MySweetWishList: Café Momentum

According to Café Momentum’s 2017 Momentum Society Co-Chair Ashlee Kleinert,

 “The Momentum Society, founded in 2016 by Inaugural Co-Chairs Sally and Forrest Hoglund, set out to connect 80 donors to the mission of Café Momentum: to transform young lives by equipping our community’s most at-risk youth with life skills, education and employment opportunities to help them achieve their full potential. With a $5,000 gift and a belief in that vision, those first 80 donors paved the way for the Momentum Society to empower each young person who walked through the doors of Café Momentum.

Chris and Ashlee Kleinert, TJ and Mackenzie Kleinert, Tyler Kleinert and Nick Babikian and Connie Kleinert*

“This year, my husband, Chris Kleinert, and I are honored to co-chair the Momentum Society effort alongside our family (Connie, Nick, Tyler, Mackenzie and TJ) with the hope that by year’s end, the Momentum Society can reach 100 donors with a $500,000 commitment to provide transformative experiences to young men and women coming out of juvenile facilities. We invite you to join us in this goal and to consider joining the Momentum Society online or by calling Margaret Windham, chief development officer for Café Momentum, at 214.435.6421.

“On Wednesday, November 22, Café Momentum began its participation in the ‘40 Days of Gratitude – Gift A Future’ campaign. During the 40 hectic days that connect Thanksgiving and New Years, we look forward to sharing messages of gratitude from Café Momentum interns and staff as a daily reminder to take time to appreciate the good in each of our lives and to ask the community to consider ‘Gifting a Future’ to the young men and women working their way through our program.

Cafe Momentum is a non-profit restaurant providing a transformative experience through a
post-release internship program for young men and women coming out of juvenile facilities. The interns rotate through all aspects of the restaurant, focusing on life and social skills, coaching and development. The case management team of Cafe Momentum provides an ecosystem of support around the interns to help them achieve their greatest potential. The restaurant is located at 1510 Pacific Ave. at Akard on Thanks-Giving Square in downtown Dallas and serves dinner Thursday through Saturday beginning at 5:30 p.m. For more information call 214.303.1234 or go to http://cafemomentum.org/. You can also find them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/cafemomentum or Twitter and Instagram using the handle @cafemomentum.

-By Ashlee Kleinert, Café Momentum’s 2017 Momentum Society co-chair

* Photo proved by Café Momentum

Rainbow Days’ Aimee Griffiths Heads To Cafe Momentum As COO

Good news and not-so-good news resulted from last Friday’s Pot of Gold luncheon benefiting Rainbow Days. First the good news. According to Director of Development Aimee Griffiths, “the luncheon broke all prior attendance and revenue records!”

Aimee Griffiths (File photo)

Aimee Griffiths (File photo)

Now the not-so-good news. It was also Aimee’s last day at Rainbow Days. Monday she started worked as COO for Café Momentum. Makes sense. After all Aimee brings her background as Junior League of Dallas president, working in the non-profit sector and having run GattiTown with her husband. Aimee explained, “My past experiences are coming together in a way I never expected! I am so excited and can’t wait to work with Chef Chad Houser as he grows this amazing concept. He has lots of support from Crystal Charity, United Way, Communities Foundation.”

Another newbie at Café Momentum is former Bush Center senior director of corporation and foundation relations Margaret Reid Windham, who is coming on board as chief development officer. There’s been a lot of changes in Margaret’s life of late. In addition to having a new job, she married Chad Windham this past February 13.

There’s a feeling afoot that Café Momentum is in for “some big things in the coming year!”

Café Momentum’s Serving Lunch On Fridays In June

Chef Chad Houser may have bitten off more than he can chew literally. His Café Momentum has been a hit and a very big one at that. But it’s been limited to dinners Thursday through Saturday. Reservations have been a must. That way the incredible staff is not overwhelmed and the customers’ expectations can be met.

Chad Houser (File photo)

Chad Houser (File photo)

Now Chad and Celebrity Cruises are partnering up to serve lunch. Egad! With the swamp of people in downtown Dallas, this could be a daunting undertaking.

But hold on! Don’t plan on lunch there tomorrow. The toe-in-the-water lunch program is only going to happen on Fridays in June.

And how does Celebrity Cruises fit into this expansion? No, they’re not going to have a ship parked out front. They will have Celebrity Cruises lawn club experience in the restaurant’s front patio, plus each Friday “will highlight a unique, culinary destination available on-board Celebrity Cruises.”

According to Celebrity Cruises Dallas/Fort Worth Director of Marketing Letitia Johnson, “Our partnership with Café Momentum is an obvious choice for the Celebrity brand since both Café Momentum and Chef Chad Houser represent the same dedication to the culinary arts as Celebrity Cruises: unique, one-of-a-kind experiences; world-class food; intuitive service and charitable giving. We are thrilled for the opportunity to support such a noble cause for Dallas.”

The first one is Friday, June 5, and will provide a menu “inspired by the Greek destinations of Mykonos, Athens and Santoini.”

According to organizers, no reservations needed — “We are doing this like a carry out service but will have a ‘picnic’ type area to have people stay around.”

Weather guessers are predicting temperatures in the upper 80’s and flirting that 90-mark, so wear you coolest Casual Friday outfit.

2014 Crystal Charity Ball Check Presentation Kicks Off Easter And Passover Weekend

Before breaking for the three-day weekend to celebrate Easter and Passover, the Crystal Charity Ball gals played Santa Claus. At Communities Foundation of Texas, 2014 CCB Chair Robyn Conlon with tears welling up in her eyes announced that as wonderful as the night of the ball had been back on December 6, this evening of doling out the checks was the topper.

Don and Robyn Conlon

Don and Robyn Conlon

As the six-figure checks were presented, each of the recipients (Café Momentum, Dallas CASA, Equest, Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic, Mercy Street, Vogel Alcove and Wesley-Rankin Community Center) graciously accepted the big “faux” checks and the for-real ones from 2014 CCB Underwriter Chair Patty Leyendecker.

Time and time again, the recipients acknowledged that CCB had provided both amazing financial support, as well as validation for their efforts in helping children.

Ever-charming Café Momentum founder Chad Houser admitted that he had been errant in not attending all the year’s event, but he was very happy to show for this one.

Trinity River Audubon Center's Brian Trusty

Trinity River Audubon Center’s Brian Trusty

In addition to the official beneficiaries, the Trinity River Audubon Center received a check for $505,000 as the selected CCB Horizon Fund beneficiary.

Kevin and Marybeth Conlon, Megan Somerville and Keith Conlon

Kevin and Marybeth Conlon, Megan Somerville and Keith Conlon

As Robyn concluded her final official act as chair, she received a standing ovation from the room of committee members, beneficiaries and friends.

Movie Mind Trust Gary Cogill Popped Up His Oscar Picks At Dallas Uncorked Benefiting Cáfe Momentum And Dallas Film Society

There’s just something about Sunday night casual gatherings in the off-football season. On Sunday, February 8, Veritas was forcing organizers to haul in extra chairs to accommodate such a fest.

It was Dallas Uncorked with movie brain trust Gary Cogill giving his insight for the upcoming Academy Awards. It was like having Santa’s chief elf giving the insider tips on the hot must-have toys for the season.

Gary Cogill and Hayley Hamilton Cogill

Gary Cogill and Hayley Hamilton Cogill

Dallas Uncorked founder/Cogill wife Hayley Hamilton Cogill sighed that they had filled the wine bar practically to the max to benefit Dallas Film Society and Café Momentum, and could have sold many more tickets.

Somebody asked, “What about the Grammys?” After all, they were being presented that night. But this was a film-loving crowd, so they had already set their DVR’s.

Dallas Film Society chief Lee Papert whispered he was in the back of the room. Someone said that Lee was smart to be back there for off-the-record commenting.

But up front was a reserved table for Ellen and Don Winspear. When someone asked what Don was up to, he was surprised at the question, answering, “I thought you were more astute. We’re chairing First Night.” Guess Don hadn’t gotten the memo that the official word hadn’t been announced. The staff was keeping it mum until the whole kit and caboodle was ready for presentation.

Former Dallas Cowboy Flozell Adams with Marisa Ritter, Pat Holder and Wayne Ritter were at a high top near the table with Paul Divis and Randall Goss, who was solo. Randall’s wife Kara was spending quality time with her 12-year-old daughter Kate Peterson.

Flozell Adams and Marisa Ritter

Flozell Adams and Marisa Ritter

Lori Rakowitz  and Tiffany Divis

Lori Rakowitz and Tiffany Divis

Speaking of old-time relationships, Tiffany Divis was with her longtime buddy Lori Rakowitz.

In the entry area at a table for two, John Tesar was chomping on popcorn with Amy Vanderoef, while Debra Nelson was catching up friends on her recent vacation in Mexico.

David Tice, Debra Nelson, John Tesar and Amy Vanderoef

David Tice, Debra Nelson, John Tesar and Amy Vanderoef

After enough wine had been served, it was just about time for Gary to present his insights. First, there was an auction of all types of goodies from the Dallas Film Society, Studio Movie Grill and Boulevardier Dallas.

After giving a brief run through of his life prior to the night, Gary told of his attending the Oscars. Highlights of his talk included:

  • He admitted that he never went inside the theater for the Oscar presentation. Instead, he did the red carpet interviews. One time he was standing on the red carpet with the BBC on one side and Women’s Wear Daily on the other. Tom Cruise twirled Nicole Kidman and she turned to WWD about her outfit and Tom chatted with Gary. Surprised, Gary asked Tom what he was wearing. Tom replied, “Tom Ford and what are you wearing, Gary?” Gary’s response: “Culwell and Son [in] Snider Plaza.”
  • Every year following the presentation, Marcia Gay Harden would seek him out and kiss him on the lips with her then-husband glowering.
  • Among the lineup of limousines delivering guests at the Spielberg after-party, Gary pulled up in a red Ford Fiesta.
  • Interviews: He liked Robin Williams, who would correspond with Gary’s daughter. He found Tommy Lee Jones to be difficult. Meryl Streep and George Clooney were dreams.
  • Comparison of 2013 to 2014 film season: 2013 was one of the best in the last 15 years. This year’s crop not so.
  • “American Sniper”: “American Sniper” was better than he thought it would be. “It’s a very conflicted thing. One of Clint Eastwood’s best.”
  • One of his favorites: “Begin Again”
  • Favorite movie of the year: “Birdman”
  • Most complete movie: “Imitation Game”

For his Oscar picks, he revealed:

  • Best original song: Song from “Selma” by John Legend
  • Best supporting actress: Patricia Arquette for “Boyhood”
  • Best supporting actor: J.K. Simmons in “Whiplash”
  • Best actress: Julianne Moore in “Still Alice”
  • Best actor: Michael Keaton in “Birdman”
  • Best movie: A tie between “Boyhood” or “Birdman”

In closing, Gary offered some movie etiquette tips that won’t be found in Emily Post. They are:

  • Turn off your cellphones in the theater. “When you hold it up to check your messages, you have turned on a beacon to about 10 rows behind you and it annoys everyone.”
  • Stop shaking the stupid ice in your cup. “You might as just go rattle the wall.”
  • Stop shaking your popcorn bag. At least, wait until the loud moments in the movie.
  • Stop ordering theater nachos because “the jalapenos stink for about five rows.”

And by the way, all the auction items went for more than the value prices. In fact the DFS package for the Dallas International Film Festival passes was sold twice.

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Taste America

According to James Beard Award winning chef Stephan Pyles,

Stephan Pyles (File photo)

Stephan Pyles (File photo)

Café Momentum is a restaurant and culinary training facility that transforms young lives by equipping at-risk youth with life skills, social skills, educational and employment opportunities. I am pleased to announce that Café Momentum is partnering with the James Beard Foundation’s Taste America, a national epicurean tour presented by Chase Sapphire Preferred Visa Signature, where nationally known chef Patrick O’Connell of The Inn at Little Washington, will collaborate with me to create a one-of-a-kind, four-course dining experience for 300 lucky guests.

“The Night of Culinary Stars will be in the Wedgwood Room at the Hilton Anatole Hotel on Friday, September 26. This unique partnering of culinary greats will feature a tasting reception where Tim Byers of Smoke, Omar Flores of Casa Rubio, Matt McCallister of FT33, Janice Provost of Parigi and David Uyger of Lucia will dazzle guests with their own individual culinary styles-with the assistance of Café Momentum students.

Omar Flores, Janice Provost , Matt, David Uygar, Stephan Pyles and Tim Byres (File photo)

Omar Flores, Janice Provost , Matt, David Uygar, Stephan Pyles and Tim Byres (File photo)

“This is a particularly meaningful partnership as Café Momentum has just signed a permanent lease for their new facility and the organization has received a $487,000 grant from Crystal Charity to expand their programming to include young women from Letot Girls Residential Center.

“The evening’s proceeds will benefit the James Beard Foundation’s Educational and Award programs and Café Momentum, will receive a portion of proceeds as the local charitable partner. The evening’s festivities include the cocktail-tasting hour, silent auction, brief live auction and the sumptuous dinner.

“As an added incentive, guests who purchase All-Start Level Tickets ($500) will be invited to an exclusive Patron Reception, on the evening prior to the dinner, at Ser Steak+Spirits restaurant at the Anatole. Please visit jbftasteamerica.org for tickets or additional information.”

JUST IN: James Beard Foundation’s “Taste America: Local Flavors From Coast To Coast” Is Coming To Dallas This September

Some of the area’s finest chefs and foodies gathered Wednesday night at Stephan Pyles’ San Salvaje to learn the news about this Fall’s James Beard Foundation’s Taste America: “Local Flavors From Coast To Coast.” To the gourmets, this is like winning the Republican Convention, Final Four or Olympics.

Dallas scored thumbs-up across the boards. Yes, Dallas will be one of the 10 cities in the two-day program, which includes a special evening starting off with a walk-around tasting reception from a lineup of local chefs, followed by a collaborative four-course dinner crafted by a Taste America All-Star and a local celebrity chef.

The Dallas event starts on “Friday, September 26, in the Wedgwood Room of the Hilton Anatole with ‘A Night of Culinary Stars,’ an exclusive dining event benefiting the James Beard Foundation in partnership with Café Momentum.”

Omar Flores, Janice Provost , Matt, David Uygar, Stephan Pyles and Tim Byres

Omar Flores, Janice Provost , Matt, David Uygar, Stephan Pyles and Tim Byres

The chefs for the reception of tasties will be Omar Flores of Casa Rubia, Matt McCallister of FT33, Janice Provost of Parigi , David Uygar of Lucia, Teiichi Sakurai of Tei-An and James Beard Award winner Tim Byres of Smoke.

Stephan Pyles

Stephan Pyles

Afterwards, guests will be seated for an exceptional dinner prepared by Taste America All-Star Patrick O’Connell of the Inn at Little Washington and hometown chef extraordinaire Stephan Pyles, both James Beard Award winners.

The next day there will be a series of free, in-store consumer events at Sur La Table including a cooking demonstration with Patrick, book signings, tasting from local producers and artisans and much more.

As you know, the Wedgwood Room ain’t the Chantilly, so seating will be very limited. Translation: get those reservations in and start dieting.

Crystal Charity Ball Gals Catch A Bus To Get A Firsthand Look At The CCB’s 2014 Beneficiaries

Thursday, February 20th was a glorious day in Dallas. The sun was shining. The temperature nearing the 70’s was like a cute cheerleader flirting with the winning quarterback.

Pam Busbee

Pam Busbee

A bus was parked in Turtle Creek Village acting like a magnet. As cars parked near and far, the drivers headed to the bus. The occasion was the Crystal Charity Ball bus tour, where CCB committee members visit the year’s beneficiaries to get a first-hand look. Tour organizer Pam Busbee had arranged for a stellar opportunity to understand, to learn and to be inspired to raise millions of dollars for the area’s children’s charities at the December 6th fundraiser.

Amy Hegi

Amy Hegi

In between site visits, the CCB-ers learn about the new members. This year’s CCB Chair Robyn Conlon‘s internal-working theme of baseball deemed the new kids on the block (Tiffany Divis, Gail Fischer, Amy Hegi, Leigh Anne Haugh, Angela Nash, Mary Martha Pickens and Lauryn Gayle White) as the “2104 Rookies of the Year.” Each had her own baseball card with photo.

But before even boarding the bus, a chuckle was shared by the CCB’ers by the sign on the windshield reading, “Cristal Charity Ball.” Guess it was created by a champagne-loving non-member.

Bus signage

Bus signage

As the bus motor idled at 9:30 a.m., so did the 60 folks in the bus outside World Market. The first beneficiary on the docket was Café Momentum, the restaurant facility that “provides post-release paid culinary internships for juvenile offenders through which they receive intensive training, mentoring and support to foster successful re-entry into the community.” Instead of visiting CM’s current facility, CM mastermind charming Chad Houser was going to come to the bus to explain the operation. Alas, the ladies waited and waited, but Chad never appeared. Luckily, when the time for departure for the first site visit was nearing, CCB member Patti Flowers subbed in for Chad, explaining that CCB’s $487,640 would be used “to provide pre-and and post-release culinary job and work readiness training for juvenile offenders.”

Patti Flowers

Patti Flowers

After Patti’s talk, the bus headed to South Oak Cliff and the first stop — the construction site for Los Barrios Unidos Community Clinic. Barrios Director of Development and Marketing Joleen Bagwell was right at the curb to greet and hug the CCB-ers as they disembarked the bus. Providing “culturally competent primary health care and supportive assistance to the most at-risk, uninsured and under-insured populations in Dallas,” Los Barrios Unidos has two clinics in West Dallas and Grand Prairies. CCB’s funds ($603,543) will “be used to launch the first two years of pediatric staffing” in the new 21,400-square-foot clinic that is scheduled to open early in 2015.

Future site of Los Barrios

Future site of Los Barrios

Joleen Bagwell

Joleen Bagwell

Walking Los Barrios site

Walking Los Barrios site

Luckily, the CCB-ers are old hands at walking sites and manage to walk the construction site with its bulldozers and equipment to learn how nearly 5,000 children from birth to age 17 will be served thanks to their support.

Next stop on the schedule was Mercy Street in West Dallas. Talk about being organized, thrilled and grateful! As the CCB gals left the bus, they were greeted by a line of greeters who would make Dale Carnegie grads look downright shy. Hands were shook. Smiles were exchanged. Eye contact was without a blink.

Mercy Street welcome committee

Mercy Street welcome committee

Bill Farrell and Annie Roberson

Bill Farrell and Annie Roberson

Bell

Bell

Trey Hill

Trey Hill

With laser efficiency, the visitors were divided into groups and sent to various areas of the facility. There the Mercy representatives talked about various facets of the program. To keep things on schedule, a bell in the hallway would ring at five-minute intervals advising groups to move to their next station. For the Mercy team, every second counted in showcasing their “foundational mentoring program that matches adult Christian mentors with incoming 4th graders in the Pinkston High School feeder pattern.” According to Mercy Street Director Trey Hill, “In the 11.5-square-mile area that comprises West Dallas, less than 50% of residents have a high school diploma. To address the alarming drop-out rate and build a generation of future community leaders, Mercy Street recruits mentors to journey with students through 12th grade, along the path to graduation.”

Thanks to the money provided by CCB, $733,533 will “be used to fully cover the costs of the mentoring program in three current DISD partnering schools and to expand to one additional school. Approximately 400 children in 4th through 12th grade will be served.”

Even as the visitors left, the Mercy team was outside against with handshakes, smiles and thank you’s.

Tire store

Tire store

West Dallas neighborhood

West Dallas neighborhood

West Dallas neighborhood

West Dallas neighborhood

Just a bit down the road, past small neighborhood stores, worn-out houses and dogs wandering the streets, the bus pulled up to 3111 N. Winnetka, where a little cottage stood. There Wesley-Rankin Community Center’s Sarah Squires greeted the CCB-ers in front of the bungalow with its porch. Back in 1935, the area had been known as “Devil’s Doorstep” because of the “gangsters who claimed this neighborhood.” Things took a turn when Hattie Rankin “committed to education and compassion for children who had few choices beyond gangs and poverty.” It was about this time that Ray Hamilton, who was part of the Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker gang, was sentenced to die. Hattie learned of Ray’s grieving mother, who lived in the area. So, she drove her Model A Ford to the mother’s home and “comforted and ministered to the grief-stricken woman. She prayed with the family during the long night of Ray Hamilton’s execution and helped arrange his funeral.”

3111 North Winnetka

3111 North Winnetka

Sarah Squires

Sarah Squires

Wesley Rankin classroom

Wesley Rankin classroom

Wesley Rankin

Wesley Rankin

Hattie even “reached out to Mrs. Henry Barrow,” Clyde’s mother, who lived in the neighborhood.  According to Sarah, the innocent looking bungalow’s porch is where Clyde gunned down Tarrant County Deputy Malcolm Davis in 1933.

Crystal Charity Ball strolling to Wesley-Rankin Community Center

Crystal Charity Ball strolling to Wesley-Rankin Community Center

Sarah then led the group around the block to the Wesley-Rankin Community Center, where the CCB funds will be used “over two years to help establish an early childhood education center in West Dallas in collaboration with East Dallas Community Schools and the Center for Communities and Education at SMU.” Approximately 314 children from birth to age 9 will be served.

Di Johnston

Di Johnston

But no dawdling was allowed and the CCB-ers once again boarded the bus and had box lunches from Cassandra’s as the bus rolled to the under-construction Texas Horse Park for a presentation by Equest. There was a slight hiccup. Seems the CCB bus wasn’t allowed on the property due to the construction, and Equest CEO Patrick Bricker with hardhat on head was waiting for the bus to show up “on the property.” Thanks to cell phones, connections were made resulting in a presentation plus a gift made on board the bus with cows, goats and horses grazing across the road, where a sign read, “To All Children, Don’t Sell Dope. . . Sell Goats!!”

Don't sell dope. . . Sell Goats

Don’t sell dope. . . Sell Goats

Future site of Texas Horse Park

Future site of Texas Horse Park

Construction site of Texas Horse Park

Construction site of Texas Horse Park

Robyn Conlon and Equest gift

Robyn Conlon and Equest gift

The CCB-ers learned about Equest’s new program at the park in South Dallas’ Trinity River Corridor. With the CCB’s $851,500, Equest will be able to “provide traditional equine-assisted therapy, including therapeutic sports riding and Hippotherapy, to the underserved areas of South and West Dallas” for approximately 3,725 children ages 2 to 18 over two years.

Future home of Vogel Alcove

Future home of Vogel Alcove

Bathroom for toddler

Bathroom for toddler

Karen Hughes

Karen Hughes

Next stop was the Vogel Alcove’s facility in South Dallas. Formerly City Park Elementary School, the newly renovated 55,000-square-foot building amazed those who had known it in its previous life. From the red brick to the windows, everything had a polished sheen to it. Ah, but inside was even more startling. Such little things like toddler bathrooms, pint-sized lockers and munchkin-designed tiled walls were all in their final stages of completion for the March move-in. The CCB-ers were once again divided into groups to tour the building. Vogel Alcove President/Director Karen Hughes told her group how when singer Sarah McLaughlin had toured the building, she was so impressed that she donated a piano.

According to Vogel Alcove fans, it will continue its 26 years of providing “free quality child development services for the young victims of poverty: homeless children, who represent 22% of all homeless in Dallas. It is the only comprehensive early childhood education program in Dallas whose primary focus is to provide free childcare and case management for children and their families referred by 21 local organizations serving homeless families.”

With CCB’s $741,380, Vogel Alcove’s The Soar Program will “provide two new service components for children who have transitioned either into permanent housing or into kindergarten and elementary school; extended early childhood education for preschoolers; and enrichment, tutoring and summer camps for school-age children.” The money will also provide the creation of a “trauma-informed classroom for preschoolers which blends mental health and academic services.” As a result, approximately 120 children ages 3 to 11 will be served over a two-year period.

Jim Lozier

Jim Lozier

Keeping to schedule, the bus headed to Dallas CASA’s soon-to-be-opened building near the Wilson Historic District in East Dallas. As spectacular as the 25,000-square-foot facility was, it was the message delivered by volunteer Campaign Chair Jim Lozier that really stood out. Since 1979, Dallas CASA has been on the frontline advocating for “the best interests of abused and neglected children in protective care to help them find safe, permanent homes.” The group learned that “on an average day in Dallas County, more than 2,000 abused and neglected children live in foster care because they cannot live safely at home. Three out of five abused children are waiting for a CASA.”

CASA office space

CASA office space

But to handle this demand required 31 supervisors and 600 CASAs (Court Appointed Special Advocates), and they had simply run out of space in their old digs on Gaston Avenue. Thus a major campaign had been undertaken resulting in the two-story building and enabling Dallas CASA to “double the agency’s capacity, allowing them within five years to serve every abused children who needs a CASA.”

At one point on the tour, the CCB’ers were shown the 3,327-square-foot supervisor’s wing on the second floor of the building that the CCB’s $960,290 helped “cover the capitals costs” for. Thanks to this funding, 3,900 children from birth to age 18 will be served by 2019.

Outside the shiny new CASA headquarters, the gals gathered for the traditional group photo. To accomplish this feat, photographer Holt Haynsworth required a ladder that was quickly provided by the construction team putting the final touches on CASA.

2014 Crystal Charity Ball bus tour group photo

2014 Crystal Charity Ball bus tour group photo

As the group boarded the bus one last time, they knew they had their work cut out for them. While some were disappointed not to have seen one child during their 6-hour tour, all knew that countless children today and in the years to come would benefit from their fundraising.