Get Down To Earth And Join Up For The Trinity River Conservation Corps’ Corporate Day Of Service

As daunting as tending to a backyard garden is, just imagine trying to take care of acreage along the Trinity River Corridor. There were more than 400 folks and 42 companies that last year learned just how amazing the task is. The occasion was the Trinity River Conservation Corps’ 2nd Annual Corporate Day of Service, when folks like Southwest Airlines Chairman/CEO Gary  Kelly collected “10,000 pounds of trash and invasive species and made thousands of seed balls to disburse in the corridor.”

Gary Kelly shoveling*

Launched in 2013 thanks to a three-year gift of $150,000 from Southwest Airlines to the Trinity Park Conservancy (formerly known as The Trinity Trust Foundation), the grant was made for the creation of the Trinity River Conservation Corps to clean and conserve Dallas’ Trinity River Corridor.

That first year, “hundreds of Southwest Airlines volunteers cleaned and cleared the Cedar Creek Overlook, giving their time from the heart. The group helped restore this riparian area by planting 400 love (or LUV) grass plants and 100 native blooming and non blooming species provided by the Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research Facility.”

The next year, the first Corporate Day of Service was officially established with 15 local companies and over 75 participants collecting 1.5 tons of trash and invasive species and planting hundreds of native plants along the Trinity Skyline Trail. 

Unfortunately, due to the 2015 flooding, the effort was put on hiatus until April 2016, when things literally picked up again.

This year’s Corporate Day of Service will take place on Friday, April 7, starting at 8:30 a.m. at the Trinity River Corridor, Moore Park Gateway and Santa Fe Trestle Trail, 1837 E. 8th Street. Kicking things off will be remarks by Trinity River Conservancy VP/Boone Family Foundation President Garrett Boone.

The TRCC will provide the shovels and equipment and you’ll just need to dress casually with closed-toed shoes, long pants and gloves.

The event will be a done deal by noon, so you can toddle off with your buddies for a celebration lunch or just take the rest of the day off.

In addition to 250 volunteers and companies (City of Dallas, Downtown Dallas Inc., Energy in Action, Hayden Consultants, HDR Inc., Muse Integration and TXU Energy) having already signed up to participate, the following sponsors have come on board:

  • Founding Sponsor: Southwest Airlines
  • River Sponsor ($2,500): Quiling, Selander, Lownds, Winslett And Moser P.C.
  • Wetland Sponsor ($1,000): HDR Engingeering Inc. and Oaxaca Interest LLC
  • Steam Sponsor ($500): Connectrac and Tenet Healthcare
  • In-Kind Sponsor: City of Dallas, Groundwork Dallas and Kroger
  • Media Sponsor: MySweetCharity

Why not get your pals together, plaster on some sunscreen and help bring the best out in the Trinity Corridor? For more info about registration and sponsorships, check out Trinity River Conservation Corps or call Tierney Kaufman Hutchins at 214.720.1616.

* Photo provided by Trinity River Conservancy

 

2017 CancerBlows Committee Tackles Everything From Coordinating World-Class Musicians’ Scheduling To Busing Kids In

Putting on a one-day-only event is tough. Managing all the logistics is like juggling cactus. But a multi-day venture ramps all those headaches to migraine status. So, the CancerBlows team has been orchestrating all the arrangements of bringing in world-class trumpet players for its May 8th-May 10th fundraising activities for The Ryan Anthony Foundation.

But it’s all underway, thanks to CancerBlows Co-Founders Niki and Ryan Anthony and Co-Chairs D’Andra Simmons-Lock and Jeremy Lock and Anne and Steve Stodghill and the legion of volunteers, committee members and sponsors raising funds to battle multiple myeloma.

How about an example? On Tuesday, May 9, there will be a series of free Education Events including

  • Chamber Music Master Class — CancerBlows artists affiliated with chamber music groups such as Canadian Brass, Boston brass, Rhythm and Brass and more work with collegiate brass quintets.
  • Panel Discussion with CancerBlows Artists — Public Q&A session with CancerBlows artists. Topics include warm-up techniques, making a living as a freelancer and professionalism in the workplace.
  • CancerBlows Jazz Master Class — CancerBlows artists work with pre-selected high school and collegiate trumpet players with emphasis on jazz.
  • Cancer Blows Classical Master Class — Cancer Blows artists work with pre-selected high school and collegiate trumpet players with a classical emphasis.
  • CancerBlows Big Band/Jazz Artist rehearsal — Select local high school and college students are invited to watch the first half of the CancerBlows Big Band and Jazz Artist rehearsal.
  • Lessons With the Legends* — Select CancerBlows Legends will make lesson times available to individuals.

Ryan Anthony

Niki Anthony

Tim Andersen

David Cowling

That all sounds like it covers all the bases, but then how do you transport the students to the events? That was one of the  questions addressed at a meeting of volunteers on Monday, February 27, at Jones Day including Niki, Ryan, David Cowling, Todd Ranta and Tim Andersen.

The answer seemed simple — just use school buses. Not so fast. It was to take place on a school day, and the school buses’ priority was busing students home. And you just thought carpool was a challenge! But not to worry. The team handled the challenge, so the kids wouldn’t miss out.

BTW, if you want to be part of the committee putting this mega-fundraiser together to fight multiple myeloma, you’ll be hanging out with Jenna Alexander, Larry Alexander, Diane and Joel Allison, Niki and Ryan Anthony, Deidre and Chris Bacala, Jamie Jo Boulogne, Laura and Bob Beard, Diane and Hal Brierley, Christen Casenave, Jennifer and Coley Clark, Rozalyn and Robert Colombo, Phyllis and CJ Comu, Megan and Michael Considine, John Conn, Lisa and Clay Cooley, Amy Youngquist and David Cowling, Serena and Tom Connelly, Roberta Corbett, Barbara and Don Daseke, Pam and Mark Denesuk, Cary and Mark Deuber, Heidi and Bill Dillon, Dean Dimmitt, Noelle and David Dunavan, Claire and Dwight Emanuelson, Ashley Berges and Greg Fasullo, Lora Farris, Michelle and Kevin Finamore, Holly Forsythe, Emily and Darryl Freeling, Don Gaiser, Hadley and Travis Galt, Shay and Brian Geyer, Sally and Mark Helm, Julie and Ken Hersh, Stephanie and Travis Hollman, Peggy and Tim Horner, Kristi and Ron Hoyl, Colleen O’Conner and Joe Hubach, Laree Hulshoff and Ben Fischer, Linda and Steve Ivy, Lindsay and Chuck Jacaman, Wendy and Michael Jenkins, Kathie and Randy King, Maggie Kipp, Jeri and David Kleiman, Richard Stanley and Matthew Kline, Allan Knight and Cearan Henley, Tracy and Ben Lange, Julian Leaver, Susan and Dean McSherry, Alison and Mike Malone, Rhonda and Fraser Marcus, Amy and Jonathan Martin, Sarah Catherine Norris, Delia Parman and Robert Kyle, Leah and Jim Pasant, Cyndi Phelps, Terri and Brad Phillips, Mary Martha and John Pickens, Brian Ratner, Stacey and John Relton, Melody and Rick Rogers, Carla Ferrer and Joe Russo, Susan Post Sanford, Lisa Simmons, Lisa and Marvin Singleton, Linda and Thomas Smith, Hamilton A. Sneed, Cindy Stager, Tara and Harvey Stotland, Aneeta and Sandy Sule, Elisa and Stephen Summers, Patti Flowers and Tom Swiley, Ellen and Larry Talley, Jill Tananbaum, Rachel and Christopher Trowbridge, Ashley Tatum and New Walker, Nikki and Crayton Webb, Kameron and Court Westcott and Piper and Mike Wyatt.

Contact Niki for information on how to sign up.

* There is a fee for the lesson and available times are very limited.

Junior League Of Dallas To Receive Dallas CASA’s 2017 Judge Barefoot Sanders Champion of Children Award In November

The Junior Leaguers of Dallas are going to be busy raising money this coming week. First, there is the 55th Annual black-tie ball — Encore — on Saturday, March 4, at the Hilton Anatole. Then next Wednesday, March 8, they’re putting on the 88th Linz Award Luncheon honoring sister JLD-er Lyda Hill at the Omni Dallas.

Dallas CASA Champion of Children Award Dinner*

After all this work, they’re going to be the recipients of Dallas CASA’s “Judge Barefoot Sanders Champion of Children Award” at The Fairmont Hotel on Thursday, November 16, at CASA’s annual Champion of Children Award Dinner.

Since 1996, JLD and Dallas CASA have worked together “to serve more children in protective care, [a figure that] has grown year over year. In 2016, the JLD provided 38 volunteers who became sworn advocates for children. In addition, annual grants from the JLD directed toward recruiting allowed Dallas CASA to recruit many additional community members to serve as advocates, helping propel the agency toward its goal of serving every child in protective care.”

Junior Leaguers of Dallas*

Christie Carter (File photo)

According to JLD President Bonner Allen, “The Junior League of Dallas is both honored and humbled to be recognized by Dallas CASA. The work Dallas CASA volunteers do for the most vulnerable children in our community is exactly what the mission of the Junior Leagues is about — it is improving the community through effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.”

Appropriately the honorary chair for the event will Christie Carter, who in addition to being a longtime Dallas CASA supporter, is also past president of the JLD, served on various boards and chaired this past year’s Crystal Charity Ball. It should be noted that she also co-chaired the “recently concluded $37M Abused Children Can’t Wait — The Campaign for Dallas CASA, which saw Dallas CASA more than double it program capacity, dramatically grow the number of volunteer advocates and move into a much larger building to accommodate the rapid growth.”

Priscilla and Corey Anthony*

John and Laura Losinger*

Champion of Children co-chairs will be Priscilla and Corey Anthony and Laura and John Losinger.

* Graphic and photos provided by Dallas CASA

Junior Leaguers Of Dallas Held Their Annual Community Volunteer Fair After Handing Out More Than $770,000 Checks To 39 Nonprofits

Just before NorthPark Center merchants officially opened for business on Saturday, February 4, the Junior Leaguers of Dallas were making 39 non-profit organizations very happy at Green House Market. In addition to supporting the organizations with more than a thousand volunteer hours by its membership, they also handed over checks thanks to funds raised throughout the year. But, alas, the JLD-ers couldn’t stay too long to accept thank yous. They had to head to NorthPark’s NorthCourt for the JLD’s annual Community Volunteer Fair. Here’s a report from the field about the grant presentation:

The Junior League of Dallas held its 2017-2018 Community Grant Presentation at Green House Market in NorthPark Center the morning of Saturday, February 4. The presentation kicked off with a welcome by Junior League of Dallas President Bonner Allen, who was joined by sponsor, Bank of Texas’ Dallas Market Executive Bob White, and WFAA Channel 8 Morning Anchor Alexa Conomos, who served as emcee. Representatives from the 39 partner agencies, which were carefully chosen by the JLD Research and Development Committee, were in attendance to receive grants for the 2017-2018 year.

The Community Grant Program represents more than $770,000 in funding and 1,165 trained volunteer placements within these partner agencies. The League will also provide additional funds and volunteers to the community through its Signature Projects: Grants for Innovative Teaching, Women LEAD, Kids in the Kitchen, the Community Assistance Fund, and its Provisional and Transfer Projects. In total, the JLD will give more than $1 million and more than 1,200 volunteers to the Dallas community in 2017-2018.

Jennifer Tobin, Brandy Patrick, Bonner Allen, Bob White, Alexa Conomos and Elizabeth Allen*

Members of the Research and Development Committee, led by R&D Chair Brandy Patrick and Community Vice President Elizabeth Allen, spent countless hours deliberating between agencies in order to determine those that not only share the same vision for a better Dallas, but that focus on the six issue areas the Junior League of Dallas supports. These issue areas include: violence intervention, poverty intervention, health, family preservation, education, and arts and cultural enrichment.

The Junior League of Dallas is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.

“Our agencies often tell us that the partnership with the Junior League of Dallas is invaluable; that the gift of our time and resources helps them bridge the gap between their capacity and our shared vision for a better Dallas,” said Bonner. “It is that shared vision that inspires our work, motivates us through the years and is what brings us here today.”

Alexa added: “Every day at WFAA we share stories that impact our community.  Stories that touch issues such as violence, poverty, health, family, education and arts.  We are grateful for organizations like the Junior League of Dallas who are partners with our community agencies in the mission to make Dallas the community of choice and a place of opportunity for all.”

Kathleen LaValle and Angela Nash*

Guests included: JLD President-Elect Jennifer Tobin, JLD Communications Vice President Jennifer Scripps, JLD Financial Vice President Melissa Wickham, JLD Sustainer President Kittye Peeler, Melissa Sherrill Martin of The Family Place, Amy Hatfield of Ronald McDonald House, Judy Wright of Promise House, Jan Langbein of Genesis Women’s Shelter, Kelly Cruse of New Friends New Life, Carolyn Jordan and Desiree Jacobson of Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas, Benaye Rogers of St. Philips School and Community Center, Jennifer Doggett of Community Partners of Dallas, Lili Kellogg of Equest, Angela Nash of Methodist Health System Foundation, Stephanie Brigger of Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Caroline Law of Parkland Foundation; Ester Harrison of Interfaith Family Services, Kathleen LaValle of Dallas CASA, Shannon Fisher of Texas Health Resources Foundation and many more.

* Photo credit: Tamytha Cameron Smith

 

Sold-Out Alert!: 2017 Soup’s On!

Two of the most wonderful words in fundraising were making the rounds at the Soup’s On! patron party tonight — “Sold Out!”

Yup! If you thought this chilly-willy weather had inspired you to get a soup bowl spot or two at Union Station on Tuesday, January 31, open up a can of Campbell’s and cry in your ho-hum soup bowl.

Julie Marshall, Brian Luscher and Heather Sauber

According to the 9th Annual Soup’s On! Chair Heather Sauber, it’s sold out with 642 bowls in need of filling and a panel discussion on Dallas’ homeless situation with a stellar group of veterans in the issue scoring headlines locally.

Congrats to Heather, The Stewpot Alliance President Julie Marshall, adorable Honorary Co-Chairs Margie and Ray Francis and Souper-Duper Chief Chef Brian Luscher and his team of chefs on scoring the very first “Sold Out” of 2017 in Dallas fundraising.

Let’s keep these “Sold-Out Alerts” coming on in.

Crystal Charity Ball Had Fashions Springing Everywhere, A Winter Wonderland Blast On The Dance Floor And Falling Seasons

The much vaunted children’s nonprofit fundraiser, Crystal Charity Ball, was just an hour away on Saturday, December 3. But before the festivities got underway and while guests were on their way to the Hilton Anatole, there was a seated dinner taking place in a private dining room high atop the hotel in Sēr. The guests were the men and women who are off-duty members of Dallas law enforcement involved in the logistics of the annual ball. The supper was the brainchild of CCB office manager Cindy Ethel and the CCB committee “in appreciation for our friends in law enforcement.” Following the shootings of July 7 in downtown Dallas, an email was sent to the CCB membership with the idea of providing a nice meal for the two dozen members of the security team including Steve Walthall, Eric Jez, Dan Mosher and Reginald Luster and inviting support. The response was so overwhelming that it more than paid for the supper.

Dan Mosher and Reginald Luster

And what a feast it was. Upon taking their places around the table, they were presented with a menu of courses — Starter (jumbo lump crab cake or grilled shrimp cocktail), Second (petite greens or roasted pumpkin bisque), Entrée (filet of beef, Atlantic salmon, confit turkey breast or prime rib) and Dessert (Bumbleberry cobbler of chocolate). Afterward, one of the diners fessed up with a big smile, “I’m stuffed.” And, no, there was no alcohol served, just in case you were wondering.

Elizabeth Gambrell, Kristina Whitcomb, Christie Carter, Claire Emanuelson, Susan Farris and Ola Fojasek

Downstairs the finishing touches were underway. Outside the ballroom the reception area reflected 2016 Crystal Charity Ball Chair Christie Carter’s theme — “To Everything There is a Season.” In the entry, four young women representing each of the seasons took their places as living statues on pedestals in alcoves located along the hall. Serving as a backdrop for the receiving line was a screen with a digital tree going through the seasonal changes.

Spring

Winter

Autumn

Summer

Against scenery of orange, gold and fall trees, the silent auction with its hundreds of goodies on tables with autumn-colored tablecloths was all ready for the bidding to begin. On the other side of the lobby was a summer garden with planters of sunflowers and lattice and another scenic backdrop of green and yellow-tinged trees and grounds for the casino and boutique. In the reception area in front of the ballroom were mountains of shrimp, mini-Reuben sandwiches and crostini with cheese and sun-dried tomato staged on tables with tablecloths of faux green leaves and oversized, stair-step centerpieces of flowers that reminded one of a French countryside picnic in spring.

Within the Chantilly Ballroom, winter was in its final stages of completion. The Dallas Chamber Symphony  and the James Davis Orchestra under the direction of Richard McKay were doing one last rehearsal of the 22-minute composition created for the evening. Behind the orchestra a mammoth screen displayed a video appearing to transport the orchestra through various snow scenes.

(Back story on Richard’s involvement with the event: CCB Chair Christie’s late mother had been a musician and over the years Richard had worked with her. In turn, Christie joined the board of the Dallas Chamber Symphony and was very supportive of the organization. So, the performance by the Symphony under the direction of Richard was a very personal one for Christie, Richard and the musicians.)

Perhaps it was traveling through the wintry wonderland or the Anatole’s A/C providing a true wintry feeling, but the Chantilly Ballroom was not suffering from a fever.

Matching the seasons perfectly were the fashions, jewels and extra touches like Lynn McBee in Dries Van Noten, Tucker Enthoven and past Ball Chair Robyn Conlon in Carolina Herrera, Gina Betts in Oscar, Piper Wyatt in Zac Posen, Claire Emanuelson in Jenny Packham, Ciara Cooley in Marchesa and Janet Brock in Brunello Cucinelli.

Robyn and Don Conlon

Crawford and Janet Brock

And the ladies kept local designers on pins and needles in the weeks and months preceding the fundraiser. Designer Patti Flowers created the gowns for Ball Chair Christie, Robin Carreker and Lisa Cooley  and “re-designed vintage gowns” for Mary Meier Evans and Pat Harloe. And, of course, Patti wore one of her own. Lisa Cooley’s turquoise gown had heads turning to catch the pink floral bustle. Since it was a seasonal theme, Lisa wanted just a touch of spring.

Lisa Cooley

Michal Powell

Fellow designer Michael Faircloth’s handiwork was worn by Lisa Troutt, Tiffany Divis and last year’s Ball Chair Michal Powell, who didn’t hesitate to say that she had gone the spring route with a white, off-the-shoulder lace blouse and vivid purple skirt that would have made Ray Rim Purple Petunias jealous. Coming handy for the pooch-loving Michal was her Leiber-designed Shih Tzu purse.

Pam Busbee

Alicia Wood

When it came to competition, Pam Busbee‘s black gown with red roses was a showstopper, but  Alicia Wood’s Narda’s train won hands down for length. She admitted after kicking it aside a couple of times that she would probably end up just picking it up and hauling it around.  

As for the accessories of the night, Jimmy Choos, Alexander McQueens, Manola Blahniks, Pradas, Stuart Weitzmans, Louboutins, Nichols Kirkwoods and Alaias were seen peaking from under hems. And hands down the handiest item of the night were the Judith Leiber purses. There were so many of the Leiber sparkling bags that the company should be one of the event’s underwriters!

Tucker and Rich Enthoven

Lisa and Kenny Troutt

Amit and Liat Berger and Stacy and David Blank

Adding to the evening look’s highlights were the array of jewelry from Susan Saffron (Tucker Enthoven), Sue Gragg (Gina Betts and Lisa Troutt), Diamonds Direct (Liat Berger, Stacy Blank, Tanya Foster and Alicia Wood), Eiseman (Claire Emanuelson), Bachendorf (Katy Bock), 64 Facets (Janet Brock) and Matthew Trent and Bulgari (Lynn McBee).

As for the gents, it was tuxedo alley — Nick Evan subbing in for Allan McBee in a Tom Ford tuxedo with Lynn McBee, Kenny Troutt in J. Hilburn, Dwight Emanuelson in Tux Cucinelli, Clay Cooley in Chris Despos, Chase Cooley in Q Clothiers and Ken Betts, Charles McEvoy and Loyd Powell in Zegna. However, a couple of the fellas — Chris O’Neill, Billy Esping, Bill Goodwin, Michael Sills, Paul Coggins, John Lemak, Pete Cline, Rich Sterling, Jerry Fronterhouse, Bob White, Robin Robinson and Ben Lange —  broke from the traditional black tie by adding a little color to their wardrobes thanks to natty ties.

Pete and Caren Kline and Regina Montoya and Paul Coggins

Robin and Debby Robinson

Chris and Connie O’Neill

Billy and Heather Esping

Mimi and Rich Sterling

Annette Simmons and Jerry Fronterhouse

Bill and Margo Goodwin

As folks posed for photos in front of the ever-changing tree, it proved comical as some appeared to be sprouting a tree out of the top of their well-coiffed heads.

John Clutts, Jill Rowlett, Richard Eiseman, Dee Wyly and Sami Asrlanlar

As guests arrived, there were the traditional photos opps with Christie and then there was the photo bombing by the likes of Richard Eiseman.

Caroline Rose Hunt and Del Frnka

Just seconds after Carolina Rose Hunt and escort Del Frnka arrived, the winter living statue took an unplanned break requiring assistance. Luckily, Dr. Dan Kadesky was nearby and came to assist the season, who was ushered away. A few minutes later Fall followed suit, leaving Spring and Summer standing in place.

From the left: (front row) Margo Goodwin, Barbara Stuart, Robyn Conlon, Christie Carter, Tom Addis, Connie O’Neill, Louise Griffeth, Lindalyn Adams and Nancy Chapman; (back row) Sara Martineau, Gloria Eulich Martindale, Aileen Pratt, Tincy Miller, Michael Powell, Connie O’Neill and Caren Kline

At one point in the evening, it was time for the group photos of the past CCB chairs with Christie. Gathering these ladies up made herding hummingbirds look easy. No sooner would one be found than another one would disappear surrounded by a group of friends. Finally, they thought all were present except for Jill Smith. No one had seen her and it was getting near time to open the doors to the ballroom. The photos had to be taken. After being positioned on the staircase and the photos done, the ladies insisted that the man who had handheld so many of them in years past, event producer Tom Addis, join them for one final snap. Then they were off in different directions. Alas, Jill arrived minutes later. Seems that she and husband Bob Smith had been the victims of a traffic jam.

Crystal Charity Ball dining table

Just before the doors opened to the wintry wonderland, the ballroom appeared to shimmer thanks to the white floral arrangements with touches of pink, the tables with gold tablecloths and white chairs and the walls covered in white draping cast in a flood of lavender lighting.  For Angel of Grace sponsor Annette Simmons and her tablemates (husband Jerry Fronterhouse, Anita and Truman Arnold, Kelli and Jerry Ford and Gail and Gerald Turner, the cloth napkins were monogrammed with Annette’s initials.

Monogrammed napkin

Jerry and Kelli Ford

Truman and Anita Arnold

Gail and Gerald Turner

When the doors opened, the orchestra started playing and the video scenery commenced to the wide-eyed guests’ delight. As one guest put it, “The ballroom was breathtaking. With that backdrop, it appeared as if the orchestra was traveling through a winter wonderland.”

Unlike years past when performers provided presentations, the orchestra and video eliminated the need to hold guests back from crossing the dance floor. It made moving throughout the room so much easier. However, some folks were so mesmerized by the 22-minute musical/digital performance that they just stood in place.

Randall and Kara Goss

Sherwood Wagner and Todd Clendening

David and Anne Sutherland

Aileen and Jack Pratt

Jason and Laura Downing and Brooke and Aaron Shelby

Eventually, guests like Debby and Robin Robinson, Kara and Randall Goss, Anne and David Sutherland, Phyllis Cole McKnight and Steve McKnight, Paige McDaniel with Joe B Clark, Laura and Jason Downing, Joanna Clarke, Sherwood Wagner with Todd Clendening, Mersina Stubbs with Mackay Boynton, Brooke and Aaron Shelby and Alison and Mike Malone  took their places for a menu that included First Course (Maine lobster salad, Belgian endive and frisee, watermelon radish, asparagus, confit tomato and shave fennel, pretzel crouton and Dijon herb vinaigrette), Second Course (Demi-glazed and roasted garlic crusted filet of beef, Gruyere-celery root pave, maple roasted parsnips, harvest squash and blistered red pepper, chard-filled golden tomato and green peppercorn glace) and Dessert (Peppermint white chocolate mousse, red velvet cake and linzer crisp).

Suzanne and Jim Johnston and Angela Nash

Norma Hunt

Dinner table chats included Travis Holman reported that after purchasing Lee Bailey‘s place on Turtle Creek, he was planning on expanding the three-car garage to six and other additions to the estate… Angela Nash introducing her new boss, Methodist Health System Foundation President Jim Johnston, and his wife Suzanne Johnston to friends… Norma Hunt being thanked for her donation of her Perfect Season wine for the CCB fundraiser.

Simply Irresistible

Kevin Dahlberg and Francie Moody-Dahlberg

Just as the Symphony completed its performance, the Simply Irresistible from Atlanta appeared on stage, changing the mood to Motown. The result? The dance floor that had glimmered like an ice rink was filled to capacity by the guests like Francie Moody-Dahlberg and Kevin Dahlberg, Mary Clare Finney, David Nichols, Diane and Hal Brierley, Julie and Ed Hawes, Debbie Oates, Carolyn and David Miller, Anne Davidson and Mark Porter and Tracy and Ben Lange. At one point it was so crowded that one woman who lost her footing would have normally landed flat on the floor. But in this case, it was so tight that she recovered before hitting the ground.  

Mary Clare Finney and David Nichols

And that wintry chill that had initially filled the ballroom was history. Thanks to the dance floor action, the room was heating up for partying long into the night, with the goal of providing more than $5.6M+ for Community Partners of Dallas, Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas, Hope Supply Co., Notre Dame School of Dallas, Parkland Foundation on behalf of Parkland Health and Hospital System, Teach for America, The Family Place and Crystal Charity Ball Educational Scholarship Project.

For more than 70 photos of the evening, check MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

 

Junior Leaguers Grand Slammed Milestones Luncheon With Awardees Caren Prothro, Linda McFarland And Venus Williams

The Junior Leaguers had pulled out all the guns for The Milestones Luncheon on Wednesday, November 16, at the Hilton Anatole. JLD President Bonner Allen and Luncheon Co-Chairs Amanda Shufeldt and Pat Prestidge had their over-the-top game plan in order, so they wisely booked the Chantilly Ballroom to accommodate the expected 1,500 guests.

Linda McFarland and Caren Prothro

And that game plan was built around some pretty heavy hitters — Linda McFarland would be presented as the Sustainer of the Year and Caren Prothro would receive the Lifetime Achievement Award, which has only been previously presented to Ruth Altshuler, Lindalyn Adams, Linda Pitts Custard and Lyda Hill. Needless to say, honoring these ladies alone could have sold out the luncheon ASAP.  

But then Bonner, Amanda and Pat wanted to complement the awardees with an equally prestigious speaker — tennis legend Venus Williams.

Still the event’s schedule was tight. Venus had to be out of there by 1 p.m. At first blush, it looked a little iffy. The VIP reception for the meet-and-greet started at 10:30 with organizers swearing Venus was “going to be here any minute” because she needed to leave by 11:15. By 10:41, the lineup for photos with the featured speaker was starting to extend beyond the cordoned-off area, but there was no Venus. A woman in white at a side entrance door was stationed to watch for her arrival. Just as the clock hit 10:54, Venus arrived. And it was so worth the wait.

While guests filled out forms, others handed off their purses and stood next to the towering 6’1″-tall tennis player, who was totally charming. She especially like Annika Cail’s necklace. But as every photo was taken, the lineup grew three-fold. Nevertheless, Venus’ posture and smile never wavered and she stayed past the 11:15 deadline.

Linda Secrest and Isabell Novakov

In the meantime, most of the men folk gathered at the other end of the room for coffee. Junior League Ball Chair Isabell Novakov reported that she was right on target for her March 4th fundraiser that will also take place in the Anatole’s Chantilly Ballroom. The 55th anniversary gala will “showcase past Balls and bring back elements of our history as we celebrate the JLD’s 95th Anniversary.” Her goal is a whopping $1M.

But back to the day’s fundraiser. Finally, the event could wait no longer and the Wedgwood Room doors to the ballroom opened at 11:18 with guests being encouraged to head to their tables. Still Venus stayed for the final photo that was taken at 11:25 and then headed to the ballroom.

Ten minutes later, Mr. Big Voice was heard advising guests to sit with the infamous “the program will start momentarily.” Only instead of a five-minute warning, it truly was momentarily with the house lights dimming seconds later.

Pat Prestidge and Amanda Shufeldt

Emcee Shelly Slater arrived at the podium, did a selfie and told guests to start eating. After Rev. Stephen Swan provided the invocation, Shelly was back with some “housekeeping tips.” No, not the Heloise type that involved grout cleaning, but how the purchase of the centerpieces would also help get through the valet line faster.

Bonner Allen and Kittye Peeler

At 11:39 Amanda and Pat thanked all for supporting the event and were followed by Bonner and JLD Sustainer President Kittye Peeler, who presented Linda and Caren with their awards.

Just past noon, guests got to their meals. Wise move. That way the clatter of utensils hitting plates would be done when Venus had a chat with WFAA sportscaster Joe Trahan starting at 12:36.

Taking their places in easy chairs on stage, the two talked as if they were in a living room. Sounding at times like a starry-eyed groupie, Joe asked Venus about her relationship with her sister, Serena Williams. While Joe wanted to get into discussing tennis, Venus took a timeout to say “Hi to everyone” and told how much she had enjoyed meeting guests earlier in the day. Looking out into the audience, she added, “You guys looked absolutely fantastic. I want to go shopping with all of you. We’ll do at a later date. Next time it will be Junior League-Neiman Marcus.” Grand slam!

Venus Williams and Joe Trahan

Highlights of the conversation included:

  • Her winning her very first Wimbledon, six to three — “I did?…Okay. My first championship was born out of tragedy a bit.” She explained that back in 1999 when she and Serena were playing the U.S. Open, they were in the semi-finals, so they had the chance to meet in the finals. “I didn’t actually win my match, but I learned so much from that. It made me so hungry.” Off for a number of months due to injuries, she played at Wimbledon, “When I went there, I thought ‘This is my time. I’m the one.’ So, I went to that tournament knowing I was going to win. I’ve got to say that I haven’t gone to another tournament with that same attitude, but it was just like you want to win your first one,  you want to cross over that line and it was just knowing that I was not going to walk away without that title that year.”  
  • What she does when she gets to that match point — “I just press the gas pedal. I love being at match point and at that point I just knew it was mine. It’s a privilege to be at match point. I try to live my whole life at that match point level.”
  • Venus Williams

    Winning the first title compared to subsequent ones — “It always changes. It’s never the same. I wish there was a special equation of ‘Now you do it this way. Here’s your formula. And there you go.’ But it’s not. Sometimes you’re torn; sometimes you’re off; sometimes you’re injured; you’re playing a different opponent; it might be windy; sometimes you’re confident; sometimes you’re not. But it’s never the same formula. I think the next year I played, I ended up playing someone who was an upstart and got to the final. And then, of course, you don’t want to go there saying one of the best players in the world loses to someone you never heard of. It’s a whole different kind of pressure.”

  • Venus’ op ed piece on equal pay for men and women — “I never thought that I was going to be a part of equal rights. It wasn’t something that I was aware of as a young person that women weren’t paid the same as men. I grew up dreaming of winning Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and didn’t realize that it wasn’t equal until I got there. So, once I got there and I had an opportunity to be part of it, it was like you have to take a stance for something. Sometimes you find yourself in a situation. There was no grand plan, but it’s been wonderful for me because I’ve been able to follow the footsteps of people like Arthur Ashe and Billie Jean King and that’s meant so much to me to be able to contribute more.”
  • Lessons that apply both to sports and business — “In sports, there is no win-win. There’s just win. But you figure out how to win. And it applies to teamwork. Of course, within your own organization, it’s about teamwork. It’s about collaboration and it’s also about setting goals and working toward them…That’s why sports is so amazing for young women because it gives them confidence. It gives them goals; it gives them focus. You feel good about yourself and about your body especially in a day when body image is so challenging. Instead of thinking about what you look like, you think about what your body is doing for you. It’s switching the focus…. But you also learn about losing. As much as you want to, you can’t always win. And loss is the biggest single teacher every single time. Even if you don’t want it to be.”
  • Venus Williams

    Her sister Serena — “I would never pass up an opportunity to play with Serena Williams in doubles. You can’t make that work. We love each other’s company.  We always buoy each other up. It’s awesome to play with someone that you feel confident in. Then you can do your job and you don’t have to feel like you have to carry them. You can relax a little bit more. And if you’re playing bad, you know they can carry you and vice versa. It’s an awesome partnership. We wish we could play every tournament because we love that dynamic, but that’s not possible. She’s really fun. I’ll have to bring her next time.”

  • Sisterhood — “A lot of cultures have their own thing about community. In West Africa, they have like a symbol where everyone is pushing everyone up a tree.  So, we’re always pushing each other up. And that part of pushing is also competing, but it doesn’t mean we have to be rivals. We can respect each other as competitors. Just as women, we have to always be supportive of each other because not only are we facing not an equal playing field, we can’t also fight each other. We also have to have that ‘good girls club.’ We have to all be good girls and get on board and support each other. If someone phones asking if you can be here, you don’t need to know why, you just say, ‘I’m there.’ I love to win. It’s fun. I also love to see other people win, other people be successful. I love to see women be powerful. There is nothing more amazing than seeing a powerful woman. It’s intimidating actually to see someone so amazing, so beautiful, so gracious just kicking butt.”
  • Failure — “It’s an important, unfortunately but fortunately, motif in my career. Failure has always motivated me and taught me a lesson. When you fall back down, you’ve got to get right back up again. Don’t be afraid to fail. Failure is part of your success. If you’re not failing, that means you’re doing too safe or you’re such an expert and amazing that you’re just not human…. The biggest failure to me is not learning from a loss.”
  • Motivation — “The biggest motivation in my tennis career has been my sister outside of mom and dad. I wouldn’t have picked up a racket if it hadn’t been for them. But Serena taught me how to be tenacious and strong. She was just naturally so competitive and so courageous and fearless. And I was, ‘Okay, I’ve got a talent, but I hadn’t grown that heart yet.’ Remember how the Grinch had that little tiny heart? And at the end the heart got big and he became this amazing person. Well, that’s kind of what happened to me in sports. I didn’t push myself enough. You have to throw your whole body even if you’re faced with a firing squad. It doesn’t matter if you go down  on a stretcher, you won the match and die on the spot. But if that’s what it takes, that what it takes.  So, I kind of had to learn that and she showed me that. I’m eternally grateful to her because I would have been a great player who never crossed the line.”
  • Venus Williams and Joe Trahan

    Motivation in business — “My dad always encouraged us to be entrepreneurs. He encouraged us to work for ourselves. He encouraged us to get our education. He said, ‘I’m not raising some athletes here.’ Sometimes we took advantage of that by saying, ‘Dad, we have a lot of homework today.’ He’d say, ‘Okay, then we’ll cut the court short today.’ We didn’t do that too often, or he would have caught on.  He was a Renaissance man. Growing up, we’d be going to tennis tournaments and he’d be playing a tape about foreclosures. We didn’t understand it, but it was a mentality. When you’re eight years old, if you understand a foreclosure you’re probably not doing it again. It just set us up to be confident and to think for ourselves, which is super-important for a female athlete, especially a female tennis player because you’re going pro so young and there are all these outside forces that can stumble you and you can become a statistic really fast. There are also a lot of parents who stumble their own children by not allowing them to make their own decisions and grow up to be independent and strong. Our parents were a keen influence on all of that.”

  • Being in the National Museum of African American History and Culture — “I didn’t know I was in there…. That’s cool. I hope they don’t remove it.” She learned about it when friends sent her a picture of the exhibition.
  • Women in the future — She applauded what has been accomplished by women, and feels that in the future it’s important to have men come on board. “Unfortunately in this world, there is always something to conquer, but fortunately there are groups like the Junior League that are in it to win, and I appreciate your having me here today.”
  • Adversity in her life that she’s grateful for — “Wow! That’s deep. Any challenge, I don’t question it. For me it’s about being able to live with how I deal with it and being able to deal with it on my own terms. And coming out with what I can do to win and being able to regulate it and live with it that way. That’s enough for me.”
  • Her proudest accomplishment — “Two things I would say: Being able to look with no regrets, and also looking back and saying I enjoyed it.”
  • Volunteering in Compton — This past November she and her family kicked off the Yetunde Price Resource Center in Compton, California, for families suffering from violence. Her older sister Yetunde Price was killed in 2003 in a drive-by shooting. The opening and support of the center allows Venus and her family to come full circle. “It was a super healing experience for my whole family to come back to Compton and to do that. We ended up going back to the court that we practiced on a lot. I got so emotional. It was so surreal. When we got there, all those things that happened. I loved that whole experience…Serena talked about the foolish things we did.”
  • Final words — “I love Dallas and thank you for allowing me to be a part of it [the luncheon]. I love the things that you’re doing on all levels. I look forward to the next chapter and coming back if you’ll have me.”

    Venus Williams and Joe Trahan

Finishing up just before 1 p.m., Joe proved to be a typical dad and Venus fan asking for a selfie with Venus for his daughters. Without hesitation Venus flashed that constant smile and accommodated Joe.

MySweetWishList: The Senior Source

According to The Senior Source‘s President and CEO Cortney M. Nicolato, CPHIT,

Cortney Nicolato*

“This year, The Senior Source has assisted, protected and connected nearly 35,000 older adults in North Texas. With 10,000 Americans turning 65 each day in the US, our wish is to work together to raise awareness about aging issues and give all older adults here in Dallas to tools they need to not just survive, but Thrive. To do this, we must first draw attention to the struggles seniors in our community, and across the nation, are facing.

 “More than 20,000 older adults in the city of Dallas alone live below the poverty line and nearly that same amount live barely above that line. More and more older adults seek to live independently, but many do not have the means or resources to do so. Additionally, we are seeing an influx of elder abuse – emotional, physical and financial. Just last year alone, older adults lost $36 billion dollars to financial exploitation, frauds and scams.

“The Senior Source works to give seniors access to a better quality of life. A great example of this is one of our amazing clients, Ms. Julie. Ms. Julie suffered a stroke in her 50s, which required her to leave her job and therefore she lost her income. She lives in her childhood home, in West Dallas, which was in dire need of repair.  The ceilings had caved in, instances of mold were a daily sight, bursting pipes in the winter were a given, and fences were so broken that stray dogs would roam into her yard regularly. No one should live like this, but unfortunately many older adults in our community do.

“Her pastor recommended she call The Senior Source, and we immediately jumped into action. We helped Ms. Julie with her budget and finances, and we worked with the city to get her home rebuilt through the city’s Neighborhood Improvement Program. This is one of the thousands of stories that illustrates how The Senior Source has helped some of the most vulnerable in our community.  To see Ms. Julie’s full story, see our YouTube video.

“As 2016 comes to a close, and we reflect on our many blessings, we hope you will consider a gift to The Senior Source to allow us to help lift even more older adults out of poverty, to work to end elder abuse and neglect, and to ensure that everyone has access to critical services. Also, help us raise awareness by referring an older adult in need to us, introducing someone to our Agency and consider giving of your time to volunteer.  Check out the variety of ways you can give back at www.theseniorsource.org or call 214.823.5700.  With your support, we can make 2017 brighter for a generation who has given so much to us.”

-By Cortney M. Nicolato, CPHIT, The Senior Source’s president and CEO

Smokey John Reaves Delivers A Powerful Message At Reconciliation Outreach’s Legacy Of Hope Luncheon

For a second day in a row, one of the Park Cities main arteries was blocked on the verge of creating a traffic heart attack. While the itty, bitty Callier Cares Former Chairs Luncheon had had guests parking on the curb due to the golf tournament, that was nothing.

On Thursday, October 13, a flood of Reconciliation Outreach guests created a mind-blowing back-up on Mockingbird. Whether it was turning right or left onto the club property, it had vehicles backed up.

Some guests just gave up the challenge of making it to the porte-cochere’s valet and just found one of the limited parking spots and huffed it to the club house. Here’s a report from the field:

The Annual Legacy of Hope Luncheon benefiting Reconciliation Outreach was held on Thursday, October 13, at the Dallas Country Club to a sold out audience. Jan Pickens and Alison Farrow were Honorary Chairs with Nena Boyd and Faith Stazzoni serving as Luncheon Chairs.  The luncheon raised $135,400.

Nena Boyd and Faith Stazzoni

Nena Boyd and Faith Stazzoni

Guest Speaker Smokey John Reaves challenged each guest to “be available to do what needs to be done in your community.” To the amazement of the guests at the end of his presentation he asked those in the audience who would make a commitment to stand and publicly pledge to bring honor in their lives by agreeing to be “available to God and to your neighbor.” Everyone stood!

“I have heard many luncheon speakers and Smokey delivered one of the most authentic messages I have heard,” said Lisa Troutt as she left the DCC.

Dorothy Moore presented the Servant’s Heart Award to Eloise and Tom Chapman and the Junior Servant’s Heart Award to Keaton Kinard for their commitment of time and volunteer work at Reconciliation Outreach (RO).

Lifetime Achievement Awardee Nancy Beth Robert recalled, “Almost 30 years ago, Dorothy and I walked the drug infested neighborhood now the campus of Reconciliation Outreach and visualized how it could serve East Dallas and transform lives with your support true hope and change are occurring daily in our neighborhood.”

Founded by Dorothy Moore in 1986, RO stands as a beacon of hope to people in Dallas, providing residential and non-residential programs for people who have life-controlling problems such as abuse, homelessness, and addiction. RO also serves the children of East Dallas through its After School Program and Reconciliation Academy. RO’s mission is to establish and maintain a strong Christian community within the inner city, and to provide a safe and loving environment for healing lives and restoring families and individuals to a productive lifestyle. Funds raised from this event will support both RO’s youth and adult programs.

Offering leadership direction for the Legacy of Hope Luncheon were Luncheon Advisor Katherine Coker and the Advisory Committee consisting of Marilyn Augur, Nell Bush, Amy Simmons Crafton, Leah Fullinwider, Margaret Hancock, Sarah Perot, Carol Seay and Lisa Troutt.

Major donations were given by the following:

  • Legacy Platinum ($20,000) — Amazing Grace.Life
  • Legacy Gold ($15,000) — Faith and Ray Stazzoni
  • Legacy Silver ($10,000) — Marilyn Augur Foundation, Highland Park Presbyterian Church and Morning Star Family Foundation
  • Promise ($5,000) — Anne Compton, Lisa and Clay Cooley, Empower Dreams Inc. and Alison Farrow and Jan Pickens
  • Hope ($3,000) — Martha Lou and Dan Beaird, Nena and Ken Boyd, Eloise and Tom Chapman, Dorothy and Bob Moore and New Covenant Foundation
  • Outreach ($1,500) — Brad Gresham, Michael Held and Stacey McCord
  • Partners ($1,000) — Barbara Croft, Maureen Lupton and Judy and Keith Martin

Countdown Time For 2016 Cattle Baron’s Ball Is Underway

This evening while Dwight Yoakam is on stage in Midland and Toby Keith is singing at the BOK Center in Tulsa, there are 100 Cattle Baronesses who have been preparing for Saturday’s American Cancer Society fundraiser featuring both of these country western icons.

When the gals started out for Gilley’s this morning, all they knew was rainy skies outside and chilly temps inside the honky-tonk. Luckily, setting up the hundreds of silent auction items, doling out the goodies for the much-vaunted favor bags and arranging for final logistics warmed things up.

2016 Cattle baron's Ball committee

2016 Cattle Baron’s Ball committee

Even after lunch, when the entire committee gathered for a group photo, the thought was whether the wet stuff was going to hang around. It really, sincerely didn’t matter like the old days when the event was held in cow pastures and Southfork. Nowadays, the ladies have relocated the whole kit-and-caboodle to Gilley’s with its bigger-than-a-small-city tent for the main concert. However, drippy weather does take the bounce out of hair dos and who wants to splash their ostrich boots in puddles?

Luckily, the past CBB chairs brought good news with them for their group photo — the rain was gone. In its place was nothing but sunshine.

Past and 2016 Cattle Baron's chairs from the left: (seated) Cindy Turner, Amy Turner, Olivia Kearney, Cara French, Andrea Weber, Tanya Foster, Cindy Stager and Joan Eleazer; (standing) Cindy Lindsley, Vicki Chapman, Karol Bruton, Kristen Sanger, Tia Wynne, Mary Parker and Katherine Wynne

Past and 2016 Cattle Baron’s chairs from the left: (seated) Cindy Turner, Amy Turner, Olivia Kearney, Cara French, Andrea Weber, Tanya Foster, Cindy Stager and Joan Eleazer; (standing) Cindy Lindsley, Vicki Chapman, Karol Bruton, Kristen Sanger, Tia Wynne, Mary Parker and Katherine Wynne

But wait! There was even more good news. Saturday’s forecast is for more sun and warmer temperatures. So, there will be no need for umbrellas and long johns. Instead it will a strutting display of turquoise, leathers and Stetsons on some mighty fine looking fundraisers.

If you’ve got your ticket,

  • fast now and snarf down the vittles tomorrow night. It’ll crazy grazing time.
  • get in line for the Ferris wheel with its spectacular view of downtown Dallas and the Margaret bridges.
  • make sure you’ve got your “credentials” for entry and your favor bag ticket.
  • consider Ubering to and from.
  • start checking the silent auction items online now and pick out which ones you’re gonna take home.
  • get a great spot to bid on the live auction items. If your budget was blown on your wardrobe, then get a place to watch the highrollers roll up the bids.
  • budget some dough to buy raffle tickets. After all, you could probably use a new car or watch or …

Facing Dallas’ Dante Inferno, The Bridge Announces New Leadership To Help The Homeless And Support The Mayor’s Call For A United Effort

Say the word “homeless” and an array of feelings arise like guilt, apathy, helpless or not-my-problem. And those feelings have been in simmering for decades. For too long, well-intentioned people have driven over the highways oblivious that hundreds of people were living… no make that surviving… there in tents or makeshift shacks. After all, these taxpaying drivers had other concerns like paying bills, getting kids to school or making a meeting. Yeah, the homeless situation was unfortunate, but the thinking was if they wanted to get out, they could roll up their sleeves and get a job and work their way out of it. That’s what “normal” people would do.

But these aren’t your normal” people. They’re people who have fallen into a Dante’s Inferno of despair, drugs, isolation and fear.

For years the situation has only increased because, as one community leader said, “Nobody really cared about them.”

Mike Rawlings (File photo)

Mike Rawlings (File photo)

Yes, there have been loads of nonprofits that have struggled to help the North Texas homeless. But the situation got to an “out-of-the-closet” dilemma with the recent demolition of the area tent cities. The hope had been that the tent citizens would move from the streets and utilize the organizations and their programs. But that transition has not taken place. There are lots of reasons why — lack of funding, limited services, a lack of cohesiveness among the programs, etc.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings is all too aware of the homeless situation. Before becoming mayor, he was known as the Homeless Czar for his efforts to spearhead “The Bridge,” which opened in 2008. Over the weekend The Dallas Morning News reported that Mayor Mike is “calling for the creation of a cross-jurisdictional government agency — ‘like DART’ — that would focus solely on solving Dallas’ homeless crisis.”

Ironically, The Bridge was already ramping up its structure to meet this area-wide problem by announcing “new leadership positions on its board of directors.”

Community leader Lynn McBee, who has served as co-chair of the board, will assume the role as sole chair of The Bridge’s board of directors. She’ll continue in her capacity as CEO of Young Women’s Preparatory Network and as a member of the Dallas Commission on Homelessness.

Lynn McBee (File photo)

Lynn McBee (File photo)

According to Lynn, “I am honored to serve as chair of an organization that is leading the way in providing homeless recovery services to our community’s most impoverished citizens. The growing poverty in Dallas requires us to continue to be innovative in our approach to addressing this important part of our city’s health.”

Other changes will include Dorchester Minerals CEO Casey McManemin serving as the Administrative Committee’s chair; longtime supporter of The Bridge Jennifer Karol continuing as chair of the board’s Development Committee; and attorney Michael Peterson heading up the board’s Governance Committee.

Continuing on The Bridge’s executive staff will be President/CEO Jay Dunn, who has led The Bridge since its inception; COO Sam Merten, the former advisor to Mayor Mike before joining The Bridge staff two years ago; and Chief Development Officer Ashley Harris, who had previously been involved in the fundraising for Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity.

The Slipper Club Of Dallas Provides Both Volunteers And Funding For 2016-2017 Beneficiary Rays Of Light

There may be those who think the Slipper Club of Dallas gals are former debs who simply know how to party. Oh, so very wrong. Ages ago, membership was dominated by non-bowing types, who wanted to combine having fun and raising funds.

This past month the Slipper Club board volunteered with Rays Of Light at the Lovers Lane United Methodist Church, where they were “paired with a special needs child and became their mentor and friend for the night. From basketball to puppets to arts and crafts to computer games, it was an enriching experience for both the child and board member.”

Slipper Club Board volunteer night*

Slipper Club Board volunteer night*

Rays Of Light provides free, quality respite care to families with children with special needs. The Slipper Club members are “striving to lend support and relief to these families through our respite care program called ‘Night Lights.’”

Thanks to their Olympic-themed event hosted at Barley House in August, the Club was able to provide close to $3,000 for Rays of Light.

But this is only the beginning of their campaign to assist Rays Of Light. In addition to Night Lights, they’re hoping to top last year’s total of $53,000 that went to I Have A Dream Foundation at their Slipper Club Gala on Saturday, February 4, at the Omni Dallas Hotel.

* Photo provided by The Slipper Club Of Dallas

North Texas Giving Day Booster: Volunteer McKinney

Dana Riley*

Dana Riley*

Volunteer McKinney is unique in that the ‘clients’ we serve are 120 local nonprofits who are located in and around Collin County. We host nonprofit and volunteer management trainings, networking events and large scale volunteer events all in an effort to build the capacity of local nonprofits and increase the efficiency of volunteers who serve them.  It is sometimes hard for people to understand what we do and I often say ‘We are the Match.com for people seeking ways to volunteer.’ Utilizing technology, volunteers can connect with one of our agencies with just a click and can also learn about events and even find out what in-kind needs the agencies have.

Volunteer McKinney*

Volunteer McKinney*

“Although our role in North Texas Giving Day is as an agency who is seeking donations, we are also the host agency for the Collin County Donation Station. This puts us right in the middle of a lot of exciting happenings and we are grateful for the opportunity to bring this event to Collin County. There is nothing like being a part of the event and seeing the agencies arrive. Volunteers are on hand to help them and we all celebrate each other during the event times. We will greet people, talk about our agencies and hopefully get a few extra dollars in our accounts so that we can continue the work that we do!  We hope that people will get in their car and drive to McKinney and see what all the fuss is about!

Volunteer McKinney*

Volunteer McKinney*

Coordinating this local event is easy for us. We do this kind of work all the time, but Giving Day is the one day that we get to join together for the good of all.  We love what we do and want to encourage you to get to know us better by visiting www.volunteermckinney.org.”

-By Dana Riley, Volunteer McKinney Executive Director

 * Graphic and photo provided by Volunteer McKinney

______

In seven years, North Texas Giving Day has pumped more than $119 million into the North Texas community. In 2015, $33 million was raised through more than 118,000 gifts benefiting over 2,000 nonprofits.

On Thursday, September 22, support Volunteer McKinney by linking here and spreading the word. #NTxGivingDay

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: 2016 Junior Cattle Baron’s Ball

From the left: Dawn Greiner, Julie Clancy, Kathryn Henry, Jennifer Walters, Andrea Weber, Danielle Sealy, Lisa Ogle, Brynn Bagot and Mary C. Corrigan

From the left: Dawn Greiner, Julie Clancy, Kathryn Henry, Jennifer Walters, Andrea Weber, Danielle Sealy, Lisa Ogle, Brynn Bagot and Mary C. Corrigan

While many were in faraway places or sleeping in on Sunday, August 7, Cattle Baronesses Mary C. Corrigan and Lisa Ogle were hustling down at AT&T Arena for the annual Junior Cattle Baron’s Ball.

Nainga Thomas

Nainga Thomas

Nainga Thomas

Nainga Thomas

Hudson Whiteman

Hudson Whiteman

Hudson Whiteman

Hudson Whiteman

Cassidy Barrett

Cassidy Barrett

Cassidy Barrett

Cassidy Barrett

The event celebrates munchkins and their families, who are battling childhood cancer. And what were the two most popular items at the party? Well, you’ll just have to wait for the post. But until then, check out the incredibly, absolutely adorable kiddos at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

From the left: Christopher Merrell III, LaTonia Merrell, Chasity Merrell, Christin Merrell and Christopher Merrell II

From the left: Christopher Merrell III, LaTonia Merrell, Chasity Merrell, Christin Merrell and Christopher Merrell II

If you need an incentive to support cancer research via the Cattle Baron’s Ball at Gilley’s on Saturday, October 15, you’ll see it in the eyes of the wee warriors.

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Junior League Of Dallas Milestones Luncheon

According to Junior League of Dallas Milestones Luncheon Co-Chairs Pat Prestidge and Amanda Shufeldt,

Amanda Shufeldt and Amy Prestidge (File photo)

Amanda Shufeldt and Pat Prestidge (File photo)

“The Junior League of Dallas would like to extend an invitation to join us for the annual Milestones Luncheon on Wednesday, November 16, at the Hilton Anatole Hotel. As the annual fundraiser benefiting the Junior League of Dallas Community Service Fund, the Milestones Luncheon serves as a platform to raise awareness for the programs supported by the JLD, as well as to celebrate and honor members who are making a difference in the Dallas community.

Venus Williams*

Venus Williams*

“This year, we are excited to have Olympic gold medalist Venus Williams as the keynote speaker. As the first African-American to reach world number one in the Open era, Venus has defied the odds to become a tennis champion with more than 20 career titles to her name.

“The JLD is proud to have many outstanding Sustaining members who continue to share their JLD leadership skills and training, while making a difference in the community. They represent the very best qualities of League members and show selfless dedication. This year, our Active members will honor Linda McFarland as Sustainer of the Year for her commitment and dedication to the Dallas community. As a League member, Mrs. McFarland has held numerous leadership positions including president of the Junior League Sustainers, and she has leveraged her JLD training to benefit organizations like The Dallas Woman’s Club, The Salvation Army DFW Metroplex Command, Communities Foundation of Texas and Child Care Group.

Linda McFarland (File photo)

Linda McFarland (File photo)

Caren Prothro (File photo)

Caren Prothro (File photo)

“The JLD will also present Caren Prothro with the 95th Anniversary Lifetime Achievement Award for exemplifying our mission. In addition to being a supporter of the arts and higher education, Mrs. Prothro was instrumental in establishing the Letot Center and co-chairing the campaign to construct the Letot Girl’s Residential Treatment Center, a first-of-its-kind long-term counseling and residential center supporting victims of trafficking and abuse.

“The Milestones Luncheon will take place Wednesday, November 16, in the Chantilly Ballroom at the Hilton Anatole Hotel. Check-in will begin at 11:00 a.m. and the luncheon will start at 11:30 a.m. Individual Luncheon tickets are $175, and Patron Luncheon tickets are $350. Sponsorships begin at $3,000. To purchase tables or individual tickets, please contact the JLD Development Office at 214.357.8822, ext. 118 or visit www.jld.net/luncheon for more information.

“Proceeds from the Luncheon, along with other annual fundraising and underwriting efforts, allow the JLD to grant $1 million to the Dallas community each year. We hope you will mark your calendar and make plans to join us during our 95th anniversary year!”

* Photo provided by the Junior League of Dallas

Junior League Of Dallas Reveals Big Plans For Anniversary Year With Awards Luncheon Featuring Venus Williams And “Encore” Gala

The very idea of a coat, tie and suit on Tuesday, June 21, was like wearing mittens to thread a needle. But a handful of gentlemen like Dan Novakov, Brent Christopher and David Shuford mustered up their inner strength for the announcement of the Junior League of Dallas’ upcoming fundraising plans for its 95th anniversary.

But don’t be too teary-eyed for the men. After all, the event was taking place inside Joyce and Larry Lacerte’s mansion. And to keep things cool, the house general Roxann Vyazmensky scurried to the entry hall to close the front doors that were wide open. After all, the secret to summer party success is keeping things literally cool.

Roxann Vyazmensky, Lena Baca and Joyce Lacerte

Roxann Vyazmensky, Lena Baca and Joyce Lacerte

The plan for the evening called for the party to start at 5:30 and the “remarks” at 6 p.m. By 5:40, the streets were already lined with vehicles. Sure, some of ‘em belonged to folks at the Highland Park pool, but more than 170 were there to hear the JLD reveal.

Bonner Allen

Bonner Allen

Promptly at 6 on the dot, like a lead cheerleader 2016-2017 JLD President Bonner Allen welcomed the group including Nancy Halbreich, Lynn McBee, Aimee Baillargeon Griffiths with her old Vanderbilt roomie Dr. Regina McFarland (aka JLD-er Linda McFarland‘s daughter-in-law), Sarah Losinger with her son John Losinger and his wife Laura Losinger, Linda GibbonsMarian Bryan, Connie O’Neill, Gerald Turner, Louise Griffeth, Christie Carter, Nancy Gopez, Linda Secrest and Dee Collins Torbert.

Laura and John Losinger and Sarah Losinger

Laura and John Losinger and Sarah Losinger

Dee Collins Torbert

Dee Collins Torbert

Susan Nowlin

Susan Nowlin

Aimee Bailllargeon Griffiths and Regina McFarland

Aimee Baillargeon Griffiths and Regina McFarland

But let’s not dawdle with the niceties. It’s the news of the night that had the Lacertes’ great room greatly filled with two cloaked easels positioned in front of the fireplace.

Amanda Shufeldt and Amy Prestidge

Amanda Shufeldt and Pat Prestidge

First on the agenda were 2016 Milestones Luncheon Co-Chairs Pat Prestidge and Amanda Shufeldt, who revealed the event will be held at the Hilton Anatole on Wednesday, November 16. Then they announced three biggy surprises. First was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award. It’s a highly prized acknowledgment among the JLD sisterhood, since it’s given only once every five years to a JLD Sustainer. Previous recipients had been Ruth Altshuler, Lindalyn Adams, Linda Custard and Lyda Hill. The 2016 honoree will be Caren Prothro. Next up was the announcement of which of the JLD Sustainers would be recognized for her work. It was no surprise that Linda McFarland will be the honoree.

Ruth Altshuler, Caren Prothro and Nancy Halbreich

Ruth Altshuler, Caren Prothro and Nancy Halbreich

Linda McFarland

Linda McFarland

Then the final luncheon surprise was who the speaker would be. In the past, it had been folks like Jan Langbein, Vernice Armour, Laura Bush and Jenna Bush Hager. Pulling the cloth off one of the easels, Pat and Amanda announced the keynote speaker would be tennis powerhouse Venus Williams. The news was greeted with cheers and applause.

KarenShuford

KarenShuford

Next up was Isabell Novakov, who is chairing the 55th Annual Junior League of Dallas Ball on Saturday, March 4, in the Anatole’s Chantilly Ballroom. First out of Isabell’s bag of surprises was that Karen Shuford, who has chaired practically everything (JLD Ball, Cattle Baron’s Ball, Crystal Charity Ball, The Senior Source’s Spirit of Generations Luncheon and Dallas Museum of Art’s Art Ball when it was known as the Beaux Art Ball) except the Byron Nelson, will serve as honorary chair.

As for the theme, Isabell removed the drop cloth from the second easel and there was the theme —“Encore.”

Isabell is using the event to “celebrate and pay tribute to our dedicated ball chairs who are now serving as Sustaining Advisors. We plan to showcase past balls and bring back elements of our history once more for the ‘Encore’ presentation.”

Janet Quisenberry, Sandy Ammons, Paula Davis, Isabell Novakov, Lydia Novakov, Linda Secrest and Connie ONeill

Janet Quisenberry, Sandy Ammons, Paula Davis, Isabell Novakov, Lydia Novakov, Linda Secrest and Connie ONeill

Watching proudly from the sidelines was Isabell’s mom, Lydia Novakov. It was a bit like old home week for Lydia as she was joined by members of the executive committee (Janet Quisenberry, Sandy Ammons, Paula Davis, Linda Secrest and Connie O’Neill) who served with her when she was JLD president.

Tickets for the black-tie ball are available, as are tickets to the Milestones luncheon.

For more photos of the reception, check out MySwetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Junior League Of Dallas Anniversary Announcement Reception

Bonner Allen

Bonner Allen

It’s gonna be a very big year for the Junior Leaguers of Dallas. They’re not only celebrating their 95th year of providing volunteers and funds for the Dallas community, but their annual Gala is going to hit the 55-year mark. No wonder JLD President Bonner Allen was all smiles. All the plans for the biggy year were revealed on Tuesday, June 21, at Joyce and Larry Lacerte‘s home.

Lydia Novakov, Roxann Vyazmensky, Lena Baca, Joyce Lacerte and Isabell Novakov

Lydia Novakov, Roxann Vyazmensky, Lena Baca, Joyce Lacerte and Isabell Novakov

In the crowd were loads of JLD-ers, friends and family members like Joyce’s mom Lena Baca and sister Roxann Vyazmensky, Linda McFarland and her daughter-in-law Regina McFarland and Isabell Novakov and her mom Lydia Novakov.

As the write-up is being finished, check out the MySweetCharity Photo Gallery for a gander of some of the folks.

JUST IN: Dallas Historical Society’s Awards For Excellence Recipients Announced

What a great way to start off the week. The Dallas Historical Society just sent word of the  2016 Awards for Excellence in Community Service recipients. Yipee! They hit it out of the park again with a terrific roll call of peeps that if you didn’t know, you should. The honorees will be:

Molly Bogen (File photo)

Molly Bogen (File photo)

Linda Perryman Evans (File photo)

Linda Perryman Evans (File photo)

Keith Cerny (File photo)

Keith Cerny (File photo)

Hugh Aynesworth File photo)

Hugh Aynesworth File photo)

  • Arts Leadership (This award is given to that individual who has enriched the cultural life of Dallas as planner, organizer, fundraiser, collector or art historian.) – Keith Cerny
  • Business (This award is given to that individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the business climate of the community.) – Leonard M. Riggs Jr. M.D.
  • Creative Arts (This award is given to that individual whose prominence as a practitioner of the fine arts as artisan, architect, writer, composer, producer or performer has enriched the cultural environment of Dallas.) – Eliseo Garcia
  • Education (This award is given to that individual who has made an exceptional contribution to the field of education as a teacher, administrator or benefactor.) – Pat Mattingly
  • History (This award is given to that individual who has researched and chronicled aspects of the history of Dallas and Texas as a historian, journalist, researcher, folklorist or author.) – Hugh Aynesworth
  • Humanities (This award is given to that individual whose active sense of civic duty has provided leadership in achieving specific community goals.) – Molly Bogen
  • Medical Research (This award is given to that individual who has made an outstanding contribution through prominence or public service in medicine, scientific research, the behavioral sciences or public health.) – Dr. Eric Olson
  • Philanthropy (This award is given to that individual whose vision and personal generosity has greatly benefited this city.) – Linda Perryman Evans
  • Sports Leadership (This award is given to that individual who has brought distinction or achievement to team or individual sports as an athlete, coach, journalist, promoter or sports advocate.) – Michael Johnson
  • Volunteer Community Leadership (This award is given to that individual whose generous gift of self has enriched the community.) – Philip C. Henderson
  • Volunteer Community Leadership (This award is given to that individual whose generous gift of self has enriched the community.) – Frederick “Shad” Rowe
  • Jubilee History Maker (Created in 1991 and given in recognition of “Jubilee Dallas!,” this award recognizes an individual whose achievements extend to more than one of the award categories.) – Margot Perot
Mary Suhm (File photo)

Mary Suhm (File photo)

Veletta Lill (File photo)

Veletta Lill (File photo)

Bob and Gail Thomas (File photo)

Bob and Gail Thomas (File photo)

2016 Awards For Excellence in Community Service Luncheon Co-Chairs Mary Suhm and Veltta Lill are joined by former Awards recipients Gail and Bob Thomas as 2016 honorary co-chairs for the Thursday, November 17, luncheon at the Fairmont Dallas.

According to Dallas Historical Society Chairman of the Board of Directors William C. Helmbrecht III, “The Dallas History Society is honored to recognize this class of notable award recipients. Their service to the community in their varied fields has contributed greatly to the history of the city.”

If you don’t know one of these folks, here’s your opportunity to meet, greet and get to know ‘em.

JUST IN: Yes, Everyone’s Best Friend Nancy Gopez Had A Heart Attack And She’d Love To Hear From You After Her Nap

So what do you do when your best friend has a heart attack? That question has been making the rounds on Facebook since Friday evening when Nancy Gopez, who was visiting her folks in Virginia, sensed symptoms that had her checking in at the local ER. The symptoms-awareness was courtesy of Mary Humphreys Gill Parker, who had been a firsthand vet of the disease, and shared it with friends and strangers. Luckily, Nancy had listened, heeded the words and acted appropriately.

Nancy Gopez

Nancy Gopez (File photo)

According to Mary, who has been in communication with Nancy, the result was surgery implanting three stints and lots of sleep.

So, who is this Nancy Gopez? If you ask a lot of folks in the volunteer area of North Texas (Cattle Baron’s Ball, Suits for Shelter, Dallas Historical Society and Turtle Creek Recovery Center to name a smidgen), the answer is a chorus of “She’s my best friend.”

Actually, that may well be true, because she’s earned her stripes from being a tireless volunteer who brings along a lot of energy and attitude with little need for acknowledgement. In fact, Nancy is the one with the camera, who is taking the best shots at most events.

Despite her itty-bitty stature, she defines North Texas charitable support and has been known to show up as the sun is rising to stuff bags for the cancer-surviving kids attending the Junior Cattle Baron’s Ball at American Airlines Center.

There has been a flurry of messages on Facebook and other communications about Nancy and her situation. One missive claimed she was going to be back at work Wednesday!

Checking in with Mary, here is the straight poop. Nancy is really focused on mending with loads of sleep at her folks’ home after being released from the hospital. In other words, chill on the texting and the phone calls for the time being. This situation is a hard one for her BFFs to handle. All they know is a non-stop Nancy.

The plan right now calls for Nancy to return to North Texas next week… a time to be determined by her recovery. In the meantime, get-well cards can be sent to her folks’ address (13821 Brandy Oaks Place, Chesterfield, VA 23832). So, get those cards stamped and in the mail. How great it would be for Nancy to wake up from a snooze to notes from you.

And if you don’t know Nancy, you’ve missed out on a bright star. Luckily, because of Mary’s warnings and Nancy’s heedings, you still have a chance to get to know a nonprofit Energizer Bunny Rabbit with a “refurbished” heart of gold.

2016 Parade Of Playhouses Brings Out The Competitive Spirit To Raise Funds For Dallas CASA At NorthPark

Jeff Kindig

Jeff Kindig

Jeff Kindig of Harman is bound and determined to continue Harmon’s reign as the Parade of Playhouses top builder. It was just last year when Jeff blew the Dallas CASA parade competition at NorthPark off the grid with Buckaroo Mountain Adventure house. But Friday as the 14 adorable mini-mansions were preparing for the official kick-off, the bearded Jeff found himself facing the idea of staying put in his African Safari Adventure until the “parade’s” finish on Sunday, July 31.

The reason goes back to the night before, when the 14 Parade of Playhouses were delivered to NorthPark lining from Dillards to Macys to North Court. Since the houses were to be prepared for display Friday morning, the mini-houses were literally open houses Thursday night with munchkins checking out the rock walls, slides, ladders and multi-levels.

Retro Roots

Retro Roots

Steampunk

Steampunk

Friday morning was spent cleaning up footprints and replacing doorway netting and other temporary stop measures with Plexiglas. It was the installation of the Plexiglas that found Jeff on the wrong side of the tent. But after a little work, Jeff was outside and the goodies (bunk beds, desk, chair, trunk, Harman stereo audio system and an ATV-Style Jeep, 12-vol 4X4 Electric Car) were safely behind the Plexiglas for viewing.

Looking at the Plexiglas successfully in place, Dallas CASA Executive Director/President Kathleen LaValle with camera in hand admitted that the competition had been fierce. The Crest Casa Garage had an adorable mini-Cadillac parked inside. One builder, whose entry had a metal roof, reported that his people would be out each morning to polish the roof. The “Life on Mars” was the product of the College of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma.

Crest Casa Garage

Crest Casa Garage

Kid Cottage

Kid Cottage

Life on Mars

Life on Mars

XyLophoNEhouse

XyLophoNEhouse

In the meantime, NorthParkers were chuckling about inquiries about NorthPark’s new piece of art. It wasn’t. It was XyLophoNEhouse, a work in development. On Saturday the wooden tunnel would be highlighted by musical tubes all tuned to the note of C…like CASA.

Love and Peace

Love and Peace

Steampunk

Steampunk

2016 Parade of Playhouses

2016 Parade of Playhouses

The adorable homes with amazing detailing and imagination will be on display for voting and raffle until Sunday, July 31. The timing is simply perfect with the heat and humidity getting really old. Strolling through air-conditioned NorthPark to check out the parade is free for the viewing. And if one or two or all of them strike your fancy, buy a raffle ticket! You can either do it at one of the tables set up in NorthPark or do it online. The chances are going for $5 for one or five for $20. The winning tickets will be drawn on Sunday, July 31 at 4 p.m. at NorthPark.

You can also vote for your fav by texting dallascasa to 41444. Each vote costs $5. After all, paper ballots are so yesterday.

The Lookout*

The Lookout*

However, there was one MIA. Starting yesterday, #15 (aka The Lookout) was in place at Dallas CASA.

Why not drive over to Dallas CASA in the Wilson Historic District and check it out? While there check out volunteering for Dallas CASA.

In meantime, you can check out all the NorthPark 14 plus The Lookout at Dallas CASA at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

* Photo provided by Dallas CASA

MySweetCharity Opportunity Series Returns

MySweetCharity

MySweetCharity

The worker bees have been busy bees, while the queen bees have been in far-off places. They’re been arranging for invitations, checking menus with caterers and sending “Save The Date” notices to just about everybody.

It’s all in preparation for the last dash for 2016 fundraising. And to help get the word out about the creative and marvelous opportunities for North Texans to support, the MySweetCharity Opportunity series will kick off tomorrow and will continue through Wednesday, August 31.

And just in case you thought you knew every 501(c) 3 on this side of the hemisphere, be prepared. There are gonna be some pretty remarkable organizations that have been fundraising under even your radar. If one or two or 10 strike your fancy, you know how to get involved —a checkbook and/or a sign-up for volunteering.

If you’re a 501(c) 3 and have such an “opportunity” in the next few months, have a volunteer submit a pitch. If you need some examples, here’s one and another one and another one. But you’d better hurry. Time’s a-wasting.

Slipper Club To Benefit Rays Of Light With Funds And Volunteering

Leave it to the Slipper Club ladies to multi-task in supporting nonprofits. For ages they were largely a social club, but they added a new twist. Instead of just having social occasions, they decided to turn them into fundraising opportunities. Thus, their annual gala benefits a different nonprofit each year.

But then in this age when hands-on involvement is as valuable as funds, the Slipper membership has added volunteerism to their agenda of giving back.

This year they picked Rays of Light as their 2016-2017 beneficiary for the gala at the Omni Dallas Hotel on Saturday, February 4.

In addition to raising the funds, Slipper members “will also partake in volunteer opportunities” for the “local foundation dedicated to being the light at the end of the tunnel for both children with special need and their families in the Dallas metropolitan area.”

If Rays of Light is new on your radar, Slipperette Lily Kramlich-Taylor explains that, “Together with dedicated volunteers, Rays of Light creates a unique evening for special need children and their siblings on the first three Friday of every month at the Lovers Lane United Methodist church and Christ Foundry United Methodist Mission for Spanish-speaking families. This give the parents the opportunity to have four free hours, while the children get socialization and interaction with peers and volunteers through educational and fun activities.”

While tickets aren’t online, those wonderful sponsorship opportunities are, by contacting Amy Stone!

Fashion Stars For A Cause Is Looking For The 2017 Crop Of Fashion-Loving Fundraisers

“Nominations” for the 2017 Fashion Stars For A Cause (FSFAC) are now open. Well, it’s really not so much nominating, as much as it’s volunteering. Fashion Stars Founder Yvonne Crum is sending out notes to potential “stars” and friends saying,

“If you are interested in being considered for Fashion Stars for a Cause 2017..to benefit Suicide and Crisis Center of North Texas (SCCNT) and feel you could fulfill all the requirements, check out the nomination form and return it with a good photo of you…It’s a very rewarding year of events and you will be helping us with awareness that Depression is a disease and helping get them help.”

Fashion Stars For A Cause*

Fashion Stars For A Cause*

That’s a pretty smart way for getting folks on board, because the “stars” are expected to be more involved than just wearing pretty clothes.

According to the form, candidates are required “to support the Suicide and Crisis Center of North Texas event fashion stars for a Cause with helping raise funds for the Center’s Programs and agree to the following in their support of SCCNT.

  1. “Representing the organization at events that are agreed on as mandatory Kick-off, Patron Party, Wrap Party. All dates will be given to you as soon as they are known (FSFAC Gala March 24, 2107)
  2. “Selling Raffle tickets — will be given tips on how to sell them to be more effective (minimum 50)
  3. “Selling sponsorships and/or tables (minimum of 1 table/sponsorship) You buy a table or sell one.
  4. “Making the public award of the mission of SCCNT: To help those in crisis, especially suicidal crisis, to find hope for the future.
  5. “Attend one of 4 mini-lunch/visits to the Center to see exactly what SCCNT does. (Very inspiring)”

The deadline for the forms to be submitted is Monday, August 15. Then a panel will “meet in September and selections will be made.”

Funds raised from FSFAC will benefit the SCCNT’s Survivors of Suicide and Teens Can Survive programs.

* Graphic provided by Fashion Stars For A Cause

VNA To Launch “Society 34” At Top Knot For Young Professionals

Summer may be officially firing up, but fundraising news hasn’t chilled one bit. Instead of events taking place hourly, news is pouring in nonstop.

The VNA is the latest to report an undertaking. It’s the launch of a “young professionals group to carry on Dallas’ strong tradition of community service caring for seniors.”

The new group will be officially called Society ’34. Interesting name, but what does it mean? Well, membership will be open to anyone between the ages of 24 and 44 and 34 is smack, dab in the middle of that range. Now you know!

The organization will provide an opportunity for members “to learn, serve and enjoy leadership and networking opportunities” that include volunteering and social activities. There will also be  benefits like

  • Invitations to educational and networking events
  • Participation in volunteer activities
  • Discounts to special VNA events

To build its membership, a kick-off event will be held at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 28, at Top Knot, where “charter memberships will be offered at a discounted rate of only $34.”

According to VNA President/CEO Katherine Krause, the plan calls for “Society ’34 to engage today’s young professionals who will be the leaders and caregivers of tomorrow.”