Crystal Charity Ball Platinum Dinner Kicked Off The 2017 Fall/Winter Fundraising Season With Friends, Food And A Flourish Of Photos

Well, yahoo! The fall fundraising season of 2017 kicked off with a surprise refresh for an annual event! Once again the Crystal Charity Ball Fashion Show Platinum Dinner took place at the Dallas Country Club. But it had all types of adjustments and they were rewarded with a manicured thumbs-up.

Sure, the evening of Tuesday, September 5, had a hint of a cool front. But it also was the day after Labor Day weekend, which is considered a tricky situation for most event planners since folks are just settling back into their post-summer routines.

Ralph and Barbara Babb and Shelly Slater and Clay Huffstutter

But as the crowd gathered in the reception lobby, it became apparent that the fears were unwarranted. While the 10 Best Dressed proved their stuff, the rest of the 270 guests held their own fashionably, too. One of the first on the scene was Dallas Cowboy head man Jerry Jones, who was immediately surrounded by Comerica’s first couple Barbara and Ralph Babb and emcee Shelley Slater and husband Clay Huffstutter. About 15 minutes later Gene Jones arrived, all in black, and asked someone if she was the first Jones on the scene. When she learned Jerry was already in the ballroom, she registered surprise: “I told him to be here at 7:15, and he listened to me.”

Gene And Jerry Jones and Charlotte Jones Anderson

Annette Simmons and Jerry Fronterhouse

Daffan Nettle and Pam Perella

Lee Bailey told Mike Wyatt and Niven Morgan that after waiting months—or was it years?—she had a brand new steering wheel for her Rolls… Shelby Wagner was back from the family country place with Niven and Claire and Dwight Emanuelson. Claire claimed it was a great getaway, thanks to the property’s six dogs that kept things lively… Ola Fojtasek came with her mom Jacqueline Fojtasek and jeweler Ross Ameringer… Also returning back to north Texas were Annette Simmons and Jerry Fronterhouse. According to Jerry, “We were getting cabin fever in Carmel.” When asked if they were still in newlywed status, Jerry didn’t hesitate, “No longer. We’ve been married 16 months,”… Others who had just returned to North Texas were Ann and Matt Schooler, from Utah, and Lee Ann and Alan White, from Aspen. Said Alan of the Colorado town: “When I hang it up, we might go there to live.”

Gary and Cindy Turner and Ann and Matt Schooler

Jacqueline Fojtasek

Christi Urschel

From the left: (back row) Vicky Lattner, Michaela Dyer, Ann Dyer, Emilynn Wilson, Di Johnston and Susan Roberds; (front row) Beth Layton, Linda Secrest, Nancy Carter and Angie Kadesky

Chatting it up, this crowd would have been happy as ducks in Exall Lake with just the cocktail party, but the chimes called them to the ballroom, which had never looked better. CCB Chair Pam Perella, Event Chair Christi Urschel and event planner Tom Addis had set up the floor plan with the entire wall at the far end of the room draped in sheer white curtains, along with bigger-than-life individual photos of the 10 Best Dressed (Anita Arnold, Delilah Boyd, Katherine Coker, Janie Condon, Lisa Cooley, Tucker Enthoven, Pat Harloe, Julie Hawes, Amy Hegi, Piper Wyatt) and Hall of Famer Charlotte JA.

One 10 Best Dressed husband, upon spying the photos, chuckled that the photos of the husbands should be on the opposite wall.

When it came to sitting down, that exercise went into slo-mo until Shelly went on the PA advising all to settle down. Originally, WFAA’s Ron Corning had been slated to emcee the dinner. But just weeks before he had fallen in Santa Fe, resulting in a broken knee cap, surgery, cast/brace, crutches and rehab for weeks to come.

But Shelly’s call to chairs worked, and the show got underway, with Pam welcoming all and Ralph showing his and Comerica’s appreciation for the work of CCB.

Then Shelly introduced the 10 Best Dressed. As each woman stood, she was presented with a token of appreciation.

Shelly Slater

When it came time for the announcement of the Hall of Famer, Shelly first introduced past HoFers (Annette Simmons, Lee Ann White and Gene Jones). First announced was Lee Ann, who looked a bit startled upon hearing her name. She thought she was being called out, due to her talking with Gene during the introduction.

In a break from the program, Shelly told how she’d first met Charlotte. Looking at the Jones’ table on the front row, she then revealed that Jerry would be introducing his daughter.

Taking the podium, the Jones patriarch recalled having watched Charlotte caring tenderly for her babies year before, adding that, in order to gain the same empathetic feeling, “Every husband should have to be a father first.” 

Jerry Jones

Next Jerry looked at Charlotte and said, “You’ve been a part of the Dallas Cowboys since I fired Tom Landry!” (Then he murmured, jokingly, “I still can’t get a joke out of that.”) With that, though, he turned serious, remembering Charlotte’s important role in persuading NBC to televise the halftime, “Red Kettle” Salvation Army show during the Cowboys’ traditional Thanksgiving Day game broadcast. “That was probably the most important thing we’ve done as the Cowboys,” he added, “and we wouldn’t have gotten it done if not for you, Charlotte.” (Ever the businessman, he said that the TV time was probably worth $2 billion over the years.) Tearing up, Jerry said, looking at Charlotte: “We’re here tonight to honor you.”

With that, Charlotte, with husband Shy Anderson next to her, smiled and hugged her dad and received a standing ovation.

After that, the crowd settled down to a dinner of baby greens, shoestring cucumber, baby tomatoes, red onion, shaved Romano cheese and lemon thyme vinaigrette; grilled filet and herbed sea bass, roasted fingerling potatoes, cauliflower puree and heirloom carrots and wild mushroom ragout; and a dessert of chocolate caramel hazelnut gateaux.

For more photos of the evening, check MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Even A Fed Ex Delivery Truck Couldn’t Slow Down The Crystal Charity Ball’s Ten Best Dressed Luncheon Reveal At Neiman Marcus Downtown

The reveal of the 2017 Crystal Charity Ball Ten Best Dressed and Hall of Famer on Wednesday, April 12, at Neiman Marcus Downtown was more of an early Mother’s Day celebration. Patsy Donosky couldn’t resist taking photos of her daughter Janie Condon on her being a 10 BD-er for the third time. SMU coed Ciara Cooley snuck in to surprise her mom — first-time BD-er Lisa Cooley — and sat between 2016 CCB Chair Christie Carter and 2012 Hall of Famer Gene Jones.

Charlotte Jones Anderson and Gene Jones

Lisa Cooley and Ciara Cooley

Patsy Donosky and Janie Condon

Gene looked proud as a mama swan when her daughter Charlotte Jones Anderson was announced as the 2017 HoF Honoree.

Unlike years past, the reveal of 10 BD (Anita Arnold, Janie Condon, Katherine Coker, Tucker Enthoven, Pat Harloe, Julie Hawes, Piper Wyatt, and first timers Delilah Boyd, Lisa Cooley and Amy Hegi) went right on schedule thanks to Charlotte’s having a speaking engagement at the Anatole at noon.

Amy Hegi, Piper Wyatt, Julie Hawes, Pat Harloe, Janie Condon, Charlotte Jones Anderson, Tucker Enthoven, Katherine Coker, Delilah Holmes, Anita Arnold and Lisa Cooley

Christi Urschel, Jeff Byron and Pam Perella

Amelia Gibson

On hand for the announcement were CCB Chair Pam Perella, Luncheon Chair Christi Urschel, Neiman Marcus Downtown GM/VP Jeff Byron,  Zac Posen Director of Global Sales Amelia Gibson, Neiman Marcus Communications/PR VP Mimi Sterling, NM Special Events VP Sandy Marple and loads of Crystals.

There was a slight hiccup that could have messed up the tight timeline. It seems just as guests were to arrive at the Commerce Street valet, a filled-to-the-brim Fed Ex truck pulled up and parked. When the valet notified the driver that they needed the space, the driver responded, “I’ve got deliveries to make.”  Peace was made and the valets handled the parking dilemma, so the guests made it upstairs in time for adult orange juice, deviled eggs and mini-waffles topped with fried chicken.   

As the 10 BD crowd took to their cars via text delivery, it proved to be a little bit of a wait, with one poor soul waiting 40 minutes for their car. But not to worry. The powers-that-be will no doubt re-arrange the Fed Ex delivery time for the Ten Best Dressed Luncheon on Friday, September 15, featuring Zac Posen’s collection inside the NM flagship.

For additional photos, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

JUST IN: Crystal Charity Ball’s 2017 Ten Best Dressed, Hall Of Fame Honoree And A Change Of Fashion Show/Luncheon Location Revealed

This morning the Crystal Charity Ball’s 2017 Ten Best Dressed were announced at Neiman Marcus Downtown. Fashionable drum roll, please.

This year’s collection of clothes-loving and community-supporting ladies include: Anita Arnold, Delilah Boyd, Katherine Coker, Janie Condon, Lisa Cooley, Tucker Enthoven, Pat Harloe, Julie Hawes, Amy Hegi and Piper Wyatt.

Amy Hegi, Piper Wyatt, Julie Hawes, Pat Harloe, Janie Condon, Charlotte Jones Anderson, Tucker Enthoven, Katherine Coker, Delilah Boyd, Anita Arnold and Lisa Cooley

Also making the runway on Friday, September 15, for the annual Fashion Show and Luncheon, will be Hall of Fame Honoree Charlotte Jones Anderson, daughter of 2012 Hall of Fame Honoree Gene Jones. It was the first time in the TBD history that a mother and daughter were in the TBD Hall of Fame.

Charlotte Jones Anderson and Gene Jones

And speaking of the catwalk, it won’t be in a tent. Nope! After three years of camping out in the adjacent parking lot, the Neiman Marcus crew is bringing it back inside the NM Downtown mother ship complete with designer Zac Posen and his collection.

CCB Chair Pam Perella and Fashion Show and Luncheon Chair Christi Urschel reported that tickets to the fundraiser will go on sale later this month. Stay tuned. We’ll keep you posted on when they’ll be available.

But you’d better be swift turning those checks in, because this one usually sells out within minutes. And remember — the bigger the check, the bigger the perks. The Platinum Circle donors will be treated to a seated dinner sponsored by Comerica Bank on Tuesday, September 5, and Platinum Patrons will be invited to a cocktail buffet sponsored by J.P. Morgan the night before the fashion show and luncheon.

This year’s plan calls for $5.8M to be raised and provided for seven beneficiaries — Autism Treatment Center, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Children’s Medical Center Foundation, Dallas Holocaust Museum and Center for Education and Tolerance, Hunger Busters, Presbyterian Communities and Services Foundation, Rainbow Days and Santa Clare of Assisi Catholic Academy.

Texas Trailblazer Awards Luncheon Speaker Ronan Farrow Described Domestic Violence as A Form Of Terrorism Within The Home

Noontime on Tuesday, October 4, had something for everyone. But, alas, along with the plethora of choices, decisions had to be made. For more than a thousand, the answer was The Family Place’s 2016 Texas Trailblazer Awards Luncheon at the Hilton Anatole.

After all, Luncheon Co-Chairs Lisa and Marvin Singleton had arranged for an all-star lineup — honorees Antioch Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church, Dallas Cowboys First Daughter Charlotte Jones Anderson and Dallas Police Chief David Brown along with Honorary Co-Chairs Pat and Emmitt Smith and keynote speaker Ronan Farrow.

With that cast of headliners, it was understandable that some didn’t make it. They had very good excuses. Pat Smith was with her dad, who was undergoing surgery, and since it was his last day as Dallas police chief David Brown was back at headquarters spending his last few hours with his comrades.

But the MIAs were hardly noticed in the VIP meet-and-greet with loads of guests including Lynn and Allan McBee (he’s been rehearsing with the Dallas Opera), Ros Dawson, Underwriting Co-Chair Carol Seay and Phyllis Comu who reported that she relieved not to be waking up in the middle of night in preparation for last month’s Fur Ball.

At 11:10 the man-of-the-hour Ronan slipped and looked like any very cool 20-something. But among this stiletto and silk skirt crowd that type of fella couldn’t make it by totally unnoticed, so word quickly made the rounds the “he” was in the room.

Sure, he had famous genes, but on his own Ronan had accomplished so much in his 28 years. Having graduated from college at the age of 15 and was accepted by Yale Law School at when he was 16. He deferred attendance “to work as special adviser to former U.N. Ambassador Richard Holbrooke.” Ronan did earn his law degree before he was 24. Named a Rhodes Scholar in 2012, he was leaving after the luncheon for Oxford London to defend his dissertation on violence. And that was just a smidgen of his credentials.

Regarded by many within the national media as the spokesperson for the millennial generation, he was asked his opinion if the flood of aging baby boomers might overwhelm the millennials. Without hesitation, Ronan didn’t hesitate and responded, “We don’t have the problems that say China has. There are a lot of parts in the world where there’s going to be this massive imbalance of generations and it’s going to cause all sorts of social tension. I think we’re going to be okay in the United States.”

Marvin and Lisa Singleton, Ronan Farrow, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Emmitt Smith

Marvin and Lisa Singleton, Ronan Farrow, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Emmitt Smith

Ronan Farrow, Lisa and Marvin Singleton, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Emmitt Smith

Ronan Farrow, Lisa and Marvin Singleton, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Emmitt Smith

Then taking his place in front of The Family Place backdrop, Ronan looked a bit bewildered by the grip-and-grin setup. One photographer had the VIP type shot in front of the backdrop and a second one would have step to the far left to be shot in front of a curtain. The explanation was that a lot of the media didn’t want shots in front the sponsor board. Oh.

At times the meet-and-greet seemed a bit unorganized. Unlike other photo opps where one staffer/volunteer stood at the front of the line advising guests to place their purse on the table and move quickly, this one was a little more casual. While the lineup of guests waiting their turn for a photo with Ronan stretched the length of the room, some were a little surprised to see others standing nearby and hopping into additional photos “with friends.” Wonder if Emily Post had a section on cutting in line?

Nevertheless, Ronan showed his cool factor and good naturedly went with the flow. However, he did perk up like a kid when he saw Charlotte approach. They hugged and he congratulated her on the award. Then they posed for photos with Emmitt Smith adding to the cool factor.

Erin Young Garrett, Cindy North and Angela Batra

Erin Young Garrett, Cindy North and Angela Batra

As the photo session wound down, guests headed to the Chantilly Ballroom. Snapshots around the room: Cindy North was taking a break from being with her dad at UT Southwestern following a double lung transplant. She was lunching with her plan Erin Young Garrett and Angela Batra … 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill reported that they were focusing on the next ten days of supporting 2016 CBB Co-Chairs Cara French and Andrea Weber’s American Cancer Society fundraising on Saturday, October 15, at Gilley’s… and others including Annette Simmons, Anita Arnold, Sandy Chapman, Kimber Hartmann, Kelli and Jerry Ford, Joyce Fox, Sally Hoglund and Distinguished Co-Chair Julie Turner.

Kelli and Jerry Ford

Kelli and Jerry Ford

Annette Simmons and Anita Arnold

Annette Simmons and Anita Arnold

Sune Solomon and Anne Stodghill

Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill

Joyce Fox

Joyce Fox

The guests settled down because they had a full agenda starting off with Lisa and Marvin welcoming the guests, Rev. Abe Cooper Jr. of Antioch Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church providing the invocation and a video address by Mayor Mike Rawlings “officially welcoming” and thanking attendees for supporting The Family Place and recognizing the honorees and his hero The Family Place CEO Paige Flink.

Following the video, Paige provided a state of the union for the organization that has been on the forefront of providing assistance for victims of domestic abuse. Among the developments is the new 40,000-square-foot Ann Moody Place that is currently under construction. It has been specifically designed for victims of family violence. Among the many offerings that Paige listed, it was interesting to note that the facility’s ability to accept family pets received applause from the audience. It seems, according to Paige that there are families that will not seek help if it means leaving their pet behind.

Paige Flink, James Dondero and Sally Hoglund

Paige Flink, James Dondero and Sally Hoglund

She then reported that they were in the final $2.8M stretch of their capital campaign’s goal of $16.5M. This news was a perfect lead in for the introduction of Highland Capital Management Co-Founder/President Jim Dondero, who announced “the firm has awarded a $1-million challenge grant to help The Family Place raise the final $2.8 million for its Legacy Campaign in the next six months.”

In other words as Paige explained, Highland Capital Management was offering $1M, if The Family Place could raise $2M. Immediately, Paige told all to pull out their phones and instructed on how to submit their donation. The place looked like a Pokemon Go convention.

After lunch, Paige was back at the podium with ugly statistics about domestic abuse including 158 women killed in the state of Texas. That was an increase of almost 20% over 2015. On the screen were the names of 16 women, who were murdered in Dallas and Collin counties. None of these women had services at The Family Place.

Recent developments by The Family Place have been the opening of a counseling facility in McKinney and on Sunday, October 30, the state’s first shelter for men will be opened. In the past, The Family Place has had to put these male victims of domestic abuse in hotels which was not therapeutic nor cost effective.

In recognition of those making a difference, the awards were presented with Major Alfred Diorio of the Domestic Violence Unit standing in for Chief Brown.

Marvin Singleton, Alfred Diorio and Lisa Singleton

Marvin Singleton, Alfred Diorio and Lisa Singleton

In accepting her award as Texas Trailblazer of the Year, Charlotte eloquently told how the Cowboys and the NFL were taking the situation of domestic abuse to heart. As part of their effort, she has had Paige involved in working with the Dallas Cowboys to “face this issue together.”

It was then time for Ronan to speak to the group and that he did. He started of saying, “I am very, very nerdy.” Highlights of his talk were:

Ronan Farrow

Ronan Farrow

  • His visiting The Family Place that morning and talking with a hotline operator by the name of Maria. She told him that it is sometimes so hard to get callers to openly speak about their abusive situation. “They say they’re only being yelled at, when in fact what’s happening is brutal abuse.”
  • He came to the lunch in two respects: “As a reporter who has tried in earnest to cover this issue and also, of course, I come to you as a sibling and as a son, whose life has been profoundly shaped by family abuse. In both respects I’ve seen two things. One, how far we have come and how the conversation around this issue is changing. And, two, how much farther we still have to go.”
  • Charlotte Jones Anderson: “It is fitting that The Family Place is honoring Charlotte Jones Anderson here today. She has been at the center of the firestorm over the league [NFL]. But she has also been in the transformation of how they approach this issue. I was talking with her about it yesterday and saying that I was going to mention some of my reporting on this. And she told me that, ‘You know the media often exclusively focuses on the negative and not progress being made. I work at basic cable. This is not news to me. She’s right. There is progress.”
  • His own family experiences: “It was also two years ago in that same time frame (during the Ray Rice episode) that my sister Dylan Farrow wrote about her own experiences with domestic abuse alleging that our father Woody Allen had groomed her as a young girl with inappropriate touching and had eventually sexually assaulted her when she was seven years old. It’s a story not unlike experienced by women at the shelter I was at today. Whether you are famous or live a completely private life, whether you are rich or poor, I learned firsthand that this can happen in any family.”
  • The media’s treatment of Dylan’s story: “At the time, many newspapers refused to run my sister’s story. She tried to speak out, but the issue was just too hot and editors told me privately the alleged perpetrator was just too powerful for them to touch it. Nicholas Kristof, the Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and a longtime advocate for victim’s rights, put it on his blog. Soon afterwards The Times gave her alleged attacker twice the space and a prime position in the print version of their paper. It laid bare just how differently we treat vulnerable accusers, particularly women, as opposed powerful men who stand accused. After she went public, too, my sister faced a campaign of shaming, of character assassination orchestrated by our father’s powerful PR firm. Those around her, my mother, me were tarred as well though we weren’t involved…just easy targets. This is one reason why so many families stay silent for so long. And why so many abuse survivors find themselves left all alone. At the time… I hate to admit it, but I even hesitated and kept as quiet as long outside of a single brief statement of support for my sister. And my sister had to look on as the press quickly swept her story under the rug. She was retraumatized by every lifetime achievement award, every golden profile. But in Hollywood as well something began to change. Just a few days after my sister’s story ran, Gawker used that story as their lead in reviving another set of allegations against another beloved comedy icon, Bill Cosby. What followed were two years of painful cultural re-examination about how we talk about this issue, about how we confront abuse when the alleged perpetrator is powerful. So much so that when the Hollywood Reporter ran the latest of those glowing profiles this year, people were actually angry. The tone changed. Women especially, but increasingly as often men, too. And when the Hollywood Reporter approached me asking for a follow-up assessing the issue as a reporter and as a member of that family, I finally made the tough choice to embrace speaking out about this as well.
  • Current situation: “My sister and my mother still face public shaming. My own Twitter feed is still razed by daily death threats from angry fans. But there is also an outpouring of support by thousands of people saying, ‘I have been there, too. My family has been there, too.’”
  • The future: “There is more to be done, but how far we have come. Domestic abuse is not an NFL problem. It is not a Hollywood problem. It is an American problem. It is a global problem. And it is an urgent one. As all of us in this country lived out the shock and the horror of The Pulse nightclub shootings this past summer, we learned that the murderer had beaten his wife, as had the gunman behind the fatal hostage crisis in Sydney two years ago. In fact 16% of perpetrators in mass shootings between 2009 and 2015 had previously been charged with some kind of domestic violence.
  • Terrorism: “These acts are a form of terrorism. They are the embodiment of the worst and most destructive human impotence to control others through fear and violence. And with other forms of terrorism, allowing this one to fester hurts and threatens all of us. It threatens our cultural integrity, our ability to insure all of our freedom. That’s why I felt I had that obligation to speak here today in support of my own family and to try to keep the conversation going whatever small way I can through my reporting.” But speaking is not enough. We all know that.”
  • The Family Place website: “It is so inclusive. Inclusive of the many LGBTQ youth who face abuse. Of the men who face abuse.”
  • His family: “Rewind for a moment to my childhood. I’m about 12 years old, sitting down for dinner at the family dinner table. To my left are Quincy and Isaiah, African American, both born to drug-addicted mothers in American inner cities. Across from me are Tam and Minh, both blind and adopted from Viet Nam and a teenager in mine, who has been with this family most of her life. She was adopted as a young girl. We are all having a heated debate as is usual the case at the Farrow family dinner table.  And Quincy goes, ‘Well, as a black woman…’ And Minh stops her and says, ‘Whoa, whoa, wait. Quincy is black?’ … Every night was like that. We were a mini-United Nations or, at least, a United Color. Fourteen siblings adopted from around the world and reflecting the world’s worst problems. Siblings with cerebral palsy, with polio, blind, paraplegic, learning disabled. The people I loved most in the world were the people the world left behind. Many had faced years of abuse before I ever met them or they became a part of my family. The kind of abuse that leaves scars physical and emotional that you can never outrun sometimes.”

In closing he told how Maria admitted that hardest things she has to tell a caller, “Sorry, but we’re full.” With that Ronan made one last plea for guests to support The Family Place in providing shelter. “When my mother started adopting kids in the 70s, people called her crazy. When she faced her most vicious attacks after my sister’s allegations more recently, they called our family a commune, a shelter, not a home. But my family was both a home and a shelter. And I am so deeply proud of that. I have been so grateful to have seen the value of giving someone shelter when they need it most. I cannot think of anything more powerful and precious to give someone.

JUST IN: Julie And Jim Turner To Be Trailblazer Luncheon’s Distinguished Co-Chairs

Marvin and Lisa Singleton (File photo)

Marvin and Lisa Singleton (File photo)

There is absolutely no grass growing under the feet of Texas Trailblazers Luncheon Co-Chairs Lisa and Marvin Singleton. As if they didn’t already have an all-star lineup for The Family Place fundraiser on Tuesday, October 4.

How about some name-dropping? Keynote Speaker Ronan Farrow, Trailblazer Awardee Charlotte Jones Anderson, Honorary Co-Chairs Pat and Emmitt Smith and Underwriting Co-Chairs Kristi Hoyl and Carol Seay.

Ronan Farrow*

Ronan Farrow*

Emmitt and Pat Smith (File photo)

Emmitt and Pat Smith (File photo)

Kristi Hoyl (File photo)

Kristi Hoyl (File photo)

Carol Seay (File photo)

Carol Seay (File photo)

Charlotte Jones Anderson (File photo)

Charlotte Jones Anderson (File photo)

But you already knew about those folks. Now Lisa just sent word that they’ve added still another stellar couple to the event — Julie and Jim Turner, who will be the Distinguished C-Chairs for the 21st Annual Trailblazer Luncheon at the Hilton Anatole. Between the two of them, they’ve held leadership roles in countless nonprofit and corporate organizations.

Jim and Julie Turner (File photo)

Jim and Julie Turner (File photo)

How about a for instance? Julie has served on such boards and committees as Baylor University Women’s Council, Texas Sports Hall of Fame, Baylor Health Care System Foundation, The Senior Source, Dallas Historical Society, Dallas Baptist University, Dallas Woman’s Club, Dallas Garden Club, Cattle Baron’s Ball, Children’s Cancer Fund, The Crystal Charity Ball committee and The Salvation Army. Among her collection of accolades, there is the Baylor University Woman of Distinction Award and the Dallas Baptist University Ruth Award, plus she is a Philanthropy in Texas honoree and a Lifetime Member of the Texas PTA.

As for Jim, his professional life has included being the “principal stockholder and chairman of JLT Beverages LP and a minority owner of the Texas Rangers. His out-of-office duties have included being on the boards of Crown Holdings, Comstock Resources and Dean Foods, where he was named chairman this past August. Having served on the board of Baylor Health Care System for 14 years, Jim was “instrumental in the merger of the Baylor Health Care System and Scott and White out of Temple, Texas, and is chair of the newly formed entity, Baylor Scott & White Health.

According to Julie, “Jim and I are incredibly grateful to serve as Distinguished Chairs for the 21st Annual Texas Trailblazer Luncheon. We are honored to be in such good company with a motivated and extremely philanthropic group of chairs supporting the event. The Family Place is instrumental in providing domestic violence victims in our community with the services and support they need and we are pleased to help them achieve their goals through the funds raised by the luncheon and beyond.”

Tickets and sponsorships are available, but you’d better get going before they’re gone.

JUST IN: Troy Aikman Dissolves His Foundation And Redirects Funds To United Way Campaign

Editor’s Note: This news was embargoed until 7:00 p.m. tonight. Unfortunately, somebody didn’t get the message. The results: the embargo is broken, so here is the news.

Dallas Cowboys legend Troy Aikman is dissolving his foundation and committing $1M from it to the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas’ Unite Forever campaign. The campaign, an effort launched 14 months ago to bolster North Texas education, income, and health, has attracted more than $35M toward its $100M goal so far.

Troy Aikman (File photo)

Troy Aikman (File photo)

The money from Troy’s foundation will establish United Way’s first-ever donor-advised fund, the Troy Aikman Foundation Fund in the United Way Foundation of Metropolitan Dallas. With donor-advised funds, donors are able to make irrevocable contributions and then recommend grants from the fund to qualified charities over time.

“The world is changing rapidly. And so are we,” said Jennifer Sampson, president and CEO of the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas. “Providing more, and more meaningful, opportunities for donor engagement for social impact is [United Way’s] mission. Donor-advised funds are a promising vehicle for us. We are in conversation with others and hope this effort … will inspire more.”

Troy echoed Jennifer, saying, “I’m proud of this partnership, and hope my commitment will be a catalyst for others to invest in brighter futures for the next generation.”

An NFL Hall of Fame quarterback and Emmy-nominated broadcaster, Troy established The Troy Aikman Foundation for Children in 1992. Its activities over the years have included creating colorful recreation areas in children’s hospitals called Aikman’s End Zones. These interactive playrooms feature state-of-the-art home theaters and computers networked to other children’s hospitals. In 1997 Troy won the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award, in part for his support of children’s causes.

Jennifer Sampson and Charlotte Jones Anderson (File photo)

Jennifer Sampson and Charlotte Jones Anderson (File photo)

Troy has a long history with United Way, having appeared in a public service announcement for the agency during his playing days with the Cowboys. He joined the United Way Foundation of Metropolitan Dallas board of directors this year, after serving on the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas board from 2012-2015. He’s also served as co-chair of the $25,000 Aikman/Staubach level of the Ruth Sharp Altshuler Tocqueville Society, and as co-chair of the United Way’s 90th Anniversary Celebration alongside Charlotte Jones Anderson.

“Troy is one of the nation’s most respected figures in the business of sports, and certainly one of Dallas’ most beloved citizens,” said Jennifer. “He is actively committed to the causes he champions, and his catalytic gift will unite this community in creating secure futures for generations to come.”

JUST IN: Lisa And Marvin Singleton To Co-Chair 2016 Texas Trailblazer Award With Charlotte Jones Anderson Receiving The Award

Before everyone starts packing for spring break, more local fundraising good news just flew in. It comes from The Family Place about the 2016 Texas Trailblazer Award.

The co-chairs for the event that raises funds to “help survivors of domestic violence by providing safe housing, counseling and skills” are that public relations couple Lisa and Marvin Singleton.

Marvin and Lisa Singleton (File photo)

Marvin and Lisa Singleton (File photo)

Charlotte Jones Anderson (File photo)

Charlotte Jones Anderson (File photo)

And what smart PR people they are! They’ve arranged for Dallas Cowboys Executive VP/ Chief Brand Officer Charlotte Jones Anderson to receive the Texas Trailblazer Award.

In addition to her day job, Charlotte is also chairman of the NFL Foundation and serves on the Conduct Committee of NFL Owners.

Her professionalism even had longtime sports-pert Brad Sham declared that she should be the next NFL Commissioner.

Until tickets go on sale for the Tuesday, October 4th luncheon at the Hilton Anatole, sponsorship and underwriting information can be obtained by checking with The Family Place’s Melissa Sherrill.

Go Red For Women Celebrated With Heart-Rendering Stories And A Father-Daughter Jones Chat

Go Red for Women Co-Chairs Jane and Andy Geisse met on a blind date in high school. It had been set up by mutual friends, who were dating. Andy called Jane up and asked her out. She said, “Great. Only there’s one thing…” She was on crutches due to falling off a car. The setup worked and they dated for seven years.

 Jane and Andy Geisse

Jane and Andy Geisse

Then Jane was hired by Proctor & Gamble. Her boss asked if she knew a chap by the name of “Andy Geisse.” Wary she said, “Well, yes,” not knowing if he knew of their relationship. The boss said for her to thank Andy because he had turned down the job that she got.

They decided enough was enough and got married. That was 35 years ago.

On Friday, February 6, Jane watched Andy on stage rehearsing on stage in the Omni’s Dallas Ballroom and laughed when he started clowning around.

 Nina Vaca, Freddy Vaca, Robin Woith and Holly Reed

Nina Vaca, Freddy Vaca, Robin Woith and Holly Reed

Outside in the lobby, it was a sea of red with gals like last year’s Go Red for Women Co-Chair Capera Ryan and her mom, Lee Bailey, Jocelyn White, Rachel Michell, Linda Ivy, Holly Reed, Nina Vaca, Robin Woith, Holly Reed, and Brill Garrett perusing the silent auction items benefiting the American Heart Association and some taking advantage of the wellness booths.

Gene Jones and Brill Garrett

Gene Jones and Brill Garrett

At 11, one of the featured on-stage guests, Charlotte Jones Anderson, arrived. She was going to have a full day. Later that evening she was throwing a little gathering for more than 20,000 for United Way of Greater Dallas.

She was moved to the VIP reception in a small suite at the far end of the lobby. At 11:20, word was passed that the other on-stage guest “Jerry (Jones)” was 15 minutes away.

Kaley O'Kelley

Kaley O’Kelley

Just 20 minutes later the doors officially opened to the ballroom. KTVT-CBS 11’s new anchor Kaylee Kelley arrived and reviewed the agenda. Jerry arrived. Rev. Sheron Patterson wearing a fox stole that had belonged to her mother posed for photos with Jerry.

Things were really starting to happen with last year’s Co-Chair/Circle of Red Chair Barbara Smith inviting guests to join the Circle of Red. Then it was the Geisses’ turn at the podium. Andy breezed through it without a hitch. At one point, Jane hesitated. It seems she was “way ahead of the teleprompter.” Jane explained the stop-action was due to the teleprompter. Such spontaneity was greeted by laughter. She picked up the pace again, only to have the teleprompter trip her up again. As they left the stage, Andy gave her a tip: “Never rely on the teleprompter.”

Doug and Martha Hawthorne

Doug and Martha Hawthorne

______ then presented the Sandi Haddock Award to Martha Hawthorne, who was escorted to the stage by her husband Doug. Next up was a video that ended with darkness and just the sound of a heart beating. On stage was Tabitha Millsop, who was born with Atrial Septal Defect and Pulmonary Stenosis. She told of the years of having undergone numerous treatments and surgeries, and that she was winning the war against heart disease thanks to funded research. With that a shout-out was made for donations. As she left the stage, Kaylee quietly told Tabitha of her admiration for telling her story.

Tabitha Millsop

Tabitha Millsop

After contributions were collected, AT&T CEO/Chairman of the Board Randall Stephenson appeared on the two mega-screens to introduce Charlotte and Jerry and moderator Brad “Voice of the Dallas Cowboys” Sham.

With Gene Jones in the audience, the trio settled back in chairs on stage with Charlotte in between the gents. Brad started off by saying it was interesting that Jerry was there because in the early days of the Dallas Cowboys ownership, there were those who didn’t think he had a heart at all.

Highlights from the conversation with Charlotte and Jerry included:

  • Jerry announced that Dez did catch the ball.
  • Brad asked whether Jerry had adopted Gov. Chris Christie yet. Jerry’s response, “Well, we’re sending him checks.”
  • Jerry: “Everybody in this room knows I’ve had my share of negative issues…That keeps you talking. That keeps you interested.”
  • When asked what it was like working with her father, Charlotte said, “You can’t get a word in edgewise?”
  • Brad pointed out that when TV cameras show the Jones clan in their box, Charlotte is nowhere to be seen. She explained that she is “Working. I have a headset on.”
  • According to Jerry, “The NFL is a respite for the real heroes in this country. And the real heroes are the ones who make the jobs. The real heroes are the ones who man the hospitals. The real heroes are the teachers. The real heroes are the folks who protect us. The NFL and television is [sic] a respite away from that… It’s turned out to be more than any of us could have ever thought.”

    Brad Sham, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Jerry Jones

    Brad Sham, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Jerry Jones

  • Jerry recalled a time when Michael Irvin was being booked into jail wearing a fur coat. To turn the negative image around, Charlotte arranged for Jerry to meet with NBC-TV Chairman Dick Ebersol. NBC was going to telecast the upcoming Thanksgiving Day game. The morning the three were to meet with Ebersol, Jerry discovered Charlotte in her hotel room; “basically she’s sitting in there. She just has on a little, old workout deal on and she’s got her legs crossed in the middle of the floor.  And, boy, she’s putting together a presentation for Dick Ebersol, the head of all NBC. I looked at that and said, ‘Well, Charlotte, this is good, but here’s what we’re gonna do today. I want you to sit back. You take a cue from me. But I’m gonna do the talking because this thing really has possible serious ramifications.’ Course, she was dutiful and said, ‘Fine.’ We get in the meeting And all of a sudden Dick starts looking at Charlotte. Obviously, he’s not looking at me anymore. And he starts listening to Charlotte and I’m pulled in a little bit, but that’s not there anymore. And all of a sudden, [it] comes out from something I couldn’t have expected. It was the most articulate description of how would you take Thanksgiving Day game that has eyeballs of 100 million people at times between the show program and the game? How would you take that and could we use the halftime that the NFL has and basically tell a story of a lot of people in need?  He looked over at us and said we’ve never had anyone asked us for it. It’s a slow time for us because we only have at [that time] the two games on Thanksgiving. He said, ‘I’ll do it, but I want to tell you something:  if it’s not great stuff, if it’s not Super Bowl quality, we’re going to cut away. I don’t care what you’ve done, we’re gonna show something else.” The end result not only worked, it was blockbuster. And it was when Jerry realized that Charlotte was a powerhouse.
  • Jerry told that after he fired “iconic Tom Landry” and “I got my tail kicked,” a well-meaning person told him that when he showed up around town to have Gene or Charlotte standing by him to soften the blow.
  • Jerry admitted that he had fired Brad at one point and was told by folks that he “didn’t have the authority to do that.”
  • Brad Sham, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Jerry Jones

    Brad Sham, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Jerry Jones

    Brad told Jerry and the audience that Charlotte should be made the Commissioner of the NFL.

Despite Sunday’s Heartbreaker, The Jones Family Will Be On Stage For The 2015 Go Red For Women Luncheon At The Omni Dallas Hotel

Now, don’t go boo-hooing about Sunday’s loss to the Packers. Instead, why not get the Jones’s lowdown on what they think about rules that make no sense and heart issues that do. Hello? Where are we going with this train of thinking?

Andy and Jane Geisse*

Andy and Jane Geisse*

2015 Go Red For Women Luncheon Co-Chairs Jane and Andy Geisse have arranged for Charlotte Jones Anderson and Jerry Jones to be the keynote speakers at the February 6th luncheon at the Omni Hotel Dallas.

Charlotte Jones Anderson*

Charlotte Jones Anderson*

Jerry Jones*

Jerry Jones*

Benefiting the American Heart Association, the event will also include “an entire area dedicated to free health screenings and health related information.”

The issue of heart disease is very personal to the Geisse and the Jones clans. Both Jane’s and Andy’s mother “struggled with heart disease as well as their daughter, who was born without a pericardium, which holds the heart in the proper place.”

As for the Jones family, Jerry revealed in an interview with writer Tom Stephenson that he himself suffers from atrial fibrillation, irregular heartbeat. After yesterday’s game, his cardiologist was probably on call.

BTW, tickets are not available for gals only! Heart disease is a killer of men, too. So, why not bring along your sweetheart because he just might like to hear Jerry’s spin on life.

Remember that February 6th is also National Wear Red Day. Even if you won’t a single stitch of red to wear, you’re bound to have some juicy red lipstick. So, smear it on to wipe out heart disease.

* Photo provided by 2015 Go Red for Women Luncheon