Joel Allison Addressed The Future Of Healthcare At The Senior Source’s 18th Annual Charles C. Sprague Sage Society Dinner

The Senior Source‘s Charles C. Sprague Sage Society was established in 1999 with the late Charles Sprague leading the charge to help raise funds and awareness about the growing needs of the elderly. To help achieve these goals, the annual Sprague dinner has been annually held for the past 17 years. This year’s dinner was highlighted by former Baylor Scott and White Health President/CEO Joel Allison as the keynote speaker. It was just back in 2015 that Joel was the recipient of The Senior Source’s Spirit of Generations Award. Here is a report from the field about the dinner:

On Tuesday, April 25, a crowd of 130 philanthropists committed to improving the quality of life for older adults in North Texas gathered at the Dallas Country Club for The Charles C. Sprague Sage Society’s 18th Annual Dinner and Program, hosted by Dallas non-profit organization The Senior Source. Headlining this year’s event was Joel Allison, immediate past president and CEO of Baylor Scott and White Health, speaking on a topic that’s been dominating headlines: “Health Care in America: Where Do We Go from Here.” Among Mr. Allison’s many astute observations were that much of the debate lately is focused on insurance and billing rather than health care itself, and that the doctor/patient relationship should be considered above all other relationships.

Scott and Susan Wilson, Joel Allison, Cortney Nicolato and John Taylor III*

“Joel was the perfect expert to speak about the future of health care in America,” said Scott Wilson, who co-chaired the event with his wife, Susan. “Our Sage Society members really enjoyed his perspective, his industry-wide knowledge of such a layered and complex subject, and his uncanny ability to make it understandable for those not in the health care field.”

In addition to co-chairing the event together, the Wilsons also celebrated their 36th wedding anniversary at the event. “The centerpieces on your table are for sale after the presentation, one will be in my home on the sofa table behind my couch where I will be sleeping tonight,” remarked Scott about the timing.

Leonard Riggs and Alayne Sprague*

Diane Allison*

Debbie Oates, Christie Carter, Dee Collins Torbert, Carol Huckin and Pam Busbee*

Cathy and Larry Helm*

Sara and Gary Ahr*

While the subject of health care was top of mind at the event, the crowd at the The Charles C. Sprague Sage Society’s 18th Annual Dinner and Program was also very committed to The Senior Source. Guests in attendance included The Senior Source President/CEO Cortney NicolatoSusie and Jim Riley, Cher and David Jacobs, Pam Busbee, Debbie Oates, Christie Carter, Carol Huckin, Dee Collins Torbert, Sara and Gary Ahr, Gail and Warren Randell, Sharon and Mike McCullough, Jane and Pat Jennevein, John Taylor III, Leonard Riggs and Alayne Sprague. Keynote speaker Joel Allison was joined by his wife, Diane Allison. Atmos Energy, the presenting underwriter, and KPMG LLP, as partner underwriter, made it possible for 100 percent of the members’ contributions to directly benefit the agency’s services.

Mike and Sharon McCullough and Gail and Warren Randell*

Jim and Susie Riley and Cher and David Jacobs*

The Sage Society is a special associates program that educates members on aging issues and supports the programs of The Senior Source. It was founded in 1999 under the leadership of the late Dr. Charles Sprague, then Chairman Emeritus of Southwest Medical Foundation. Membership to the Society entitles participants to attend entertaining and educational presentations at a dinner held each spring, while supporting the Society’s two major goals: building financial support for services that improve the quality of life for older adults and educating community leaders on the challenges of the aging population.

About The Senior Source
Since 1961, The Senior Source has served greater Dallas as the go-to nonprofit for aging services.  The agency offers personalized assistance, protection, and connection support to all older adults in greater Dallas for these individuals to THRIVE.  As a United Way service provider, The Senior Source offers 10 comprehensive programs for those 50 years of age and older. For more information, contact The Senior Source at (214) 823-5700 or visit www.theseniorsource.org. You can also find The Senior Source on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/theseniorsource or Twitter using the handle @theseniorsource. 

* Photo credit: Kristina Bowman

Dr. Dan DeMarco Got Pretty Gutsy At The Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Luncheon

The word “gut” is usually not one that comes up at lunch. But on Tuesday, December 13, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board literally gutted up to learn about gastrointestinal research and developments.

Paula Walker

Ashley Jones

But before it kicked off, the Board members were entertained by musicians and artists like Ashley Jones from Baylor’s Arts in Medicine program at Sammons Cancer Center. Developed by Bonnie Pittman, the program is provided free-of-charge for cancer patients at Baylor as a creative therapy thanks to a donation by Paula Walker. Another part of the program is for musicians to play at bedside. When the program began in 2015, there were 300 requests for musical practitioners. This past year the monthly rate had risen to more than 2,000.

Margo Goodwin, Leonard Riggs and Annette Simmons

Amy Turner

Jerry Fullinwider and Martha Hackbarth

As guests like Nancy Dedman, Kelly Green, Richard Holt, Kathy Crow, Michal Powell, Amy Turner, Julie Turner, Su-Su Meyer, Leonard Riggs, Annette Simmons, Jerry Fullinwider, Martha Hackbarth, Trisha Wilson, Randi Halsell, Jill Smith, Paul Stoffel, Sharon McCullough, ­­­Lana and Barry Andrews and Tavia Hunt settled in their chairs at the Sammons Cancer Center, Foundation Chair Margo Goodwin reported that Celebrating Women Luncheon Chair Aileen Pratt and Underwriting Chair Gloria Eulich Martindale had raised $1.8M for breast cancer research. Taking over the leadership for the 2017 Celebrating Women will be Tucker Enthoven as luncheon chair and Ola Fojasek as underwriting chair. 

Aileen Pratt

Tavia Hunt

With tongue firmly in cheek, Margo explained that due to the day’s subject matter the presentation would be held after the meal was consumed.

No need. For the presentation, Margo and Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson had gotten retired Dr. Dan DeMarco to explain the various components of the digestive system. In introducing Dan, Robin admitted that he had done research by reading “Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ” by Giulia Enders. He described it as “a really cheeky, easy-to-read guide about both the secrets and the science of our digestive system. I recommend it. It’s a neat read.”

Dan DeMarco

And, yes, the topic did have a “yuck factor” about it, but with the charm of a leprechaun and the knowledge and skill of a recognized health care provider, Dan took the SRO crowd through the various steps of the gastrointestinal system, or as Robin put it, “from stem to stern.”

 Dan started off by recalling years ago, an Australian doctor — Dr. Barry Marshall — claimed that bacteria, not acid, caused ulcers. Experts poo-pooed the idea, despite the doctor’s even swallowing bacteria to prove his point. Years later, he was proved right and won the 2005 Noble Prize.  

In addition to “Gut,” Dan suggested another book that was easy-to-read-and-digest: “Gulp” by Mary Roach.

Then he rolled out some facts that impressed one and all.

  • 80% of our immune cells reside in the gut
  • The gut sends emotional signal to the brain — suggesting we “feel” with our gut first.
  • Gastro-intestinal conditions can be seen as the “mental illness” of your gut.
  • Food affects your mood, and not just “comfort food.”
  • You have 10 times as many microbes as cells in your body. The health of these communities determines your overall health. Collectively, these communities are called the microbiome.
  • Digestive insufficiencies contribute to a wide range of health issues, including migraine headaches, depression, arthritis, autism, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, multiple sclerosis and more.
  • Lactose intolerance increases with age.
  • Gluten sensitivity is “relatively rare. It has to be confirmed with blood testing and intestinal biopsy. Certainly people do feel different on a gluten-free diet. People swear by it, but it’s probably not just the gluten. It’s due to other factors.”
  • Antibiotics kill bacteria. With the wide-spread use of antibiotics, the few bacteria that the antibiotics don’t kill get stronger, become resistant and become super bugs. Not everything should be treated with antibiotics.
  • Probiotics encourage the growth of good bacteria that help the digestive system.
  • Microbiome is the entire community of germs. By analyzing the microbiome, it is possible to create an individual’s “fingerprint” regarding their makeup. For instance, if antibiotics are given the first two or three years of life, they influence the microbiome.
  • Microbiome may have more of an effect on our makeup and well-being than genetics.
  • Diseases like Parkinsons, Lupus and others may be the result of the microbiome.
  • Microbiome is affected by whether you were born via C-section or natural delivery and if you were breast fed.
  • The gut affects the immune system, moods, personality and attitude. About 95% of the body’s serotonin is found in the gut. The gut is sometimes referred to as “The Second Brain.”
  • The small intestine is 21 feet long, which results in food taking about six hours to reach the colon.

The small intestine’s length was one of the challenges that had faced the medical community in detecting health problems. It was only accessible via the operating room. The traditional colonoscopy could only go so far, Dan said, but he had been involved in the creation of a new treatment combining the Double Balloon Scope and Spiral Component being “dropped from the top down.” The result was the shortening of the intestine “like rolling up your sleeve.” This procedure made it possible for the small intestine to be examined without trauma and reduced the six-hour traditional examination to a mere 30 minutes. It is currently going through national clinical trials for approval.

Another developments that is being tested at Baylor is the TransPyloric Shuttle for moderately overweight people and fecal transplants for colon diseases.

In conclusion, Dan discussed the gastroenterologist fellows program at Baylor in which, each year, two are selected to be part of the three-year program after finishing their training as internal medicine doctors. Emphasizing the need for gastroenterologists, he added that those participating in the fellowship program tended to stay locally.

To summarize his presentation, he suggested three take-home points:

  1. Think outside of the box
  2. Embrace new technology
  3. Keep learning, keep teaching and “support our fellowship program.”

Upon his retirement, Dan and his wife, Dr. Cara East, created an endowment to support a fellowship and, thanks to the Baylor Health Care System Foundation, more than a million dollars was raised resulting in the DeMarco Fellow each year that is fully funded.

Jim Turner and Joel Allison

Following Dan’s presentation, Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees Chair Jim Turner told the foundation board members about the new Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Jim Hinton and extolled the accomplishments of retiring Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Joel Allison. Among them: during Joel’s 23-year tenure, he grew Baylor from a $1-billion asset healthcare system to $10 billion today; the merger with Scott & White; heading up 45,000 employees, 48 hospitals and countless other undertakings resulting in Baylor being one of the top ten not-for-profit healthcare companies in the country and the leading not-for-profit in Texas.

While Joel will officially retire on his birthday (Wednesday, February 1), he will remain as an advisor to Jim Turner. This relationship dates back to their days at Baylor University, when Jim was on the basketball team and Joel played football.

JUST IN: Jim Hinton To Succeed Retiring Baylor Scott & White Health President/CEO Joel Allison

On a day celebrating the discovery of America, Baylor Scott & White Health associates and friends just discovered the successor to its retiring President/CEO Joel Allison. Starting on Monday, January 16, Jim Hinton shall take over the reins of the largest not-for-profit healthcare system in Texas.

If Jim’s name is new in these parts, it’s because he’s coming from Presbyterian Healthcare Services, a private, not-for-profit healthcare system in New Mexico — the largest in the state.

Like Joel, Jim is a long-term type. He joined Presbyterian on January 10, 1983, and was made President/CEO in 1995. And like Joel, he has grown his organization through a dynamic period in the healthcare industry.

According to Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees Chair Jim Turner, “During this time of incredible change in healthcare, Jim brings exceptional experience that will help move us into the future. He is one of the few health system leaders in the country who has successfully navigated an organization from a focus on volume to a focus on value; and beyond his impressive accomplishments, those he leads are quick to say he is best known for promoting a caring culture.”

A graduate of the University of New Mexico with a degree in economics, Jim earned his master’s degree in healthcare administration from Arizona State University. In both 2013 and 2014 he was named one of the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare. In 2012 Hospitals And Health Network interviewed him as he prepared to assumed the chairmanship of the American Hospital Association.

In addition to his own credentials, Jim’s family is very attuned to the healthcare industry. His mother worked for University of New Mexico Hospital CEO Bill Johnson, who was instrumental in Jim’s pursuing a career in healthcare. One of Jim’s brother is a child psychologist in Tucson and “my other brother is a radiologist.

But please don’t think Jim is a stuffy type. When asked about being a CEO by Autumn Gray of the Albuquerque Journal, Jim replied, “There’s a lot about the image that people have of the CEO that I just reject — like I don’t play golf. But when people hear that, they say, ‘You don’t play golf?!’ I look at CEOs. I look at these very serious, self-important people, and I just don’t want to be that. The way our organization succeeds, and if I’m the happiest, is if the hierarchy is minimized except where you need it to create order. And everything else is the team working together. There’s days where the most important person at Presbyterian is Marty Archunde, who stands out here as the security guard and greets us all on the way in. And other days it’s Carl Lagerstrom who’s doing surgery on some little baby who has a heart defect.

“So I guess I like to have fun, and I think it’s important to have fun at work. Work shouldn’t have to be work.”

While the Hinton family makes the move from New Mexico to North Texas, Joel “will work with Hinton to ensure a seamless transition of responsibilities.”

The Focus Is On Health At Baylor Foundation’s Quarterly Board Meeting

The theme for the first Baylor Health Care System Foundation board of directors meeting of the new (2017) fiscal year may have been “Integrative Medicine: Leveraging New Perspectives for a Healthy Body, Mind and Spirit.” But it was apparent at the Tuesday, September 20th quarterly board meeting that the Foundation itself is in pretty good health, too.

Sporting a new white beard he called “an August project,” Foundation President Robin Robinson told the luncheon meeting that the organization now had raised more than $581 million for the healthcare system since its founding. The foundation has a new tagline—“Let’s Move Mountains”—Robin disclosed, and the last fiscal year was its best ever in fundraising terms. Thirty-seven million dollars came through the doors, he said, or 128 percent of the goal. The foundation also distributed $43 million to the system during the 2016 fiscal year, Robin said, bringing total disbursements over five years to $175 million.

Board Chair Margo Goodwin had good news for the board members as well. The foundation’s most recent annual Grand Rounds golf tournament was a record-breaker, Margo announced, with 229 golfers helping raise $290,000. Board giving during the last fiscal year enjoyed 100 percent participation, she went on, with 20 percent of the board members ponying up more than $25,000.

Amy Turner, Julie Turner and Margo Goodwin*

Amy Turner, Julie Turner and Margo Goodwin*

Jim Lozier and Jill Smith*

Jim Lozier and Jill Smith*

Margo also talked briefly about the responsibilities of new foundation board members. The “Class of 2017” members are: Kenneth Aboussie Jr., Barry Andrews, Norm Bagwell, Mike Barnett, Hal Brierley, Darlene Cass, Robert Dozier, Graciela Garton M.D., Jim Lozier, Holt Lunsford, Gloria Martindale, Amy Mueller (ex-officio), Michal Powell, Bruce Robson, Ken Schnitzer, Jill Smith, Bob Thomas, Amy Turner and John Yeaman.

Following lunch and a brief report from Joel Allison, the health system’s outgoing CEO—Joel said Baylor had acquired another medical center in Austin, and finalists to succeed him should be disclosed by late October—Dr. Carolyn Matthews delivered a keynote talk about how “chronic illness is burdening” the American health system in general, and what can be done about it.

Robin Robinson, Carolyn Matthews and Joel Allison*

Robin Robinson, Carolyn Matthews and Joel Allison*

Chronic illnesses such as depression, obesity (67 percent of us are overweight or obese), cancer, diabetes (10 percent of us have it), and asthma require repeated treatment, Dr. Matthews explained, and 50 percent of adults will suffer from at least one of them. But the good news, she stressed, is that all of these chronic illnesses are “very modifiable” with exercise, sleep, and a proper diet.

Several habits will help reduce your risk for chronic illness, continued Dr. Matthews, who is Director of Integrative and Functional Medicine at the Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center. Those habits include: refraining from smoking; eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day; doing some sort of physical activity (150 minutes per week is recommended, even if it’s just walking); and aiming for seven to eight hours of restful sleep per night.

During a Q&A session near the end of the meeting, someone asked Dr. Matthews why eating right seems to be so difficult for so many. “Because the vast majority of food in the grocery store is not real food,” she replied. “The quality of our food is not as good as it was 50 years ago,” she continued, citing “genetically modified food” among other trends. Ideally everyone would eat organic food if they could afford it, Dr. Matthews concluded, but, at a minimum, the meat you eat should be grass-fed and any fish should be of the small variety, like salmon.

* Photos provided by Baylor Health Care System Foundation

Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Is Served Up Future Plans And Causes For Growing Concern About Skin Cancers

Financial progress, personnel transitions, and skin care—specifically, “Dermatology Innovations and Skin-Care Secrets”—were on the agenda Tuesday, May 10, when the Baylor Health Care System Foundation board held its quarterly luncheon meeting at Dallas’ Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center.

Rowland Robins, Tavia Hunt, Margo Goodwin and Joel Allison*

Rowland Robins, Tavia Hunt, Margo Goodwin and Joel Allison*

After attendees like Ken Schnitzer, Shannon Skokos, Tom Dunning, Jill Smith, Barry Andrews, Aileen Pratt and Richard Holt took their seats in the center’s big meeting room, Foundation Chair Margo Goodwin got right down to business by noting that the FY 2016 Board Giving Campaign, which wraps up Thursday, June 30, had reached 85 percent of its goal. “It’s not the size of the gift,” Margo pointedly reminded the board members, “it’s the fact that 100 percent of our board will give.”

Jim Turner*

Jim Turner*

She then turned over the podium to Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board Chair Jim Turner, who gave a detailed update on the process to find a successor to Joel Allison. Joel, who’s CEO of Baylor Scott & White Health, announced previously that he would step down officially on February 1, 2017. Turner told the board about the hiring of Witt/Kieffer, an executive-recruiting firm whose Atlanta-based practice specializes in CEO searches for healthcare firms. A search committee has also been named, Turner said, and its members would be interviewing a number of hospital “stakeholders” to create the “ideal CEO profile.”

Once that profile is completed, Turner explained, Phase Two of the search would kick in. First, Witt/Kieffer will review both “internal and external” candidates through July. A select group of those candidates should be selected by the end of August, Turner said, and, ideally, finalists would be ready for official consideration by the middle of September. Turner is aiming to have a candidate to take to the board for their consideration by Saturday, October 1, with the finalist hired and “on board by October 30.”

That timetable would give the new CEO time during the transition period to learn the ropes from Allison, who will “step into his role as adviser to me by February,” Turner concluded.

Then it was time for Foundation President Rowland “Robin” Robinson to talk about another sort of transition: new members replacing “old” ones on the foundation board. “Rolling off” the board on Thursday, June 30, would be Glenn Callison, Dunning, James N. Miller, William F. Miller III, Beverly Nichols, Wade Reed, John Tolleson and Terry Worrell.

Then a third sort of transition was addressed: the replacement of Dr. Alan Menter as chairman of the Division of Dermatology at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas with incoming chairman Dr. Clay J. Cockerell, who will assume his new duties on Friday, July 1. Cockerell and the legendary Dr. Menter were joined in a panel discussion titled “More Than Skin Deep” by Dr. Catriona Ryan, vice chair of Dermatology, Dermatology Residency Program at the Baylor University med center.

Catriona Ryan, Clay Cockerell and Alan Menter*

Catriona Ryan, Clay Cockerell and Alan Menter*

Cockerell said his goal is to “double the size” of the dermatology program over the next five years. Menter, who’s had a longtime focus on improving psoriasis treatment, said that despite stepping down as dermatology chairman, he would continue practicing after July 1. Ryan explained that Baylor has “upped what we do” for melanoma patients at the hospital. Asked by an audience member “what to do for crow’s feet,” Ryan stressed the importance of a skin-care regimen, using sunblock every morning, and applying Retin-A at night. Finally, all three doctors warned against the use of tanning beds, citing studies showing that 95% of women who developed skin cancer in their 20s and 30s had used tanning beds at some point.

The foundation’s next board meeting will be on Tuesday, September 20.

* Photos provided by Baylor Health Care System Foundation

‘Victory Dance’ Marks Over-The-Top Successful Fundraising Campaign For Baylor Health Foundation

If the mood was enthusiastic at the Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s A Night of Gratitude at the Dallas Country Club on Tuesday, April 26, there was a very good reason. The foundation, after all, had just announced the successful completion of its first-ever comprehensive funding campaign, Campaign 2015: Baylor Makes Us All Better.

The campaign, which had an original goal of $250 million, had busted past that mark to hit $270 million. And it was bound to be counting even more cash, with the official closing not scheduled until the end of June.

Joel and Diane Allison and Margo and Bill Goodwin*

Joel and Diane Allison and Margo and Bill Goodwin*

Julie and Jim Turner*

Julie and Jim Turner*

Jeremy Lock and D'Andra Simmons Lock*

Jeremy Lock and D’Andra Simmons Lock*

As the 300 Night of Gratitude guests like Margo and Bill Goodwin, Ellen and Alan Miller, D’Andra Simmons Lock and Jeremy Lock, Christie Carter, and Debbie Oates, poured into the DCC, one of them exclaimed: “This is our little victory dance.”

Dallas Country Club ballroom*

Dallas Country Club ballroom*

And the place was decked out to match the celebration. In the reception area was a huge backdrop of multi-squares, some were filled with dazzling small squares, some with the Baylor Health Care System logo and others spelling out “A Night of Gratitude.” That only hinted at what lay within the ballroom that had been transformed with back-lit white curtains covering the walls and lounging areas and tables set up throughout. At one end of the room was a stage with a backdrop and the word “Gratitude” in script.

Shepherd and Hillary Robinson, Kate Robinson Swail and Robin Robinson*

Shepherd and Hillary Robinson, Kate Robinson Swail and Robin Robinson*

What made the campaign so successful? “I’ve got a great team, and a great board to sell for,” said Foundation President Rowland “Robin” Robinson, as he greeted guests not far from Baylor Scott & White Health President/CEO Joel Allison and Foundations Board Chair Jim Turner.

Glenn Callison*

Glenn Callison*

Pam Busbee*

Pam Busbee*

Richard Eiseman*

Richard Eiseman*

But according to Baylor’s Plano medical center Board Chair Glenn Callison, Robinson was being too modest. “I saw what it was like before Robin joined and since he’s been here, and it’s been absolutely phenomenal,” Glenn said. “He’s the best-kept secret in philanthropy.”

Jill Smith and Trisha Wilson*

Jill Smith and Trisha Wilson*

Vin and Pam Perella*

Vin and Pam Perella*

Hunter Sullivan and his band*

Hunter Sullivan and his band*

As guests including newlyweds Hillary and Shepherd Robinson, Kate Robinson Swail, Jill Smith, Trisha Wilson, Pam Busbee, Randi and Ed Halsell, Richard Eiseman Virginia Chandler Dykes, Lydia and Dan Novakov, Marilyn Augur, Pam and VIn Perella, Richard Eiseman, Shelle and Michael Sills and Carolyn and David Miller enjoyed dinner and music by Hunter Sullivan and his band, more than a few decided to turn the Night of Gratitude into a literal “victory dance.” After all, they knew, more than 30,000 donors had ponied up more than 90,000 gifts for the foundation campaign—including a whopping 40 gifts of $1 million or more. The funds will be invested in patient-focused programs, research, medical education, capital and advanced technology for Baylor Scott & White Health-North Texas.

* Photo credit: Kristina Bowman

2016 Celebrating Women Plans Revealed Including Rita Wilson And Diane And Joel Allison Plus Sponsorship Opportunities

The couture salon of Neiman Marcus Downtown looked like a high-price trunk show collection on the morning of Tuesday, April 5, with loads of the fashionable fundraising types checking out the clothes. Actually, they were there for the announcement of the Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s 2016 Celebrating Women Luncheon.

Outside the flagship store, Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s Jen Huntsberry waited. It was such a beautiful day compared to a year ago when it was damp and rainy. But Jen wasn’t just taking in the rays. She was waiting for Baylor Scott And White Health COO John McWhorter. This was his first time to attend the annual reveal.

Robin Robinson, Gloria Eulich Martindale, Aileen Pratt and John McWhorter

Robin Robinson, Gloria Eulich Martindale, Aileen Pratt and John McWhorter

No sooner had John appeared on NM’s second floor than he was being photographed with 2016 Celebrating Women Chair Aileen Pratt, Underwriting Chair Gloria Eulich Martindale and Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson.

Barbara Stuart, Lindalyn Adams, Robin Robinson, Christie Carter, Nancy Carter, Margo Goodwin, Pam Perella, Carol Seay and Susan McSherry

Barbara Stuart, Lindalyn Adams, Robin Robinson, Christie Carter, Nancy Carter, Margo Goodwin, Pam Perella, Carol Seay and Susan McSherry

And then he watched as various photo setups took place including all the past luncheon chairs like Nancy Carter, Christie Carter, Barbara Stuart, Susan McSherry, Margo Goodwin, Carol Seay and Pam Perella and Celebrating Women Luncheon Queen Mother Lindalyn Adams.

Rita Wilson*

Rita Wilson*

As deviled eggs made the rounds, the gals and fellas found themselves herded into the Glass House to hear that Tom Hanks’ sweetheart, Rita Wilson, would be the featured speaker on Thursday, October 20, at the Hilton Anatole.

As for the honorary co-chairs, this year is gonna be a couple that has been part of the Baylor effort to treat and research breast cancer — Diane and Baylor Scott And White Health President/CEO Joel Allison, who is making his victory lap to his stepping down on February 1, 2017.

Tickets are on sale now, plus all types of sponsorship opportunities. The following sponsorships have already been snapped up: Presenting Sponsor — Tom Thumb, Patron Party — Comerica Bank, VIP Reception — PlainsCapital Bank, Luncheon Invitation — Sidley Austin LLP and Luncheon Program — Allie Beth Allman.

JUST IN: Baylor Scott And White’s Joel Allison To Retire Sorta

Joel Allison (File photo)

Joel Allison (File photo)

Our good buddy Matt Goodman over at D Healthcare Daily just broke the news that former Marine/current Baylor Scott and White Health CEO Joel Allison has announced his retirement.

It’s really not like a sit-on-the-couch type of change. It’s more like moving into a new career.

Starting on Wednesday, February 1, 2017, when Joel officially turns 69, he’ll become senior advisor to the chair of the Board of Baylor Scott and White Health.

In his new position, he “will advise the Board chairman in the areas of advocacy, philanthropy and medical education.”

Joel and his wife of 46 years, Diane Allison, will live in Waco near their alma mater — Baylor University — and Joel will office out of Temple.

Checking with our other good buddy Jen Huntsberry over at Baylor Health Care System Foundation, a nationwide search will take place for Joel’s replacement… as if there were anyone who could replace Joel!

Baylor Scott And White CEO Joel Allison Accepted 2015 Spirit Of Generations With Humility And Compassion Despite A “Blow”

‘Twas the Monday before Thanksgiving and the Anatole was busy, busy, busy. While out-of-towners were hustling out the door to awaiting buses for tours of Dallas, locals were heading to The Senior Source’s 2015 Spirit of Generations Luncheon.

This luncheon tends to be the daytime version of the Robert S. Folsom Leadership Award Dinner because the honoree never knows what to expect.

Gregg Ballew, Molly Bogen, Boone Powell Jr, Elizabeth Gambrell, David and Elaine Nelson and Joel Allison

Gregg Ballew, Molly Bogen, Boone Powell Jr, Elizabeth Gambrell, David and Elaine Nelson and Joel Allison

While nearly 900 checked in at the Grand Ballroom, patrons gathered for a private reception with honoree Baylor Scott and White CEO Joel Allison. Despite his being an old hand at hosting such gatherings, Joel seemed a little overwhelmed at the attention given him by the likes of Boone Powell Jr., Becky Bright, Elaine and David Nelson, Bob White, Randi Halsell, Barbara Stuart, Debbie Oates, Suzy Gekiere, Caren and Pete Kline and loads of Baylor types (Robin Robinson, Lindalyn Adams, Jennifer Coleman and husband Brad Stribling and, of course, Joel’s “bride” Diane Allison).

Debbie Oates

Debbie Oates

Jennifer Coleman and Brad Stribling

Jennifer Coleman and Brad Stribling

Sara Lee Gardner

Sara Lee Gardner

Pete and Caren Kline

Pete and Caren Kline

Diane Allison

Diane Allison

On the other hand, The Senior Source President/CEO Molly Bogen was all smiles despite this luncheon being her last to oversee. After 40 years, Molly was retiring. Little did she know that Luncheon Chair Elizabeth Gambrell and The Senior Source team had a surprise up their silk sleeves.

By 11:45 the patrons were headed to the Grand Ballroom.

As the head-table guests took their place promptly at 11:55, Community Partners of Dallas VP Joanna Clarke told that her support of The Senior Source came through her learning about the organization through her Junior League of Dallas days.

At noon sharp The Senior Source Board Chair Gregg Ballew introduced the table, and Baylor Scott & White Health Chief Mission and Ministry Officer Mark Grace gave the invocation.

But before the lunch commenced, Elizabeth thanked her committee and the underwriters. She then added that all but two of the past 21 luncheon chairs were present.

Luncheon (assorted Fall greens, drive cranberries, candied pecans, red and green applies, shaved Parmesan and Balsamic vinaigrette; herb crusted breast of chicken, wild mushroom sauce, webani rice with scallions, braised red cabbage, Brussels sprouts, carrots and asparagus; and pear tart with dried cherries) was served with the talk of the day being Thanksgiving. Sharon Popham was flying with the rest of the family to their place in New Mexico, while husband Roy Popham was driving with all the food and stuff. Sharon was thrilled that there was already snow on the slopes…After orchestrating many past Thanksgiving feasts, Carol Seay was “just showing up.”

Following lunch, Molly introduced a video on the Elder Financial Safety Center shedding light on the ugly side of seniors “being victims” of financial abuse. According to the video, $37B is lost annually by older citizens due to financial abuse and “roughly 37% of seniors are abused financially.” Luckily, thanks to a collaborative effort by The Senior Source, the Dallas Country District Attorney’s Office and Probate Courts, the Center was providing “prevention, protection and prosecution services” for older adults. In the video Molly seemed to almost appeal that this program was her parting wish for the organization that she had grown and grown up with for 40 years.

Gregg returned to the podium encouraging guests to volunteer and support the organization’s efforts.

Then he announced “a little deviation from the agenda here.” To his far right, Molly looked startled. She didn’t know of any “deviation.” And she wasn’t supposed to. Gregg gave a tip of the hat to Molly, saying that like any great leader, she was leaving her organization better than she found it.  But despite her years of working with seniors, she might need some help adjusting to retirement. With that a video was shown featuring Mayor Mike Rawlings, Molly’s son Joseph Bogen (“Hey, Mom, now you can fulfill your lifelong dream of running for public office”), retired WFAA anchor Gloria Campos, retired Dallas Morning News columnist Steve Blow and The Ticket’s George Dunham (“Clear up those felony warrants you have”). With that Molly was given a standing ovation.

Molly Bogen, Debbie Oates and Joel Allison

Molly Bogen, Debbie Oates and Joel Allison

Before the guests could take their seats, Steve Blow himself appeared on stage in scrubs telling Molly, “This retirement gig is great!”

He told the audience that despite his outfit he hadn’t launched into a second career: “Healthcare has not gone that crazy.” The reason for the scrubs was his doing research on honoree Joel.

Steve Blow

Steve Blow

A video described Joel as the “most earnest man in the world” with such statements as

  • “Compared to him, Boy Scouts seem kind of shifty.”
  • “His groupies include the Pope, the Dali Llama, Oprah.”
  • “In college, he refused to play offensive tackle because it was …offensive.”
  • “Even his competitors list him as their emergency contact.”
  • “He once urged Mr. Rogers to be kinder to the people in his neighborhood.”

Steve admitted that he had undertaken “Operation: Find A Fault” to “dig up some dirt” on Joel. It was unsuccessful, but Steve dug up some “turkeys” like

  • “A Big Sleep” — Working out before 5 a.m. every day at the Tom Landry Center, Joel was given his own key because nobody could get up that early to open the center. He thought it would be a good idea for all the Baylor staff to work out and sent out a memo. The next morning at 4:45 a.m. the place was packed with doctors, nurses and staff. While an invigorated Joel carried on the day’s duties, his teammates looked a little worn out.
  • “Unnecessary Roughness” — His dedication to Baylor University football is renowned. He thought it might be just the thing to “broadcast Baylor games throughout all the medical centers.” However, hearing Joel and the senior leaders hollering, “Rip ’em up. Tear ’em up; “Sic ’em, sic ’em!” was a bit “unsettling.”

Steve told the group that Joel’s favorite comedian was Jeff Foxworthy and how Jeff’s understanding of medical terms didn’t quite sync with the Oxford Dictionary of Medicine. Examples:

  • Benign — “What you be after you be eight.”
  • Morbid —”Dang, a higher bid than mine.”
  • Fibula — “Well, that’s just a little old lie.”
  • Barium — “That’s what doctors do when patients die.”
  • Dilate — “To live long.”
Joel Allison and Margo Goodwin

Joel Allison and Margo Goodwin

Steve then turned the program over to The Senior Source’s Honorary Lifetime Director and Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Chair Margo Goodwin, who got down to business and told of his dedication, his integrity and his accomplishments.

She recalled when Boone Powell Jr. hired Joel over 40 years ago he recognized Joel’s humility and compassion and “those core traits have stayed with Joel forever.”

Upon receiving his award, Joel displayed the “core traits” that Margo spoke of. He graciously thanked Margo, Steve, Gregg, Elizabeth, Elaine and David Nelson, Boone, his family and described The Senior Source as “the most outstanding organization in this community.”

In typical Joel fashion, he accepted the award “on behalf of the men and women of Baylor Scott and White Health that I have the privilege of serving every day. And it’s because of their dedication, their commitment, their compassion and their passion for delivering health care that I stand here before you.”

Joel Allison, Elizabeth Gambrell and Boone Powell Jr.

Joel Allison, Elizabeth Gambrell and Boone Powell Jr.

He also thanked the volunteers including the Baylor board and publicly saluted Molly.

Joel then turned his remarks to his just joining the “senior ranks” and said, “I’m looking forward to receiving the services” of The Senior Source. According to Joel, 10,000 other baby boomers are joining that status daily.

As an aside, he told the audience that he was going to go to The Senior Source “and have them help me understand the Medicare bill that I’m going to be receiving.”

JUST IN: The Senior Source’s 2015 Spirit Of Generations Awardee Revealed

The season of activity is so underway! There isn’t even time for a quickie at the MySweetCharity latte bar. Doesn’t matter because the week is starting off with news that makes smiles light up on faces.

The Senior Source just sent word about its annual Spirit of Generations Award Luncheon. It’s slated for Monday, November 23, at the Hilton Anatole.

Chair Elizabeth Gambrell has arranged for Boone Powell Jr. to serve as corporate underwriting chair and Elaine and David Nelson to handle individual underwriting.

Now for what you’re really wondering. Who will receive the Spirit of Generations Award? None other than Baylor Scott & White CEO Joel Allison.

Joel Allison (File photo)

Joel Allison (File photo)

According to Elizabeth, “Joel Allison’s passion for helping others has fueled a prominent career that has touched countless individuals and influenced the future of an entire industry. We are delighted to honor him with this award for his contributions in the health care arena and their continued impact on our community.”

You probably already know that “Since October of 2013, Mr. Allison as served as CEO of Baylor Scott & White Health, a fully integrated health care system.  His career in the health care field began more than 40 years ago at Hendrick Medical Center in Abilene where he rose to the position of chief operating officer. After several CEO stints in Missouri and again in Texas, he joined Baylor Health Care System in 1993 and served as Baylor’s senior executive vice president and chief operating officer.  He was promoted to president and CEO in 2000 – the position he held until his appointment as head of the newly formed Baylor Scott & White Health in 2013. He is a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives and serves on the Healthcare Leadership Council and the United Surgical Partners, International Board.  In addition, he is involved in many other state and local organizations including the Texas Business Leadership Council, Baylor University Board of Regents and Dallas Citizens Council. He is also a past chairman of the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas Board and the Dallas Regional Chamber Board.”

What you may not know is that Joel was graduated from Baylor University with a degree in journalism and religion, received his master’s degree in health care administration from Trinity University and is a graduate of the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program.

This fundraising event is definitely one of the highlights of the Fall luncheon schedule. 2014 Spirit of Generations Awardee Kay Bailey Hutchinson is probably still recovering from “Cousin Lavelle’s” shenanigans last year.

Daddy-O’s Joel Allison, Dan Novakov And Mike Rawlings Honored At Father Of The Year Award Luncheon

The spring winds were flirting with a vengeance, giving hairstyles a fit at the Frontiers of Flight Museum. Now, normally it wouldn’t be a problem for guests. They would slip between their cars and the valet drop-off and walk just a few yards into the place. But, alas, there was no valet, so guests discovered the back world of parking at the museum.

Luckily, this was a hearty group with an equal number of gals and gents, so they braced follicles and skirts as they made their way around the filled parking to the entrance. It was well worth it.

The 39th Annual Father of the Year Awards Luncheon not only paid tribute to Dallas dads — Joel Allison, Dan Novakov and Mayor Mike Rawlings — it also benefited the honorees’ pet charities. This year those were Faith in Action initiatives at Baylor Health Care System Foundation for Joel, Bishop Dunne Catholic School for Dan and Genesis Women’s Shelter for Mike. Funds also went to the Father of the Year Scholarship recipient Noemi Rosales Santillan and Sylvan Landau Founder’s Scholarship recipient Paige Scott.

Noemi Rosales Santillan and Scott Murray

Noemi Rosales Santillan and Scott Murray

After a VIP reception on the upper level, lunch was underway. Well, sorta.

The first attempt at the video presentation of the beneficiaries looked great but there was no sound. Quick-thinking emcee Scott Murray quickly took control, saying that the video wasn’t quite right and for guests to settle back for lunching on salad, grilled chicken with cilantro cream sauce, glazed carrots and roasted garlic mashers. In the crowd were Robin Robinson, Jan Langbein, Susan Wells Jenevein, Debbie Oates, Louise Griffeth, Linda Secret, Tom Dunning, Cynthia and Brice Beaird and past recipients like Stan Levenson and Crawford Brock.

Jan Langbein, Robin Robinson, Susan Wells Jenevein

Jan Langbein, Robin Robinson, Susan Wells Jenevein

A few minutes later the video made a second try, but this time the video started where it had left off. Doug Murray hit a couple of buttons at the production table and all was right.

In the meantime, the honorees were joined by their families at front row tables. Joel had been prepared for his sons Blake Allison and Brent Allison but daughter/Austinite Celeste Allison surprised him.

Brent Allison, Celeste Allison, Joel Allison and Blake Allison

Brent Allison, Celeste Allison, Joel Allison and Blake Allison

As Dallas’ First Lady Micki Rawlings looked on, honoree Mike posed for photos with daughter Michelle Rawlings and son Gunnar Rawlings.

Michelle Rawlings, Mike Rawlings and Gunnar Rawlings

Michelle Rawlings, Mike Rawlings and Gunnar Rawlings

Over at the Novakov table, Dan was surrounded by three generations including mom-in-law Isabell Haggar, kids Isabell Novakov and Daniel Novakov along with Dan’s wife Lydia Novakov, whom Dan described as the quarterback of Team Novakov. When asked about her dad being named Father of the Year, Isabell N. smiled mischievously and replied, “That makes me the ‘Daughter of the Year.’”

Daniel Novakov, Dan Novakov and Isabell Novakov

Daniel Novakov, Dan Novakov and Isabell Novakov

If you’d like to see just who else has been honored since 1976, an exhibition of the FOTY portraits will be on display through Father’s Day weekend at NorthPark.

Joel Allison’s Mother-In-Law Should Have Attended the Virginia Chandler Dykes Luncheon

Thursday Baylor Health Care System’s headman Joel Allison found himself surrounded by a ballroom full of healthy, happy people. While normally that wouldn’t be a big deal. Joel is often in big rooms with lots of smiling folks. But this time they were all there at Belo Mansion to see him receive the 9th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.

Virginia Chandler Dykes

Presented by Bank of Texas and Texas Woman’s University, the luncheon was slated to have an additional perk — Ebby Halliday was to be the honorary event chair. But, alas, Ebby was unable to make it to receive a white TWU hat. However, Virginia Chandler Dykes handled the situation seamlessly explaining that the white hat would be sent to Ebby (ages ago, Ebby sold hats) immediately. Everyone knows that Ebby is a hat expert from her early days as a chapeau sales gal.

Why white?  “White – because Ebby is one of the good guys,” Virginia said.

Joel Allison

Then it was on to Joel’s time in the spotlight. Last year’s award recipient Kathleen Mason introduced Joel saying, “Well, if I couldn’t win the award two years in a row, I’m happy that Joel is receiving it!”

Joel wasn’t about to let Kathleen have the last laugh. He started his acceptance saying that if his mother had been there, “she would be proud, but his mother-in-law would be in shock.”

Then he got on to serious stuff saying, that he was humbled and honored to receive the award, but he was accepting it on behalf of all the men and women of Baylor Health Care System.

Norm Bagwell and Dr. Ann Stuart

Joel then discussed Texas Woman’s University and Baylor’s sharing “a common interest…excellence in the medical field. TWU has a long history of providing excellence and is a valuable resource to the area, the region and the state, providing well-trained men and women who make a huge impact in health care.”

Turning tables on the organizers, Joel recognized and honored his friend/Bank of Texas Chairman of the Board/CEO  Norm Bagwell, TWU Chancellor and President Dr. Ann Stuart and Virginia.

“Virginia, a great friend with truly exemplary attributes…innovator, advocate, philanthropist and a true servant leader who has left a legacy at Baylor,” Joel said.

Just in case you aren’t up to date on Virginia, she is a TWU alumna, and was the director of the Occupational and Recreational Therapy Department at Baylor University Medical Center for 25 years.

Joel’s mother-in-law might have been surprised at the day’s recognition, but no one else in the room was.

Photos by Kristina Bowman