Sidley Austin LLP and Luncheon Program — Allie Beth Allman.