Dallas CASA Has New Board Leadership And Members, As Well As Hosting Bronze Eagle Award Presentation To Texas Gov. Greg Abbott

Dallas CASA has been busy. This past Thursday afternoon at Dallas CASA, Gov. Greg Abbott was presented the Bronze Eagle Award for his work combating human trafficking at the North Texas Coalition Again Human Trafficking’s National Human Trafficking Awareness Event.

And then to add its news making, its board of directors has a new chairman and five new members. Taking over the reins of the board from Past Chair John Gibson is Exxon Mobil Corporation VP/Treasurer Robert “Bob” Schleckser. Having joined the CASA board and executive committee since 2010, he graduated from the University of Notre Dame, where he has served on the Notre Dame Engineering Advisory Council in addition to being on the Financial Executives International Committee on Corporate Treasury.

Bob Schleckser*

Terry Goods*

Hannah May*

Dallas CASA is also proud to welcome five new board members:

  • Terry Goods is the national director of diversity and inclusion for Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits. He’s also a member of the Diversity Advisory Board for Visit Dallas and the Plano Chamber’s Diversity Board.
  • Hannah May is the Dallas CASA Children’s Council representative on the board. An entrepreuneur with 20 years of experience, she’s been involved with Dallas CASA and the Children’s Council for many years.
  • Susan Rankin, a former family district court judge in Dallas, has practiced family law for 29 years, using her background in psychology to assist families and children as they navigate family issues in the courts.
  • Virginia Schaefer recently began a new position as a member of the Texas Instruments government relations team. Prior to that, she worked as senior vice president of public policy at the Dallas Regional Chamber.
  • Stephanie Stewart is vice president and chief information officer at Pioneer Natural Resources. She has more than 20 years of experience in information technology in the energy industry.

Susan Rankin*

Virginia Schaefer*

Stephanie Stewart*

In addition to Bob and John, they’ll be joining other board members including Chair-Elect Corey Anthony, VPs Ardo Fuentes, Cynt Marshall, Scott Orr, Janice Davis and David Young; and At-Large Members Mark Berg, Laura Losinger, Jim Lozier, Steve Penrose and Scooter Smith.

* Photo provided by Dallas CASA

Retired Texas Instruments Executive VP David Martin To Head Up Jubilee Park And Community Center’s Board Of Directors

With the newest year underway, the announcements of events and leaderships just keep streaming in. The latest is from Jubilee Park And Community Center.

David Martin*

Heading up the 2018 board of directors will be retired Texas Instruments executive VP David Martin. He will succeed outgoing President Jeff Rice.

According to Jubilee Park CEO Ben Leal, “David Martin is a long-time friend and advocate, not just for Jubilee Park, but for the families and neighbors whom our work represents.  His leadership and compassion have made a tremendous impact on our organization for years, and we are thrilled to have him at the helm. A true example of civic commitment, David and his family improve lives and strengthen community on every level at Jubilee.

“I want to extend my deepest gratitude to Jeff Rice for her service to Jubilee for two decades, especially during our twentieth anniversary last year. Jeff’s commitment to Jubilee is unparalleled.”

Joining David will be retired financial executive and entrepreneur Grady Schleier as VP/treasurer, Hallett And Perrin PC attorney Stewart Thomas as VP/secretary and SJL Design Group COO Kay Whelan as assistant treasurer.

New members of the board include Squeaky Connolly, Paul Polanco and Matt Waller, who will join current board members Bill Addy, Jorge Correa, Matt Davies, Tiffany Davis, Ken Gilbert, Rev. Chris Girata, Davis Hamlin, Tom Harbison, Elizabeth Hoffman, Gigi Poglitsch, Paul Polanco, Pat Prestidge, Jeff Rice and Will Snyder.

* Photo provided by Jubilee Park And Community Center

Family Gateway’s New Board Of Directors And Chairman Announced

Stephen Hipp*

Family Gateway has seven new folks joining its board of directors, as well as a new chairman of the board.

Serving in the leadership role for the organization will be Goldman Sachs Specialty Lending Group Managing Director Stephen Hipp.

Jennie Holmes Fahrenbruch*

Deanna Reyna Munoz*

Charlie O’Connell*

Exa Whiteman*

The newest members of the board include Justin Bailey, Jennie Holmes Fahrenbruch, Juanita Harris, Paula Miltenberger, Deanna Reyna Munoz, Charles O’Connell and Exa Whiteman.

According to Family Gateway CEO Ellen Magnis, “We are very excited about our new Board Chair and the addition of these seven individuals to our Board of Directors. Their skill sets will bring a variety of new ideas and insights to our agency and its mission to provide stability and life-changing supportive services to children and families affected by homelessness.”

They will be joining current directors Alex Sharma, Gary Moor, Gretchen Pollom, Leslie Benners, Ann M. Johnson, Jennifer Austin, Rick Deitch, Ariane Einecker, Shanjula Harris, Kirsten Kerrigan, Mirjam Kirk, Mika Manaster, Steve Martin, Doug Ness, Selwyn Rayzor, Bryon Romine and Paul Wilson.

For details on the new board members, just follow the jump:

* Photo provided by Family Gateway

[Read more…]

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Meeting

Nick Zenarosa, Norm Bagwell, Robin Robinson and Jim Hinton

Leonard Riggs and Clare Garca

In today’s world with all types of emergencies facing folks, from bad coughs to devastating accidents, the need for top-notch emergency rooms is vital to the North Texas community. On Tuesday, September 12, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board learned firsthand about the challenges, developments and the differences among the emergency facilities from Integrated Emergency Services Founder/CEO Dr. Nick Zenarosa at its quarterly meeting. The subject was “The First Three Hours: What Everyone Needs To Know About An Emergency Department.”

In addition to the new and old board members in attendance was Dr. Leonard Riggs, who was a pioneer in emergency room developments.

The occasion also marked Norm Bagwell’s debut as board chair and the addition of new board members.

While the post is being prepared, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery for the folks who lunched and learned.

BTW, Dr. Z revealed what day of the week is the busiest one for an ER. Think about it. The answer will be in the MSC post.

JUST IN: Attorney Guy Kerr To Head Up Salesmanship Club Of Dallas For The 50th Anniversary Of AT&T Byron Nelson

This is gonna be a big year for the Salesmanship Club of Dallas. They’re moving their mega-huge AT&T Byron Nelson to the brand new course at Trinity Forest Golf Club after years of being held at Las Colinas Four Seasons Resort. What a great way to celebrate the tournament’s 50th anniversary!

Heading up the 97-year-old non-profit service organization that “owns and operates Momentous Institute” will be newly named President Guy Kerr, whose day job is practicing corporate and securities law at Locke Lord LLP. A member of the Club since 1989, Guy has “held a wide variety of leadership positions for the Club, Momentous Institute and the AT&T Byron Nelson.”

According to Guy, ““The year ahead for the Salesmanship Club promises to be exciting, historic and immensely fulfilling as we transition the AT&T Byron Nelson to Trinity Forest Golf Club in Southern Dallas and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the tournament, while we continue to change the odds for thousands of kids and families through the work of our Momentous Institute.”

Guy Kerr*

Alan Walne (File photo)

Joining Guy during this transitional year will be the following new members of the Salesmanship Club Board of Directors: First VP Alan Walne, Second VP Joe Alcantar, Secretary Joseph Worsham, Treasurer Nelson DeVega, Momentous Institute Board Chair Jeff Barnes and Chair of the Salesmanship Club Charitable Golf of Dallas Board David Watson.

Start setting your GPS for Trinity Forest Golf Club for the tournament that starts Monday, May 14.

* Photo provided by Salesmanship Club of Dallas

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery: Ann Moody Place

For years, the Ann Moody Place was just a dream for those living in a nightmare. It was the hoped-for place of safety, where women could escape lives of domestic abuse and learn how to make a new and better life for themselves and their families.

Paige Flink Healing Garden in center courtyard

But thanks to The Family Place’s CEO Paige Flink, her staff, Legacy Campaign Chair Lynn McBee, TFP board and the North Texas community, Ann Moody Place became a 50,000-square-foot facility in the Medical District. Just before the Sunday, June 4th reception for supporters and the full-blown opening in July, a tour was conducted of the three-story complex with everything from an mini-clinic, kennels, a center courtyard, pillows embroidered with “Dream BIG” to artwork throughout.

Bird Flying free of a cage sculpture

While the post on the tour is being prepared, check out pictures at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery. Chances are you’ll never need Moody Place, but it needs your support to provide annually for the estimated 2,000 clients.

Dallas Women’s Foundation Board To Be Chaired By Caren Lock And Adds New Board Members

Ellenore Knight Baker is finishing up her two-year term as board chair of the Dallas Women’s Foundation. During her tenure, she led the Foundation in the creation of the Unlocking Leadership Campaign to raise $50M to “improve the future of North Texas by investing in the economic security and leadership potential of women and girls.”

Ellenore Baker (File photo)

Caren Lock and Roslyn Dawson Thompson (File photo)

In her place will be newly named Board Chair Caren Lock, who has “served on the Foundation’s executive committee, and she had chaired the Advocacy Committee. She is also a founding member of The Orchid Giving Circle at Dallas Women’s Foundation, a group of Asian women pooling resources to provide community grants that support social change and services for North Texas Asians.”

According to DWF President CEO Roslyn Dawson Thompson, “We so appreciate Ellenore’s leadership as board chair.  She is a dedicated advocate for our mission, and her passion and enthusiasm are contagious. We’re grateful that Caren brings her formidable talents and deep commitment to continue moving us forward toward our ambitious goals. Under Caren’s leadership, we will be working hard to complete the campaign, and ask everyone who supports our mission to consider giving a gift to help achieve our goals of ensuring equity for women and girls. We are also very pleased to welcome our new board members, who bring a wealth of talents and experience that will contribute greatly to this exciting time in our history.”

Those new board members include Bonner Allen, Bonnie Clinton, Teresa Giltner, Keri Kaiser, Laura Nieto, Carrie Freeman Parsons, Elizabeth Carlock Phillips, Priya Bhola Rathod, Diane Reeves, Zeenat Sidi, Karen Simon and Shawna Wilson.

George W. Bush Presidential Center Adds Harlan Crow, Henry Hager, Joel Kaplan, David Miller And Pam Patsley To Its Board

Since its opening in 2013, the George W. Bush Presidential Center has been a gathering place for all types. From international leaders comparing notes to being a favorite spot for nonprofits to centerpiece their presentations, it’s made its mark on the landscape.

To support such a world renowned operations requires a stellar group of board members. The following five new board members have just been announced by Bush Center Chairman of the Board Don Evans and Center President/CEO Ken Hersh: Harlan Crow, Henry Hager, Joel Kaplan, David Miller and Pam Patsley.

Harlan Crow (File photo)

David Miller (File photo)

According to Don, “As the Bush Center grows and expands its influence through domestic and international policy work and community engagement, I’m pleased that we’re also rounding out our Board of Directors to include this diverse and talented set of leaders. Their wisdom and guidance will be critical as the Bush Center continues its mission of developing leaders, advancing policy, and taking action to solve today’s most pressing challenges.”

Laura Bush (File photo)

Ray Hunt (File photo)

Caren Prothro (File photo)

Gerald Turner (File photo)

They’ll be joining the current board that includes Laura Bush, Bill Hickey, Ray Hunt, John W. Johnson, Mark Langdale, Jeanne L. Phillips, Caren Prothro, Craig R. Stapleton, Larry D. Thompson and Gerald Turner.

JUST IN: JPMorgan Chase Exec Michelle Thomas To Chair TACA Board Starting January 1, 2018

It’s just been announced that JPMorgan Chase VP of Corporate Responsibility and Community Relations Michelle Thomas will become TACA’s board chair. She will succeed current chair Donna Wilhelm on January 1, 2018, and will hold the position until December 31, 2019.

Michelle Thomas*

According to Donna, “We are thrilled that Michelle will chair the board of directors, and I know TACA will be in excellent hands with her at the helm. Michelle has a rare combination of leadership abilities, strategic insight and skills that will help elevate TACA and its mission of providing financial support and resources to the arts.”

Michelle is well-acquainted with both TACA and the importance of North Texas fundraising, having been “responsible for managing a multi-million dollar corporate giving budget for the Dallas-Fort Worth and Oklahoma regions. She is also responsible for implementing the firm’s strategic approach to philanthropy, which is multifaceted and aims to address community needs in the local market.”

Having served on TACA’s board, Michelle has chaired the TACA Silver Cup Luncheon.

Michelle commented, “I am honored to lead TACA, which has focused on transforming lives through the arts for 50 years. With TACA expanding its grants to include the visual arts, as well as creating a social impact fund, it’s an exciting time to work with the other board members to help lead the organization to even greater heights.”

Her volunteer efforts have included serving on the Advisory Board of the Center for Nonprofit Management, Junior League of Dallas and the Kipp DFW Council, Board of Directors for the Methodist Health Foundation and the UT Southwestern Medical Foundation. 

The Dallas native’s collection of accolades include 2014 Minority Business Leader in the Dallas Business Journal and being the recipient of the 2015 Business and Civic Leader award from the Dallas Black Dance Theater, the 2015 Income Award from United Way of Metropolitan Dallas and the 2017 Heritage Award from the African American Museum.  Under her leadership, JPMorgan Chase was named Outstanding Corporation of the Year by the Association of Fundraising Professionals in 2015.

* Photo credit: James Edward

JUST IN: TACA To Undertake Three Major Initiatives Including The Funding For Both The Performing … And Visual Arts!

Back when TACA started, North Texas’ art community was pretty limited. The arts were largely contained at Fair Park with the opera and musicals taking place in the Music Hall and the visual arts at the Dallas Museum of Arts facility near the lagoon. The Fair Park band shell with its nighttime performances and flying insects created memorable moments for singers. The Dallas Theater Center’s Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Kalita Humphreys Theater along Turtle was considered the new hottie in the world of art.  

But that was way back when. As TACA celebrates its 50th anniversary, changes are definitely underway for TACA’s next 50 years to support the overwhelming wealth of art groups in North Texas.

Donna Wilhelm (File photo)

This morning, TACA Chairman of the Board of Directors Donna Wilhelm sent a note to the stakeholders about three new initiatives for TACA.

Of the trio, the one that pops to the top of the list is “TACA Funding All Of The Arts In Dallas.” In the past, TACA has only provided funding for the performing arts. But in the future it will also support the visual arts. Before it kicks into place, the criteria for submitting grants requests will be developed and published toward the end of 2017. The deadline for the letters of intent will be Friday, February 1, 2018. The grants for both the visual and performing art groups will be presented in January 2019.

According to Donna, “For 50 years, TACA has funded the performing arts.  However our current Board of Directors has expansive vision—we will now add support of the visual arts. And we will foster arts experience that impacts social change in our North Texas community.”

The other two initiatives, are

  • “Social Impact Through The Arts” — TACA will establish “funds to foster the creation of new performing arts works and innovative performing arts residence programs” focusing on cultural and racial equity, cross-sector partnerships, arts education focusing on under-resourced communities, cross-cultural community collaboration and social change capacity building.
  • “Increased Vibrancy Of The Arts” — TACA will “lead a multi-year effort to empower and expand” the number of artists and arts organizations. The intention is two-fold:
    • To make the Dallas area a destination for performers, visual artists, musicians, writers, directors, backstage professionals, etc.
    • To create an environment that encourages the launch and nurturing of new arts organizations.

To achieve these goals, TACA will “develop a blueprint to learn and adapt strategies” that have been undertaken in other cities and “recreate the best of the best in Dallas, and enhance the impact through collaborative partnerships.”

Donna explained, “TACA is deeply committed to an expansive arts vibrancy in North Texas. We assure our donors, prospective donors and arts organizations that, for over half a century, we have established a grants review process that evaluates, selects and supports the very best organizations.  Every contributed dollar invested in TACA will indeed transform lives through the arts.”

New Baylor Scott And White Health President/CEO Jim Hinton Met Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Members At St. V-Day Luncheon

Just outside the dining room at the Charles Sammons Cancer Center, there was a long line of people waiting to meet a Very Important Person when the Baylor Health Care System Foundation board met on Tuesday, February 14. And, why not? The quarterly meeting, after all, marked one of the first public appearances ever by James (“Jim”) Hinton, who’d been tapped to succeed Joel Allison as the president and CEO of Baylor Scott and White Health.

Jim Hinton, Lindalyn Adams and Margo Goodwin*

And, like savvy showmen saving the big act for last, the foundation scheduled Hinton as the final speaker on the 90-minute luncheon program, whose theme was, “Radiologists: Master Interpreters in Diagnosing and Monitoring Disease.” With board members including Barry Andrews, Lisa Troutt, Ray Washburne, Pryor Blackwell, Ron Steinhart, Jill Smith, Richard Holt, Aileen Pratt, Michal Powell and Steve Leiberman in attendance, Board Chair Margo Goodwin kicked off the meeting by urging the members to “up” their giving, in order to reach 100% by the next quarterly get-together.

Michal Powell, Robin Robinson and Aileen Pratt*

Pryor Blackwell*

Jill Smith*

“We’re at 67% participation now,” she said. “We’ve been at 100 percent for each of the last four years, and I hope we won’t break that spell.” Margo also encouraged gifts to the American Cancer Society’s Hope Lodge, which selected Baylor University Medical Center as the site of its newest facility. Hope Lodge Dallas will offer free accommodations for cancer patients who have to travel long distances for their care.

Margo gave way at that point to Foundation President Rowland Robinson, who noted the recent deaths of three strong foundation supporters: former Zale Corp. Vice Chairman Leo Fields, former Baylor liver-transplant recipient Ginny Sellers, and Tommy Valenta, a former top executive with Chaparral Steel Co. and Texas Industries.

Greg dePrisco*

With that, Robin talked a little about the meeting’s focus on radiology—“the last link in the diagnostic chain,” he called it—before introducing featured speaker Gregory dePrisco, M.D., a diagnostic radiologist and director of the MRI Fellowship Program at Baylor University Medical Center. During his fascinating and sometimes-humorous presentation, Greg explained that a radiologist is a “doctor’s doctor,” and that 1.2% of all doctors are radiologists.

He recalled the specialty’s history, from the discovery of X-rays through the widespread use of CT scans and MRIs. He told about his membership on an “anal/rectal task force” and showed and explained a number of MRIs, including an MRI comparison between a 40-year-old woman who presented normally (the subject was actually his wife, Dr. Michelle Nichols, who was in the audience) and another woman with rectal pathology and a prolapsed uterus. 

Greg also recalled how he had personally suffered a stroke; was misdiagnosed at another local medical center, where the paramedics took him; and then recovered after receiving the correct diagnosis. (Greg had “something in my lung” that caused the stroke, he explained.) The radiologist ended his presentation by showing CT images of a colonoscopy, a mammogram, and a cancerous lung, before concluding with this observation: “Radiology is a strong link in the healthcare chain. I did go over my time a little bit, but the [story about my] stroke slowed me down!”

Jim Hinton*

Then it was time for Jim to end the program with some brief closing remarks. He took the reins at Baylor Scott And White Health in January, after serving for years as president and CEO of Presbyterian Healthcare Services in New Mexico, that state’s largest healthcare provider.

“It’s good to be in Texas,” Jim told the board members. “Typically in February I’m around a lot of Texans—but in the [ski] lift line at Taos. I wasn’t looking for a job when this one came around. But [Baylor’s] reputation and the opportunity to live in a community like Dallas were too much to pass up.”

The foundation’s fundraising efforts are crucial, Jim said finally, because “there’s not enough money in patient-care revenue” to support the Baylor healthcare system’s world-class work.

* Photo credit: Lara Bierner

JUST IN: Dallas Film Society Announces New Board Members And Reveals Returning/New Dallas International Film Festival Sponsors

Evidently, the Dallas Film Society isn’t taking time off for the holidays. Word just arrived that the film-loving organization has not only added a couple of new members to its board, but it’s also locked down some returning sponsors for its Dallas International Film Festival that kicks off on Thursday, March 30, at the Dallas City Performance Hall.

The new members of the board are advertising executive Eric Hirschhorn and University of Texas at Arlington adjunct professor Rebecca Flores.

Rebecca Flores*

Rebecca Flores*

Eric Hirschhorn*

Eric Hirschhorn*

According to DFS Chair Mark Denesuk, “As we head into the organization’s second decade, we continue to steadily add strength through new voices, new ideas, and new energy, from the arts, education, and business community. Drawing from both the film and education world, Rebecca continues to add emphasis to the two primary focuses of DFS, and Eric brings another valuable viewpoint from the world of advertising and marketing. Their talent, experience and vision, will help us greatly as we continue our efforts to grow in our second decade.”

They’ll be joining current board members Benton Bagot, Matt Bivona, Jason Cleveland, Paul Coggins, Clare Freeman, Suzanne Bock Grishman, Mary Hatcher, Geoff Hawkes, Harry Hunsicker, Lynn Lewis, Dallas Sonnier, Larry Waks and Maureen Womack.

As for the partnerships, The Arthur E. Benjamin Foundation will once again be the presenting sponsor “of both the legendary DFS Honors Awards Dinner and the DIFF 2017 Audience Awards.”

Joining the sponsorship list for a first time will be Mercury One Foundation that will be the new presenting sponsor for “DIFF’s annual High School Day and the year-round High School Roundtable program.”

The film submission software program Withoutabox is also a newbie on the sponsorship list joining other confirmed 2017 DIFF sponsors including Abco, Inc., Bloomberg Philanthropies, CineState, the City of Dallas – Office of Cultural Affairs, Commerce House, the Dallas Film Commission, Downtown Dallas Inc., El Creative, the Highland Dallas hotel, the Hong Kong Economic Trade Office – San Francisco, Lucky Post, the People’s Last Stand, PreKindle, Selig Polyscope, Stella Artois and the Texas Commission on the Arts.

Follow the jump for the full-blown press release.

* Photos provided by the Dallas Film Society

[Read more…]

Callier Center Kicks Off A Whole Tradition For Callier Care Chairs With Paloma Picasso Bracelets

While a major golf tournament created a crammed parking lot at the Dallas Country Club, making it look like a luxury used car lot on Wednesday, October 12, a gathering of champs was taking place inside the clubhouse.

The “gathering” was the Past Chairs Luncheon with former Callier Cares Luncheon Chairs Barbara Stuart (2013), Betsy Cullum and Sissy Cullum (2014), Tiffany Divis (2015) and Angie Kadesky (2016), 2017 Chair Emilynn Wilson, Callier Center Foundation Board President John Stuart and Callier Center for Communications Disorders Executive Director Dr. Tom Campbell and Callier staffers.

From the left: (standing) Sissy Cullum, Tiffany Divis, Emilynn Wilson and Angie Kadesky; (seated) Betsy Cullum, Tom Campbell, Barbara and John Stuart

From the left: (standing) Sissy Cullum, Tiffany Divis, Emilynn Wilson and Angie Kadesky; (seated) Betsy Cullum, Tom Campbell, Barbara and John Stuart

Tom recalled how it was back in 2011 that Pam Busbee, Tricia George, Tincy Miller and Sara Martineau decided it was time for Callier to have an event and that the first chair should be Libby Hunt. Since that first luncheon in 2012, the annual fundraiser has provided more than $725,000 “to help provide care for patients in need.”

As Tom put it, “This is all due to the leadership of each one of you around this table. There really are no words to adequately express our gratitude — not just for the dollars raised but also for helping to educate our community about the Callier Center.”

While lunch was being served, the former chairs discussed “things that worked well” for the fundraiser and possible suggestions on how to improve on it.

Just before the group finished, Tom reported, “We want to carry forward with the tradition of holding the past chairs luncheon each fall. It will give us the opportunity to keep you all in the loop of the luncheon plans and allow you to share your wonderful thoughts and ideas related to the venue, speakers, awardees and details.”

In creating this “new tradition,” Tom then notified them that the Tiffany gift bags at each of their places contained “a keepsake” for each of the past chairs to wear to all the Callier Cares Luncheon and the Past Chairs Luncheon.

Inside were boxes containing Paloma Picasso’s “Loving Heart Bracelet.”

Goes nicely with the Callier Center’s heart logo.

And only goes to prove that leadership does warrant perks.

The Focus Is On Health At Baylor Foundation’s Quarterly Board Meeting

The theme for the first Baylor Health Care System Foundation board of directors meeting of the new (2017) fiscal year may have been “Integrative Medicine: Leveraging New Perspectives for a Healthy Body, Mind and Spirit.” But it was apparent at the Tuesday, September 20th quarterly board meeting that the Foundation itself is in pretty good health, too.

Sporting a new white beard he called “an August project,” Foundation President Robin Robinson told the luncheon meeting that the organization now had raised more than $581 million for the healthcare system since its founding. The foundation has a new tagline—“Let’s Move Mountains”—Robin disclosed, and the last fiscal year was its best ever in fundraising terms. Thirty-seven million dollars came through the doors, he said, or 128 percent of the goal. The foundation also distributed $43 million to the system during the 2016 fiscal year, Robin said, bringing total disbursements over five years to $175 million.

Board Chair Margo Goodwin had good news for the board members as well. The foundation’s most recent annual Grand Rounds golf tournament was a record-breaker, Margo announced, with 229 golfers helping raise $290,000. Board giving during the last fiscal year enjoyed 100 percent participation, she went on, with 20 percent of the board members ponying up more than $25,000.

Amy Turner, Julie Turner and Margo Goodwin*

Amy Turner, Julie Turner and Margo Goodwin*

Jim Lozier and Jill Smith*

Jim Lozier and Jill Smith*

Margo also talked briefly about the responsibilities of new foundation board members. The “Class of 2017” members are: Kenneth Aboussie Jr., Barry Andrews, Norm Bagwell, Mike Barnett, Hal Brierley, Darlene Cass, Robert Dozier, Graciela Garton M.D., Jim Lozier, Holt Lunsford, Gloria Martindale, Amy Mueller (ex-officio), Michal Powell, Bruce Robson, Ken Schnitzer, Jill Smith, Bob Thomas, Amy Turner and John Yeaman.

Following lunch and a brief report from Joel Allison, the health system’s outgoing CEO—Joel said Baylor had acquired another medical center in Austin, and finalists to succeed him should be disclosed by late October—Dr. Carolyn Matthews delivered a keynote talk about how “chronic illness is burdening” the American health system in general, and what can be done about it.

Robin Robinson, Carolyn Matthews and Joel Allison*

Robin Robinson, Carolyn Matthews and Joel Allison*

Chronic illnesses such as depression, obesity (67 percent of us are overweight or obese), cancer, diabetes (10 percent of us have it), and asthma require repeated treatment, Dr. Matthews explained, and 50 percent of adults will suffer from at least one of them. But the good news, she stressed, is that all of these chronic illnesses are “very modifiable” with exercise, sleep, and a proper diet.

Several habits will help reduce your risk for chronic illness, continued Dr. Matthews, who is Director of Integrative and Functional Medicine at the Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center. Those habits include: refraining from smoking; eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day; doing some sort of physical activity (150 minutes per week is recommended, even if it’s just walking); and aiming for seven to eight hours of restful sleep per night.

During a Q&A session near the end of the meeting, someone asked Dr. Matthews why eating right seems to be so difficult for so many. “Because the vast majority of food in the grocery store is not real food,” she replied. “The quality of our food is not as good as it was 50 years ago,” she continued, citing “genetically modified food” among other trends. Ideally everyone would eat organic food if they could afford it, Dr. Matthews concluded, but, at a minimum, the meat you eat should be grass-fed and any fish should be of the small variety, like salmon.

* Photos provided by Baylor Health Care System Foundation