JUST IN: 2017 Awards Of Excellence Luncheon Honorees Announced

Office Depot is the currently frontline of activity as schools are kicking back into gear. Just as soon as school supplies empty the shelves, retailers will start displaying Halloween paraphernalia. Yes, fall is on its way and along with it, one of the season’s favorite celebration — Awards For Excellence Luncheon.

Louise Caldwell (File photo)

Event Co-Chairs Carol Montgomery and Kaysie Montgomery with the help of advisor/coordinator, history-loving Louise Caldwell and Honorary Co-Chairs Joanne and Tony Roosevelt, have just announced this year’s lineup of honorees for the Dallas Historical Society fundraiser on Thursday, November 9, at The Fairmont Dallas.

The 2017 recipients include:

  • Arts Leadership – Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller (This award is given to that individual(s) who has enriched the cultural life of Dallas as planner, organizer, fundraiser, collector or art historian.) 
  • Creative Arts – Carolyn Brown (This award is given to that individual whose prominence as a practitioner of the fine arts as artisan, architect, writer, composer, producer or performer has enriched the cultural environment of Dallas.)
  • Education – Hobson Wildenthal, Ph.D. (This award is given to that individual who has made an exceptional contribution to the field of education as a teacher, administrator or benefactor.)

Hobson Wildenthal (File photo)

Nicole Ginsburg Small (File photo)

  • History – Willis Cecil Winters (This award is given to that individual who has researched and chronicled aspects of the history of Dallas and Texas as a historian, journalist, researcher, folklorist or author.)
  • Humanities – Nicole Ginsburg Small (This award is given to that individual whose active sense of civic duty has provided leadership in achieving specific community goals.)
  • Health/Science – Steven M. Pounders, MD (This award is given to that individual who has made an outstanding contribution through prominence or public service in medicine, scientific research, the behavioral sciences or public health.)
  • Philanthropy – Jorge Baldor (This award is given to that individual whose vision and personal generosity has greatly benefited this city.)
  • Sports Leadership – Tony Dorsett (This award is given to that individual who has brought distinction or achievement to team or individual sports as an athlete, coach, journalist, promoter or sports advocate.)

David Brown (File photo)

Tony Dorsett (File photo)

  • Volunteer Community Leadership – Peggy Carr (This award is given to that individual whose generous gift of self has enriched the community.)
  • Jubilee History Maker – David O. Brown, Former Dallas Police Chief (Created in 1991 and given in recognition of “Jubilee Dallas!,” this award recognizes an individual whose achievements extend to more than one of the award categories.)

Starting at $125, tickets for the 36th Annual Awards for Excellence Luncheon are $125, while table sales/underwriting levels begin at $1000. Check with Nora Lenhart, 214.421.4500 ext. 106.

And don’t scoot out of the luncheon early, or you’ll miss the annual A.C. Greene toast.

Dr. John Gabrieli Explains Why “Two Brains Aren’t The Same” At 3rd Annual Jean And Bill Booziotis Distinguished Lecture

Those folks who consider the brain to be the next frontier seem to be growing in numbers by the scores. A crowd of ’em were brought together by the Center for Vital Longevity at Communities Foundation of Texas on Wednesday, April 6, for the third annual Jean and Bill Booziotis Distinguished Lecture featuring Dr. John Gabrieli. It was a fascinating night for the guests and their gray matter. Here’s a report from the field:

Just like people, no two brains are the same.

That was the message that sank in at last night’s annual public lecture hosted by the Center for Vital Longevity, the neuroscience group at the University of Texas at Dallas dedicated to studying the aging mind.

Hobson Wildenthal, Michael Rugg, Denise Park and John Gabrieli*

Hobson Wildenthal, Michael Rugg, Denise Park and John Gabrieli*

The Center for Vital Longevity (CVL) held its third annual Jean and Bill Booziotis Distinguished Lecture at the Communities Foundation of Texas, welcoming Dr. John Gabrieli, the Director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Imaging Center at the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for a public talk on “neuroindividuality.”

In an evening lecture that was completely free to the public, thanks to the generosity of the late Mrs. Jean Booziotis and her husband, Bill Booziotis, Dr. Gabrieli highlighted what principles of brain organization are consistent across individuals, and how brains vary across people due to age, personality, and other dimensions of individuality.

Nearly 300 guests attended the talk at the Communities Foundation of Texas, whose architecture was conceived and designed by Mr. Booziotis.

Ginny and Richard Lombardi*

Ginny and Richard Lombardi*

Touching on personality types, gender and culture, and the way these differences influence how our brains interact with the world, Dr. Gabrieli described how such hard-to-quantify factors might be better understood through imaging. Dr. Gabrieli shared current research on just how varied individuals of different ages can be in their integration of feeling and memory.

While age is very important, it is just one factor, Dr. Gabrieli said.

The amygdala – an emotional center in the brain often associated with fear – tends to activate differently in extroverts and introverts, he said. Extraverts tend to have more active amygdalae in response to positive information, such as a happy face, while introverts’ amydalae appear to be more active when processing negative information, such as an angry face.

Whether a person perceives situations from a “glass half-full or half-empty” perspective also depends on familial upbringing and any history of depression, he said. Ultimately, accounting for people’s individuality, with the help of imaging, is crucial in determining the best path for treatments that might have the fastest impact, he added.

Several generations attended, including students and staff from The Hockaday and Greenhill schools, and Williams Prep.

“Dr. Gabrieli’s lecture was enlightening and offered all in the audience insight into how complex and varied people’s brains are, reflecting factors such as personality type and cultural background,” said CVL Director Dr. Michael Rugg. “We were delighted to bring this lecture to the community at-large. We are very grateful to Dr. Gabrieli for visiting Dallas to share his research in such an accessible way.”

His talk was preceded by an evening reception of the CVL Director’s Research Circle, attended by among numerous others including Jannah Hodges, Chela Abdallah and retired CFO at the U.S. Department of Education and current chair of the Center’s advisory council Larry Warder.

The Center for Vital Longevity at UT Dallas was founded in 2010 by Dr. Denise Park and has grown to six labs in the last six years, becoming an international center for studying the aging mind. It is home to more than 50 staff members, researchers and faculty.

* Photos provided by the Center for Vital Longevity

Callier Cares Luncheon Patrons Gather At Honorary Co-Chairs Michal And Lloyd Powell’s Home To Hear About Plans

The sky was blue without a cloud in the sky on Tuesday, March 1. While primary voting was ending, guests were gathering at Michal and Lloyd Powell’s too-comfy home. The occasion was the Callier Cares Luncheon patron party. Thanks to the perfect weather, the terrace with the outdoor bar was as inviting as the Powell dining room with a table set with sliders, stuffed tomatoes, mini-ice cream cones and a centerpiece from Garden Gate.

Caleb Powell, Stuart Bumpass, Michal and Lloyd Powell

Caleb Powell, Stuart Bumpass, Michal and Lloyd Powell

On the terrace, Powell son Caleb Powell joined his parents as they talked with Callier Cares Honoree Stuart Bumpas, who explained that wife Diane Bumpas was on her way. No sooner had he said that than Diane arrived at the doorway.

Diane Bumpas and Lynn McBee

Diane Bumpas and Lynn McBee

Ruth and Ken Altshuler

Ruth and Ken Altshuler

Other arrivals who appeared right on time were Ruth and Ken Altshuler, who found themselves merrily on the couch talking to Pat Harloe and Lynn McBee.

But eventually the crowd, including University of Texas at Dallas Provost Dr. Hobson Wildenthal, Interim President of the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences Dr. James Bartlett, Carol and Don Glendenning and Cece Smith and Ford Lacy, gathered to hear about plans for the upcoming Callier Cares Luncheon at Brook Hollow on Tuesday, April 19.

Barbara and John Stuart and Angie Kadesky

Barbara and John Stuart and Angie Kadesky

Callier Center Foundation President John Stuart did the official welcome. thanking Michal and Lloyd for hosting the party, and then introduced Luncheon Chair Angie Kadesky.

As Angie pointed out, it was “especially meaningful” to have Michael and Lloyd serve as the honorary chairs, since Michal chaired the 2015 Crystal Charity Ball and Callier was one of its beneficiaries.

On a personal note, Angie told how her personal connection with the Center was due to one of her children benefiting from its services.

She thanked her committee and reported that tickets were moving briskly before turning the program over to Callier Center Executive Director Dr. Tom Campbell, who acknowledged Ruth and Ken’s establishing the Callier Care Fund that benefits “children and adults who would otherwise be unable to afford treatment to overcome speech, language and hearing disorders.”

Tom Campbell, Hobson Wildenthal and James Bartlett

Tom Campbell, Hobson Wildenthal and James Bartlett

Seamlessly, he went on to explain how fitting it was that Stuart Bumpas would receive the Ruth and Ken Altshuler Callier Care Award, which is annually presented to “an individual or group who has contributed significantly to advancing care of patients with communication disorder.”

For the past 30 years, “Stuart has influenced and contributed to the Callier Center’s growth through his service on the board of trustees of the Foundation for the Callier Center.”

After reminding guests of Callier’s unique, three-part mission — treatment, training and research — he told of future projects that would help the mission including the the new autism center that opened in May, the Crystal Charity Ball’s providing funds to provide hearing aids and services to children of poverty, and the groundbreaking of the new 50,000-square-foot Callier Richardson Expansion with its state-of-the-art clinic and training facility scheduled to open in the fall.

With ticket sales moving along, Tom broke the news that the luncheon speaker would be Highland Park honors graduate/University of North Texas freshman Bailey Turfitt, who “will share the challenges she faced and the victories she celebrated growing up with severe hearing impairment.”