Texas Scottish Rite Hospital For Children’s Amputee Ski Trippers Geared Up At St. Bernard’s With Tony Herring Smiling And Ruthie Chilling On The Floor

For the usual Sunday Breadwinners brunch crowd in Inwood Village, the parking lot on Sunday, January 21, seemed a little more crowded than usual. The reason was that St. Bernard’s across the way had opened earlier than its usual Sunday noontime start.

The reason was the gathering of Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children’s patients who would be on the slopes of Winter Park at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in February for the 36th annual Amputee Ski Trip. They were at the ski-friendly store to get fitted for gear.

Crutches

Ruthie

The scene inside the store was like a pre-Christmas holiday party. Crutches were quickly stowed so kids could settle on the floor to cuddle with Ruthie, the laid-back St. Bernard mascot.

Across the way, a white-haired fella with a camera was capturing the activity. He could have easily been mistaken for one of the 14 youngsters’ grandfather. But actually he was TSRHC Chief of Staff Emeritus Dr. Tony Herring, the father of the annual ski trek. It was 37 years ago that Tony had started the TSRHC Amputee Ski Trip after hearing about a Denver program for youngsters with orthopedic challenges to head to the mountains for skiing and snowboarding.

Tony Herring

Over the years, Tony had sent off dozens and dozens of kids who had faced the loss of limbs to do more than just learn the art of skiing and snowboarding in Colorado. It was also an opportunity for the youngsters to be with others who have gone through surgeries, therapies and the emotional adjustment to being a bionic. To Tony’s delight the kids have returned with a sense of great self-esteem.

Cody McCasland and Tony Herring

But being ever the professional, he couldn’t help but check out the newest gear for the amputee patients like rock star Cody McCasland, who was born without shinbones due to Sacral Agenesis resulting in the amputation of both legs at the knee. He got his first set of prosthetic legs at 17 months and, over the years, he’s proved to be an extraordinary athlete, as well as scoring appearances on “Oprah” and “Ellen.”

Ryanne Carr

In fitting the kids with their gear, one staffer asked second-timer Ryanne Carr what size sock she would like. She smiled and said she didn’t need them. The staffer looked a little baffled. Then she pointed out that her prosthetic legs weren’t in need of socks. It seems that the 14-year-old had lost both of her legs and part of her right arm due to being born with amniotic band syndrome. A St. Bernard staffer quickly responded asking if she had a sister or brother. The answer was “Yes!” The sibling got a nifty pair of socks. Like Cody, Ryanne has earned quite a reputation in overcoming her physical challenges. The former Junior Race Director for the Dallas White Rock Marathon admitted seven years ago that, “I like to swim; I like to bike; I like to climb trees; I like to build Legos; I like to ride horses.” Now, she’s added snowboarding to that list.

This year’s junket takes place on Monday, February 12, with TSRHC pediatric orthopedic surgeon Dr. Henry Ellis on board, as well as TSRHC Director of Prosthetics/double amputee Don Cummings and other staffers to advise on the type of equipment that would be needed. As Tony pointed out, the trip also provides an opportunity for the staff to better understand the challenges that their patients encounter outside the hospital.

The trip is free for the kids, thanks to the Stephen M. Seay Foundation, American Airlines and St. Bernard.

Children’s Medical Center Foundation Benefactors And Friends Are Shown Appreciation For Providing $44M In 2017

Christopher Durovich

Brent Christopher

While the Saints and the Vikings were battling for the NFL Division title in Minneapolis on the evening of Sunday, January 14, Children’s Health President/CEO Christopher Durovich and Children’s Medical Center Foundation’s Brent Christopher, John Mitchener and Bill Braem were thanking benefactors and friends at the Dallas Country Club for their support.

John Mitchener

Bill Braem

The fact that many had the next day off, thanks to Martin Luther King Jr. Day, allowed the 200 or so guests like Children’s First Lady Christina Durovich, Barbara and John Stuart, Carol Seay, Monica Egert Smith and Susan and Dave Scullins to leisurely enjoy the buffet in the grand ballroom.

Christina Durovich and Carol Seay

John and Barbara Stuart

As the Vikings battled en route to pulling off a last-second win, Foundation President Brent was looking very pleased for another reason. Having just completed his first full year in his position, he reported that $44M had been tallied, the third-highest amount in the Foundation’s history. That sweet number was only surpassed by a whopping $71M in 2015 and $55M in 2012.

JUST IN: After-School All-Stars North Texas Hits A Home Run With 2017 World Series MVP Jose Altuve For Third Annual Rising Stars Luncheon

While this spring’s nonprofit events seemed to be ladies-only when it comes to celebrity draws (Kristin Chenoweth, Katie Holmes, Chrissy Metz, Hilary Swank, etc.), it’s not the case. The After-School All-Stars North TexasThird Annual Rising Stars Luncheon that was such a hit last year with Dak Prescott has scored another super-duper athlete — Jose Altuve!

Jose Altuve*

Please, oh, please, don’t let anyone know that you haven’t heard of him. That’s like saying you haven’t heard of Dak!

Just this past year Houston Astros second baseman Jose was named both the 2017 World Series Champion MVP, AP Male Athlete of the Year, the Hank Aaron Award and Sports Illustrated’s Sportsperson of the Year.  

The shortest active player in the Major League Baseball standing at 5’6”, his journey to greatest almost didn’t happen. In 2007 when he was just 16, he tried out for the Houston Astros in his hometown of Maracay, the scouts initially decided to take a pass on his participation. Why? He was too short and lied about his age. But thanks to his father’s encouragement, he returned the next day with his birth certificate in hand. Eventually, he got his chance to show his stuff and it was so impressive, they signed him up as an undrafted free agent.

As for the rest of the story, Jose will share it at the ASAS luncheon on Wednesday, March 28, at Northwood Country Club.

Chairing the event will be a trio of father-son teams — David Bland with son Adam Bland, Brad Reeves with son Cole Reeves and Logan Stout with twin sons Miles Stout and Cooper Stout.

According to ASAS Board Chair Ben Lange, “We are incredibly excited to hear Jose Altuve’s personal story about how he overcame obstacles to achieve success today. We know this luncheon will help ASAS North Texas reach even more students with a safe place to go after school.”

This lunch will be a biggie. Like last year, don’t be surprised if parents get their kids out of school to attend, listen and be inspired by both Jose and the ASAS program.

Working with middle school students in Dallas, “they have grown to serve more than 650 students this year with a safe place to go during the ‘danger zone’ hours of 3-6 p.m. Every day, ASAS studenst receive a healthy snack, targeted tutoring or homework time, and enrichment clubs like robotics, basketball, fashion design, lacrosse and cooking.”

Don’t strike out and get your sponsorships/tickets now!

* Photo provided by After-School All-Stars

MySweet2018Goals: Louise Griffeth

According to Texas State History Museum Foundation Trustee Louise Griffeth,

Louise Griffeth (File photo)

Ray and Nancy Ann Hunt (File photo)

“My goal for the new year is to increase awareness and support of the Texas Independence Day Dinner that will honor three Dallas residents-philanthropist Nancy Ann Hunt, her husband, business icon Ray Hunt and legendary golfer Lee Trevino at the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin on Tuesday, February 27, with the prestigious History-Making Texan Award.

Lee Trevino (File photo)

Dan and Stacey Branch (File photo)

“Dallasites Stacey and Dan Branch, who is a Trustee of the Texas State History Museum Foundation, are serving as co-chairmen for the event. Proceeds from the event will benefit many education programs and special projects of the Museum. Jan Felts Bullock of Austin is honorary chairman.

“Each year, the museum connects more than 100,000 school children from around Texas to the state’s vital history and culture, encouraging critical thinking and actively engaging them in applying knowledge to contemporary issues.”

MySweet2018Goals: Whitney Strauss

Whitney Strauss (File photo)

According to new AdvoCare Foundation Executive Director Whitney Strauss, MySweet2018Goals are

  1. “Make hundreds, thousands…millions more children healthier by combatting the causes of childhood obesity in Dallas but throughout the US.
  2. “Make my own household healthier by paying attention to food labels, exercising regularly, cooking at home and cutting out sugar
  3. “Take up a dance class because no better way to stay fit then doing something you love
  4. “Travel, read and pursuit a passion
  5. “Hug my boys and read up on how to handle a teenager – because I will have one in my house this year!”

MySweet2018Goals: Brent Christopher

According to Children’s Medical Center Foundation President Brent Christopher,

Brent Christopher (File photo)

“The second busiest pediatric emergency department in the whole U.S. is right here at Children’s Health. And, on the Dallas campus, it’s time for an overhaul.  So, one of my top professional goals in 2018 is to help more people across North Texas know about the four-year plan getting underway to create a double-decker emergency department at Children’s Medical Center Dallas. There will be lots of ways that everyone can be part of ensuring that this state-of-the-art resource is available for their kids and grandkids when they need it most for many years to come.

“Personally, I aim to be pedaling my bike more often, exploring all of the fantastic new trails that continue to connect Dallas—often across land I’ve never seen before, but right in the heart of the city. 

“Hopefully, these two goals won’t intersect, though, because I’d rather not do anything that involves having to make my own trip to the ER!”  

MySweetWishList: Camp Summit

According to Camp Summit CEO Carla Weiland,

Camp Summit*

“My wish this holiday season is that every child and adult with disabilities has the opportunity to experience the joy of camp.

“Campers like Alex, whose parents struggle every month to cover the costs of required medications, doctors’ visits, and ongoing therapies, cannot give their son the camping experience. Many families with children with special needs require help with the cost of accessible recreational activities for their children. They also rarely have the opportunity for respite from the daily tasks of caregiving. Often, they are so overwhelmed with their day-to-day survival that the fun and fulfilling activities other families can enjoy every day seem unreachable.

Camp Summit*

“Over 90% of Camp Summit campers and families receive financial assistance from Camp Summit in order to attend camp. Help us continue our tradition of accepting all campers, regardless of their ability to pay, their age, or the severity of their disability, by donating in support of our 2018 “campership” campaign.

“Your donation helps ensure that our remarkable campers, like Alex and his friends, will never be turned away due to financial hardship, allowing them to experience the freedom of the outdoors, make s’mores around the campfire with new friends, and enjoy a week of adventure with no barriers.

“Support our campers by donating here, or visit www.campsummittx.org to learn more about our barrier-free camp programs. Thank you for making a camper’s dream come true this holiday season. Happy holidays from Camp Summit and our remarkable campers!”

-By Carla Weiland, Camp Summit president and CEO

* Graphic and photo proved by Camp Summit

A Gentle Reminder: 2017 BMW Dallas Marathon Weekend Will Have Runners On Area Roads Both Saturday And Sunday

BMW Dallas Marathon*

Back in 1971 the very first Dallas White Rock Marathon was held on March 6. Over the years the name and date changed. In 2012 “White Rock” disappeared from the name and it became Dallas Marathon. Over the years some things stayed the same like Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children being the beneficiary and thousands of participants including world-class runners.

2017 Coors Light 5K and 10K*

This weekend the annual runathon has been expanded. For starters, it’s going to be a two-day run including

If you’re not planning on being part of those running or volunteering, you might want to check the road closures that will be in place. They range from Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge through downtown Dallas on Saturday to Sunday mega-run starting at City Hall and heading around White Rock via Turtle Creek and back to City Hall.

* Graphics courtesy of BMW Dallas Marathon

Dallas Historical Society’s Awards For Excellence In Community Services Recipients Displayed Insight And Graciousness In Accepting Their Honors

While the Dallas Historical Society‘s 2017 Awards for Excellence in Community Services crowds gathered outside the Fairmont’s International Ballroom, the VIPs and 2017 Awardees attended a private reception in the Venetian Room on Thursday, November 9. For some it was a great opportunity for people whose paths had never crossed to meet up.

Lindalyn Adams, Mary McDermott Cook and David Brown

Diane Bumpas and Bill Helmbrecht

Caro Stalcup

Joan Walne, Mary Suhm and Laurie Evans

For instance, historical preservationist Lindalyn Adams was almost giddy meeting former Police Chief David Brown. Speaking of David, he reported that due to his ABC contract, he was splitting his time between Dallas and New York City… Across the way, Laurie Evans was doing the swivel head looking for her husband Dr. Phil Evans to arrive. She knew he would be there, but when? … Already on the scene were past Award recipients Marnie and Kern Wildenthal, who were there to celebrate Kern’s brother Hobson Wildenthal’s being recognized for his work in education…. Patricia Meadows reported that the family home in the State Thomas neighborhood was on the market… and others like Joan and Alan Walne, Mary McDermott Cook, Louise Caldwell, Diane Bumpas, Caro Stalcup, Mary Suhm, Creative Arts Awardee Carolyn Brown, Arts Leadership Awardees Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller and Sports Leadership Awardee Tony Dorsett with his wife Janet Dorsett.

Louise Caldwell

Marnie and Kern Wildenthal and Mary McDermott Cook

Janet and Tony Dorsett

Phil Evans

 

Just moments before the chimes called the group to the luncheon, Laurie was relieved to see her husband arrive with a big smile. Seems he had gotten an early Christmas gift — a million-dollar grant —from an “anonymous” donor. That’s a pretty darn good excuse for a delayed arrival.

The ballroom was filled to the max, as people like Jill Bernstein, Sandi Chapman, Kimber Hartmann, Gail Thomas and Lee Cullum took their seats. At 11:50 a.m., Master of Ceremonies Stewart Thomas called the group to order. Following an invocation by St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church Rev. Chris Girata, Stewart introduced Luncheon Co-Chairs Carol Montgomery and Kaysie Montgomery, who welcomed the group. They were followed by Dallas Historical Society Chair Bill Helmbrecht, who officially thanked all for attending and supporting the society.

Kaysie Montgomery and Carol Montgomery

All of this was done within six minutes! Promptly at high noon, Stewart reported that the program would continue in a few minutes and guests should settle back for lunch. Missing in action was table host Bobby Lyle, who was under the weather, but his table was filled with Adam McGill, Stan Levenson and Robert Prejean… Arriving just after luncheon was underway was Shirley Miller.

Adam McGill, Stan Levenson and Robert Prejean

At 12:25 p.m. Stewart was back at the podium and invited the award recipients to take their places in chairs on the stage.

Some of the highlights from the acceptance speeches were:

Carolyn Brown and Hobson Wildenthal

  • Hobson Wildenthal for Education — The University of Texas at Dallas Executive VP recalled how 50 years ago TI was created and the UTD resulted. 157 National Merit Scholars were in this year’s freshman class and it was designated as the Best U.S. College less than 50 years old. He finished saying, “Margaret McDermott is the queen of Dallas.”
  • Steve Pounders for Health/Science — The internist told how in 1981 he was just starting his care and discovered a disease that was affecting young men that would late become known as AIDs. It would become his life’s calling resulting in his serving as the primary physician for men in the Dallas Buyers Club. He thanked Veletta Lill, Resource Center’s Cece Cox and his spouse James O’Reilly.
  • Willis Winters for History — The Dallas Park and Recreation Department Director gave thanks for the recent passage of the bond: “One of the first projects will be the restoration of the Hall of State.”
  • Jorge Baldor for Philanthropy — The Cuban-born businessman acknowledged that 800,000 have been the recipients of DACA and encouraged audience members to support the Dream Act. He went on to thank the event and kitchen staffs and finished by reporting that several hundred students are living under bridges and still going to school.

Then the most poignant moment came unexpectedly. It was when former Dallas Cowboy Tony Dorsett accepted his award for sports. He admitted that he was a little taken aback by the people, and went on to recognize the late Cowboys Coach Tom Landry, who made Tony understand that things were going to be tougher in the NFL. Landry held Tony back and it taught the young football player patience.  Tony went on, saying, “I was always told that I was too small, time and time again.” Through effort and determination, he was able to play in the NFL for 13 years.  

Looking at the other recipients seated on stage, he went on to saying “These are fantastic and incredible people up here.”

He thanked his wife Janet saying, “What I’m going through is tough, and she puts up with me. It can be really difficult and she understands that that’s not the real me. This is tough.”

Having gone beyond his two-minute limit, Janet was seen quietly approaching the side of the stage. Tony heard her say, “Tony,” and he took note and sat down.

Moments later David Brown took his place at the podium to accept the Jubilee History Maker Award. He could have easily sucked the air out of the room for his leadership for the July 7 tragedy. Instead, David rallied the audience to give Tony another round of appreciation. The applause was deafening for both Tony and David’s act of graciousness.

David went to tell how his father hadn’t wanted him to be “a cop.” But on the day when he was made a lieutenant at the Hall of State, he had what would be the last conversation with his father, who said “You were right in your choice.”

Then David went further back in his history, telling how in fourth grade, he had played Captain George Ludwig von Trapp in the “Sound of Music.” The students had to do more than learn their roles. They had to research the backstory of the musical. Today he had become nostalgic when seeing the white flowers on the tables and hearing the musician play “Edelweiss” — the last song Richard Rodgers wrote with Oscar Hammerstein.

Tying it all together, he said, “Remember who we are, what we stand for, how we should treat each other.” Then he voiced disappointment at the lack of participation in the recent election.

At 1:14 p.m., Bill Helmbrecht returned to the stage and invited all to take part in the annual A.C. Greene Toast.

For more pictures of the day, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

A Passing: Al Hill Jr.

The tapestry of Al Hill Jr.’s life was one of many threads, colors and textures.  

Al Hill Jr. (File photo)

For many young people, Al was the behind-the-scenes patriarch of Highland Park Village and a very generous and supportive philanthropist. As one person told a new nonprofit development director on how to raise funds, “Go visit Al. He’ll take the meeting and listen. If he likes what he hears, he’ll answer your prayers.”

He was easy to spot at any event. It was his wheelchair that had become a double-edged sword since his fall in 2003 that resulted in his being paralyzed from the waist down. But even that couldn’t dampen his spirits. There was always the smile, especially when he was at events with his daughters Elisa Summers and Heather Washburne.

Old-timers remember Al of the late ’60s and early ’70s, when he was just in his 20s. He and his uncle Lamar Hunt spearheaded the growth of tennis, thanks to the World Championship of Tennis. It made sense, since Al had been an ace tennis player at St. Mark’s School of Texas and Trinity University. Tennis was on the launch pad to become a major sports contender like football and baseball. And the timing couldn’t have been better for Al, Lamar and Dallas.

Those were heady days, with Dallas’ new airport making it an international player in the world of travel and such membership nightclubs as Oz on LBJ and elan at Greenville and Lovers Lane for partying it up. To do it up big, Al and Lamar brought in such names as Arthur Ashe, Rod Laver, John Newcombe, Jimmy Connors, John McEnroe and Bjorn Bjorg, who could barely speak English.

But the venture into building the world of tennis wasn’t Al’s only undertaking. Being the grandson of the late H.L. and Lyda Hunt and son of the late Margaret and Al Hill Sr., he was involved in the oil business. Being the nephew of the late race-horse-loving Bunker Hunt, he developed a hands-on interest in horse racing. Being the nephew of Pumpkin Air owner Caroline Rose Hunt, he took on the charter-jet business as well.

And on the home front, he and his beautiful blonde wife, Vicki, were new parents of son Al Hill III and daughters Heather and Elisa.

But it hadn’t all been wonderful for Al. There was the divorce from Vicki, the life-changing fall from his porch in 2003, and legal issues following the death of his mother in 2007. Yet, those developments didn’t slow him down. He ended up adjusting his interests to focus on the building and restoring of Park Cities homes, as well as being a part of the purchase and redevelopment of Highland Park Village starting in 2009.

But it was in philanthropy where he shone, by putting even more of his family’s money and influence into the world of such nonprofits as Baylor Health Care System Foundation, Equest, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of North Texas, Center for BrainHealth, Salvation Army of DFW Metroplex Command, Big Thought, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, The Family Place, Communities in Schools of Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The Senior Source, Dallas Historical Society, and many others.

Saturday night, Al’s confinement to the wheelchair ended with his death at the age of 72. One can’t but suspect that he was the first one on the tennis courts the next morning in his after-life.

Our condolences to his family, friends and the countless others who have benefited from his generosity and friendship.

A Gentle Reminder: Over The Years Thanksgiving Day’s Has Been The Occasion To Show Gratitude And “Heal The Wounds Of The Nation”

According to tradition, Thanksgiving was a coming together of two people of different backgrounds, cultures and beliefs in 1621. So the story goes that on this occasion, the Plymouth colonists only survived their first year in the new world thanks to the Native Americans teaching them how to grow food and weather the harsh conditions. To celebrate and show their gratitude, the Pilgrims feasted with the Wampanoag tribe on the autumn harvest for three days.

Over the years similar occasions would be held in the young country as it grew in territory and population. It wasn’t until 1827 that the author of “Mary Had a Little Lamb” Sarah Joseph Hale undertook a 36-year campaign to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday.

Finally in 1863 when the country was suffering through the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln officially designated the final Thursday in November to be Thanksgiving Day. His hope was to “commend to his (God’s) tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners and sufferers in the lamentable civil strife” and to “heal the wounds of the nation.”

However, that date changed during the Depression when President Franklin Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week to encourage additional shopping.

Dinner table (File photo)

Today, Thanksgiving has turned into a day of feasting, parades and football with families and friends. But its roots still hold true — to show gratitude regardless of differences and “heal the wounds of the nation.”

Animal-Loving Karen And Jeff Banister Step Up To The Plate As Honorary Co-Chairs For Operation Kindness’ 25th Annual Canines, Cats And Cabernet

Alexandra Banister, Jacob Banister and Jeff and Karen Banister*

Texas Rangers General Manager Jeff Banister is a familiar name in the sports pages and on the evening news. But what some might not know is that he and his wife Karen Banister have two kids, Alexandra and Jacob, two Labradors (Bella and Scout) and two Maltese (Gracie and Cooper).  

Since the baseball season ended last month, the folks at Operation Kindness took advantage of the pooch-loving Banisters’ down time and arranged to have them serve as the honorary co-chairs for its 25th Annual Canines, Cats and Cabernet at the Omni Dallas on Saturday.

Nelda Cain Pickens (File photo)

According to Operation Kindness CEO Jim Hanophy, “Canines, Cats and Cabernet gets bigger and better every year, and we are honored to celebrate our 25th anniversary of this event with Jeff and Karen Banister. We know that with their support we will be able to knock this year’s event out of the park.”

But the Banisters aren’t the only ones cheerleading for the organization. Operation Kindness supporter Nelda Cain got involved with the no-kill shelter through her friend/OK Board Chair Kathy Kinser. As Nelda explained, “I have loved getting to know the powers that be at Operation Kindness and feel my efforts are entirely worth it. It is the oldest no-kill shelter in Dallas and serves the entire county including Fort Worth. It is also amazing what a following the organization has attracted, as the work is needed and successful.”

One of the highlights will be the furry guests of honor that have loved staying at Operation Kindness, but would love to find permanent homes.

Hoss*

Abby*

Cupcake*

Marlon*

In addition to a dinner and a live and a silent auction, there will be a raffle for a seven-night stay at an RCI Resort in the city of the winner’s choice plus a $500 Visa gift card for airfare. Chances are just $50, but are in limited supply.  

Tickets are the gala are available here.

* Photo courtesy of Operation Kindness

JUST IN: Candice Romo And Hollie Siglin To Co-Chair Children’s Cancer Fund’s “Celebrating 30 Sweet Years” Fashion Show

News just arrived about the Children’s Cancer Fund’s annual fundraiser gala. Hold on to your football helmets! In celebration of its 30th anniversary, the fashion show will have the theme “Celebrating 30 Sweet Years.”

Candice Romo*

Hollie Siglin*

And to make a really sweet deal, the co-chairs will be Candice Romo and her longtime buddy Hollie Siglin. In addition to both being moms, the gals are also partners in Hawk and Sloane.

To add some muscle to their team, they’ve drafted Roger Staubach and Troy Aikman as honorary co-chairs. Talk about star power!

Roger Staubach and Troy Aikman (File photo)

The ladies have already locked down the Hyatt Regency Dallas for Friday, April 27.

This anniversary already has all the signs of being a sweetheart of a fundraiser. Sponsorships are available now!

* Photos provided by Children's Cancer Fund

Go Ahead, Stay Toasty And Donate Without Guilt Saturday Morning

Mother Nature had been threatening for days to be part of the triple-doozy walks/runs benefiting breast cancer and diabetes throughout the area Saturday morning. Honestly, there are just times when you don’t want the old gal to be there. But sure enough, she announced that she was indeed showing up with her cold-shoulder temps. Yipes! Just as a preamble, she sent sleet to the northern parts of the territory on Friday afternoon. What a party pooper!

So, Saturday morning when you’re snuggled under that down-filled duvet and thinking about whether or not to have a triple-dollop of whipped cream on your hot chocolate, consider thousands of folks who are facing a very brisk morning to raise funds for the Susan G. Komen Race For The Cure Dallas County, National Cancer Society’s Making Strides of North Texas and Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s 2017 Healthy Harvest Fun Walk/5K Run and Expo.

If you just don’t have the strength to put on those adorable pink Valentino “Rock Stud sneakers” and scamper about the area, consider making a donation. It would warm the hearts of those facing the season’s first frosty chill.

Hint: If you were thinking about shopping at NorthPark, stall that dream off until afternoon when all the walker and runners are home soaking their tootsies.