MySweetCharity Summer Pitch: Frontiers Of Flight Museum

According to Frontiers of Flight Museum’s Carla Meadows,

Looking for the coolest destination to beat the heat this summer?  Visit the Frontiers of Flight Museum.  You’ll experience the stories of aviation and space flight from the Wright Flight to the one-of-a-kind “Flying Pancake;” the Apollo VII spacecraft, 13 historical galleries, and over 35,000 artifacts; the Living History program and our acclaimed STEM education program. The Frontiers of Flight Museum is the perfect place to explore the history and progress of aviation, as mankind continues to pursue going higher, faster and farther.  

Frontiers Of Flight Museum*

Featured summer events at the Frontiers of Flight Museum:

The Frontiers of Flight Museum, 6911 Lemmon Ave., is conveniently located just north of downtown on Lemmon Avenue at the southeast side of Dallas Love Field Airport, north of Mockingbird Lane. Housed in a modern 100,000-square-foot facility, the Museum provides a focal point to explore the history and progress of aviation. Hours of operation: Monday – Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: Adults $10; Seniors (65+) $8; Youths/Students (3-17) $7 and children under 3 are free. For more information, visit www.flightmuseum.com

* Photo provided by Frontiers Of Flight Museum

Red Hot Rhythms Had Frontiers of Flight Fundraisers On The Dance Floor And At The Gaming Tables

The Frontiers of Flight Museum organizers knew well that August spelled rising temperatures, so they themed their summer fundraiser Red Hot Rhythms Dance and Casino on Saturday, August 13. It resulted in a hot turnout including Frontiers of Flight Museum President/CEO Cheryl Sutterfield-Jones and her former fellow Red Cross buds Zahara Perez, Betsy Orton, Jess Hall, Mary Ann Vacilek and Jessica and Joshua Dunn. Here’s a report from the field:

Zahara Perez, Betsy Orton, Cheryl Sutterfield-Jones, Jess Hall, Mary Vacilek and Jessica and Joshua Dunn*

Zahara Perez, Betsy Orton, Cheryl Sutterfield-Jones, Jess Hall, Mary Vacilek and Jessica and Joshua Dunn*

The Frontiers of Flight Museum turned up the heat this summer by hosting one of Dallas’ hottest nights of entertainment at its Red Hot Rhythms Dance and Casino on Saturday, August 13.

Bruce Bleakley, Ellise Pierce and Alma and Mike Jones*

Bruce Bleakley, Ellise Pierce and Alma and Mike Jones*

Red Hot Rhythms, presented by VIP Sponsor Rise, featured musical guest Chinatown, plus an unforgettable Vegas-style party with a variety of casino games including craps, roulette, blackjack and exciting prizes for guests like Pat and Richard Bennett, Bruce Bleakley, Ellise Pierce and Alma and Mike Jones.

Andrea Cathcart and Laura Donahue*

Andrea Cathcart and Laura Donahue*

Chinatown wowed the crowd including Andrea Cathcart, Laura Donahue and Penny and Luis Torres with its state-of-the-art light show which served as the perfect backdrop for this high-energy dance band as they performed music of the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s, 90’s and today’s hits.

The fundraiser benefit the Frontiers of Flight Museum’s stellar educational and community outreach programs. The Museum is a learning laboratory using aviation and space flight to encourage and promote student excellence in STEM education. In addition, the Museum has over 30 aircraft from the Wright Flyer to the one-of-a-kind Flying Pancake, the Apollo 7 spacecraft, 13 galleries, and over 35,000 historical artifacts on display. The Living History program features the portrayal of historical aviators by Museum volunteer performers who present both on-site and in the community.

The Frontiers of Flight Museum is conveniently located just north of downtown on Lemmon Avenue at the southeast side of Dallas Love Field Airport, north of Mockingbird Lane. Housed in a modern 100,000- square-foot facility, the Museum provides a focal point to explore the history and progress of aviation, as mankind continues to pursue going higher, faster and farther. Hours of operation: Monday – Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday: 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: Adults $10; Seniors (65+) $8; Youths/Students (3-17) $7 and children under 3 are free. For more information, visit www.flightmuseum.com.

Round Robin May 16: Kids Come First Partners’ Roundup And Frontiers Of Flight Museum Gala

And the fundraising continued into the night of Saturday, May 16. The Flight YPO Gala was taking place at the Hall of State at Fair Park for Vogel Alcove. Over at the Dallas Zoo, the Kids to Do was underway, with the Giants of the Jurassic having 18 animatronic dinosaurs competing with the Giants of the Savanna for giant attention. And still more was happening like:

Kids Come First Partners’ Roundup

In the past the Communities in Schools of the Dallas Region’s Kids Come First Partners’ Roundup Party has embraced the western way of partying. A couple of years ago, they hoe-downed at Eddie Deen’s. Last year it was at Brook Hollow, with guests looking like they were expecting a rodeo in the ballroom.

But some folks decided the fundraiser needed just a little polishing. In other words, keep the spirit of fun but dress it up with silks, satins and suits instead of denims and bandanas. Despite the decision to dress up, still some die-hards just wouldn’t give up their boots and jeans.

Allie Beth and Pierce Allman

Allie Beth and Pierce Allman

Betty Turner and Lois Dusza

Betty Turner and Lois Dusza

But the vast majority of the 300 guests including Honorary Co-Chairs Allie Beth and Pierce Allman, Betty Turner and Lois Dusza got all gussied up and were photographed in frames held by students.

Michael Morrison, John Early and Bob Stegall

Michael Morrison, John Early and Bob Stegall

Event Chair Cynthia Beaird even arranged to have the place decorated with a “bluegrass/Kentucky” theme complete with “Silver Mint Julep” drinks and music provided by Milo Deering’s Hickory Hill band. Cynthia’s husband, musician Brice Beaird, was late to arrive. Seems he was doing the music at St. Michael’s.

Back row: Lisa Laughlin, Natalie Regen and Cynthia Beaird; front rows: CIS students

Back row: Lisa Laughlin, Natalie Regen and Cynthia Beaird; front rows: CIS students

As the silent auction including celebrity guitars and sports memorabilia was checked out and casino games played, Lisa Laughlin rehearsed the DISD’s John Reagan Elementary School students in “Getting to Know You.” The presentation by CiS students is always a highlight and reminds guests that the event is a major fundraiser to support the group’s mentoring and tutoring program for at-risk kids.”

Sandra Chavarria

Sandra Chavarria

It was an especially poignant evening, since CiS CEO Sandy Chavarria was retiring. She’ll be replaced by present CiS President Dr. Judith Allen-Basemore. To commemorate Sandy’s leadership, she was presented with Sandy’s Super Scholars “to continue her legacy in the Dallas region and to help students experience travel outside of their neighborhood.”

After all the formal presentations were done, the informal partying got underway with dancing and loads of selfies.

Frontiers of Flight Museum Gala
Mary Jalonick

Mary Jalonick

Judy and Patrick Kelly

Judy and Patrick Kelly

Those hifalutin types like Joanne Stroud, Mary Jalonick and Judy and Patrick Kelly lived up to their monikers at the Frontiers of Flight Museum Gala on the upper level of the Frontiers of Flight Museum with planes floating in the background.

Frontiers of Flight Museum Gala

Frontiers of Flight Museum Gala

Silver-haired U.S. Representative Pete Sessions was three-deep with folks seeking his counsel and vice versa. Across the way, U.S. Representative Sam Johnson was a wee bit less center ring and doing the one-on-one with constituents.

Pete Sessions

Pete Sessions

Sam Johnson

Sam Johnson

Frontiers of Flight Museum’s Cheryl Sutterfield was sky-high about the sold-out affair and having Amelia Earhart as the keynote speaker. No, it wasn’t the Amelia Earhart, who disappeared back in 1937. Rather, it was Amelia Rose Earhart, the youngest woman to fly around the world in a single-engine aircraft back in 2014.

Amelia Rose Earhart

Amelia Rose Earhart

After last year’s event honoring the U.S. astronauts, it was hard to follow up, but they did. To add to the polish, the George E. Haddaway Award was presented to Sean Donohue. In addition to his being D/FW International Airport’s CEO, he has also served as Virgin Australia Airlines COO.

Part of the evening’s presentation was a video — “The Dirty 1/2 Dozen.” It showed a special ops team arriving in a Huey Helicopter and “busting” into the Museum using night gear. When the commandos lifted their night goggles, they turned out to be Fort Worth Mayor Betsy “The Mayor” Price, former Fort Worth Mayor Mike “Rider” Moncrief, Mark “Air Boss” Duebner, Bill “Coach” ThortonSam “The Negotiator” Coates, Dale “Big-Picture” Petroskey and Lillie “The Chair” Biggins. The commander calling the shots in a darkly lit room was none other than Dallas Mayor Mike “The Commander” Rawlings. One person noted that there were seven in the half dozen. Perhaps the filmmakers were thinking Baker’s Half Dozen.

Six of the team then appeared in formal attire raising flutes of champagne to toast Sean. Then in real life, Sean emerged from a helicopter in the Museum escorted by members of the Liberty Jump Team and took his place at the podium.

Laura Leppert and Jess Hall

Laura Leppert and Jess Hall

Steve Lamb and Deborah Ferguson

Steve Lamb and Deborah Ferguson

Ross and Juliette Coulter and Stacey and John Lanius

Ross and Juliette Coulter and Stacey and John Lanius

Talk of the night included former Dallas first lady Laura Leppert updating friends about the November 11, 2015, Daughters of Wold War II celebration…Emcees NBC5/evening Deborah Ferguson and husband WBAP sports anchor Steve Lamb were doing double duty as a date night…Another date night was underway for Juliette and Ross Coulter and Stacey and John Lanius.

Frontiers Of Flight Museum Gala Had Some High-Flying Types On Board

Got this report from the field about the Friday, April 11th mega fundraiser gala,
Not For Self But For Country for the Frontiers of Flight Museum with some extremely heady headliners including Gala Chair Gina Ginsburg. The poor gal is running non-stop nowadays having just been the honorary chair for the Dallas Arboretum’s Mad Hatter’s Tea.

Scott and Gina Ginsburg and Marianne and Roger Staubach*

Scott and Gina Ginsburg and Marianne and Roger Staubach*

Oh, why the interest by Gina in the museum. In addition to appreciating STEM, she also understands the nuances of flight. After all the girl is a commercial jetl pilot.

But back to the gala coverage:

Patrick Walsh*

Patrick Walsh*

“The Frontiers of Flight Museum Gala was not just a time for ceremonial grandeur featuring stellar performances by honor guards, drill teams and musical entertainment by Oscar-contending composers, but according to one Dallas philanthropist it was also a time to celebrate for a good cause. That’s because Gina Ginsburg served as Chair of the Frontiers of Flight Museum Gala, Dallas’ premier event to celebrate accomplishments in aviation, on Friday, April 11. Ginsburg led the charge to generate awareness and support of the gala which benefits the education of the next generation of aviators and astronauts through the Museum’s incredible Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) programs that reach more than 10,000 students each year.

Jan Collmer and Ross Perot*

Jan Collmer and Ross Perot*

“The gala’s 2014 George E. Haddaway Award co-honorees were Admiral Patrick Walsh (Ret.) and former Navy officer Roger Staubach were recognized for their service and achievements in the United States Navy and their lifetime contributions and service to their communities. The awards ceremony highlighted the evening with Ross Perot serving as the guest presenter. Meredith Land, KXAS-TV NBC-5 news anchor, served as the emcee.”

The guest list (Ebby Halliday, Jan Collmer, Cheryl Sutterfield, Scott Ginsburg, Marianne Staubach, Ralph Hall, Dot and Walter Cunningham, Calvin Spann, Gwendolyn Spann, Anne-Marie Evans, Chris Irwin, Jeff Widenhofer and Hugh McElroy) was pretty impressive, too.

Photo credit: Jeff Hall

Thomas Sanders Provides A Treasure Of WWII Memories At Frontiers Of Flight Museum Saturday

For those who want something special and unusual to do this Memorial Day Weekend, the Frontiers of Flight Museum has got just the thing Saturday. It’s not just the opportunity to visit the museum, it’s also the chance to meet Thomas “Tom” Sanders.

Who is Tom Sanders?

No, he’s not a world-famous general. And, no, he didn’t save a legion of soldiers. Well, no, wait. He sorta did save soldiers.

Through his book, “The Last Good War: The Faces and Voice of WWII,” he captured the memories and images of those who faced danger and challenges that are legendary. It was award the 2010 Editor’s Choice Prize for Nonfiction by Foreward Book Reviews.

His presence at the museum from 1 to 2 p.m. is the result of Belmont Village Senior Living that is building the senior living community in Turtle Creek. It seems that back in 2008, the center encountered Thomas when he “was two years into his mission, begun as a college student, to capture the images of as many WWII veterans as possible. His goal: to help preserve and share their stories. Moved by his project and the chance to honor their residents, Belmont Village commissioned Thomas in 2009 to photograph the 400+ veterans around the country, who called Belmont home. A collection of Sanders’ photos was published in 2010, 65 years after the end of what Studs Terkel originally dubbed, ‘The Good War.’”

“So many of our residents have served — we’re very proud to have played a role in sharing their histories in such a meaningful way through our collaboration with Thomas,” said Belmont Village founder/CEO Patricia Will. “Frontiers of Flight shares our commitment to veterans and is the perfect place for us to come together to honor and remember them.”

Following his presentation, he’ll sign books for guests. The event benefits the Frontiers of Flight Museum.

Pitch Your Nonprofit: Frontiers Of Flight Museum

Cheryl Sutterfield-Jones

According to Frontiers of Flight Museum President/CEO Cheryl Sutterfield-Jones,

“This holiday season, you can give a gift that encourages imaginations to soar making a year-end tax deductible contribution to support the Frontiers of Flight Museum.  The museum, a Smithsonian Institution Affiliate, is a gem in the North Texas community that attracts over 100,000 visitors annually including 30,000 students.  The museum is conveniently located just north of downtown on Lemmon Avenue at the southeast side of Dallas Love Field Airport, north of Mockingbird Lane.

“Your  donation will be a tremendous benefit to the community by helping the museum fill the gap in areas of greatest need. The Frontiers of Flight Museum is a learning laboratory using aviation and space flight to encourage and promote student excellence in science, technology, engineering and math.  Your financial contribution to the Frontiers of Flight Museum serves to further support the enrichment of North Texas cultural and educational opportunities.

“Housed in a modern 100,000-square-foot facility, the Frontiers of Flight Museum provides a focal point to explore the history and progress of aviation, as mankind continues to pursue going higher, faster and farther. Your year-end gift will also help support educational classes for all ages that are offered throughout the year, designed to excite the imagination in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through spacecraft design, aerodynamics, model-building, space survival, and other disciplines.  Please help our dreams take flight with your year-end contribution during this season of giving. Visit. www.flightmusum.com (214) 350-3600.”

-Cheryl Sutterfield-Jones

Photo provided by Frontiers of Flight Museum

 

Fly Me To The Moon Dazzles With Sell-out Crowd And Countdown Dinner

Unlike years past when the Museum of Nature & Science‘s annual Dinner in the Wild  tended to more the “nature” aspect of the museum, the November 18th theme was Fly Me To The Moon. So it made perfect sense to hold it at Frontiers of Flight Museum.  However, with 1,000 guests, long tables of silent auction items and highly-decorated tables taking up both floors, the flight tended to be as bit cozy as a shuttle capsule at times. The coziest spot was the hallway leading from the entry to the side exhibit halls and bar. But who could blame the log jam when there were so many items to peruse?

Checking the crowd conditions like a top-notch flight attendant, Museum Exec Director Nicole Small looked quite adorable in her 1970’s Emilio Pucci uniform from the good old Braniff days when Harding Lawrence jazzed up uniforms. She had located the dress at Vintage Martini.

Speaking of Braniff, old timers not only recalled the defunct airline but also the headlines it made back in the 1969 when Ross Perot chartered a Braniff jet and named it “Peace on Earth” to promote the release of the North Vietnamese POWs.

Among those checking out the silent auction items and utilizing the computer bidding was Lyda Hunt Hill, who was looking forward to 2011 already. Not only is the Margaret Hunt Hill bridge scheduled to open in October, but Lyda will be moving her office in April with a perfect view of the bridge’s 40-story tall arch. Lyda was dazzling in an aqua blue glittering top that she recalled buying when she was a deb. Just goes to show that classics are timeless.

Another couple considering a bid or two were Museum COO Terrell Falk and her husband Jim.

Standing on the sidelines were AT&T’s Holly Reed with Mayor Tom Leppert’s right-hand man Chris Heinbaugh. Holly was looking forward to a calmer Christmas to New Year’s period this year, since the AT&T Cotton Bowl Classic will be held on January 7 instead of New Year’s Day.

Others deciding not to venture through the crowded hallway included petite Nancy Dedman, who made a beeline for the Richard W. Cree Exhibit Hall and the mezzanine to check out the amazing centerpieces (pictured) by Garden Gate Floral Design and the lunar decor created by Fauxcades Creative Event Design.

By 8:10 p.m. the crowd was seated and welcome by Nicole on the stage in the main hall with the sound of jets landing and taking off at adjoining Love Field.

“High rollers” (i.e., guests on the mezzanine) felt a little like they were watching the stage from the moon. Those seated at tables on the second row had to stand to see the stage around the centerpieces and tables bordering the railing. Again, not a big deal since they were having so much chatting.

What were they chatting about? Bedbugs! Mattress Giant CEO Michael Glazer admitted that the pesky little critters really had not been a problem in the Dallas area, as they have been in other parts of the country.

Tonya Ewing was giving her husband Tim a hard time for making her change her outfit at the last minute. Seem the svelte Tonya had planned on wearing a black dress, but Tim reminded her that it was a moon-ish type party and convinced her to rummage through her closet for a gold spangled dress that she hadn’t worn in ages. Despite Tonya’s protests, Tim was right. She looked spang-tacular!

Meanwhile on the stage, chair Honorary Chair David Corrigan and his wife Emily greeted the group. Then Nicole introduced Mayor Tom, who told the crowd, “the success of our city will be determined by our avility to educate our young people.” He went on to offer a special thanks to Margot and Ross Perot Sr. (pictured right with Ross Perot Jr.) and the Perot family, who were all there.

At 8:22 p.m. it was announced that dinner was to be served. Ah, just perfect timing for a school night. The delicious first course of Creole lobster bisque individually was poured into warmed bowls over Texas goat cheese tart. Everyone was sipping and very happy.

Then a slight “oops” happened. As guests chatted waiting for their meals, the minute hands on the analogue watches ticked away. At 8:45 p.m., guests were starting to give each other the raised brow. Was this becoming a trend to allow an extended period of time for digestion between first course and second? On a school night no less?

Promptly at 9:00 p.m. the live auction began with the beef tenderloin dinner on the mezzanine just starting to appear. The mezzanine guests, who had wanted to bid, sent for programs to learn what was on the auction block. Evidently no one had placed the programs at the tables. Too bad because they missed the first item — Adopt-A-Dinosaur and private event for 100 people at the Museum of Nature & Science. Valued at $7,500, it went for a blue-light special bid of $4,500.

By the time the auction was over, the museum had scored a sell-out event with a successful auction and a near-full moon to watch them drive home.