2017 Salesmanship Club Charitable Golf Of Dallas Provided A Record $6.8M For Momentous Institute

Despite hurricane Harvey making this weekend seem pretty darn miserable, the Momentous Institute folks are all smiley facing it.

Salesmanship Club of Dallas, AT&T Byron Nelson and Momentous Institute*

Thanks to the Salesmanship Club Charitable Golf of Dallas tournament that was held this past May, the Institute received “a record $6.8 million in net proceeds.” That translates into Institute’s being able to support “social emotional health for all children, so they can achieve their full potential.”

According to 2017 Tournament Chair Tim Costello, “This year we set out to make the AT&T Byron Nelson’s final year in Irving our best yet, and to celebrate our long relationship with the Irving community and the Four Seasons. We are grateful to the countless people who came together to make sure we raised the most we could for the kids and families we serve through Momentous Institute.”

The 2018 Tournament will be held at Trinity Forest Golf Club and will again benefit Momentous Institute.

Tucker Enthoven’s Dinner Table Was Serving Up Invitations For Celebrating Women Fundraiser With Jamie Lee Curtis

Tucker Enthoven

Celebrating Women Luncheon Chair Tucker Enthoven was getting ready to head to Spain for a bicycling trip on Tuesday, June 20. But before she left for the other side of the pond, she rallied the troops at her Preston Hollow “cottage” to address invitations for the Baylor Health Care System Foundation fundraiser on Thursday, October 26, at the Hilton Anatole to fight breast cancer.

The Enthoven dinner table

Around the table with pens in hand were outgoing Tucker’s mom Julie Ford, Baylor Foundation Board Chair Margo Goodwin, Pat McEvoy, Angie Kadesky, Suzy Gekiere, Marie Dean, Ann Dyer, Underwriting Chair Ola Fojasek‘s mother Jacqueline Fojtasek (Ola was out of town and Jacqueline was subbing in) and Barbara Stuart. On the floor was 15-year-old Australian Shepherd Stealer. He may have looked a bit long-in-the-tooth, but thanks to his titanium back leg, he was amazingly spry and greeting the ladies.

Margo Goodwin

Pat McEvoy

When asked how the fundraising efforts going, Tucker didn’t hesitate. It was right on target.

Perhaps it was the fact that the keynote speaker was Jamie Lee Curtis. With all the recent headlines about Carrie Fisher’s sad demise, fellow Hollywood urchin Jamie had taken a totally different road successfully battling drugs and alcohol, as well as the threat of breast cancer at the age of 40.

True Carrie had scored hits with “Star Wars” and writing, but Jamie had cut her own praise with “Trading Places,” “Halloween,” “Perfect,” “A Fish Called Wanda,” “True Lies” and “Freaky Friday,” plus her 12 children’s books, including New York Times best seller “Today I Feel Silly: And Other Moods That Make My Day.”

In the past 17 years,  the Celebrating Women Luncheon has raised more than $28M “to help Baylor Scott And White fight breast cancer in North Texas.”

Blue butterfly stamps

The invitations were scheduled to drop in the snail mail the week of August 14. They’ll be easy to spot thanks to the blue butterfly stamps. If you haven’t gotten yours, don’t pout or stew. Just check in here and let them know you want your seat pronto. And if you’re interested in a sponsorship, you’d better hustle. The sponsorships for the invitations, centerpieces, programs and video have already been sold.

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Cattle Baron’s Ball

According to 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill,

Anne Stodghill and Sunie Solomon (File photo)

The Cattle Baron’s Ball relies on the spirit and generosity of the Metroplex to fund the fight against cancer. Since 1974, we’ve raised more than $71 million for cancer research, the majority of which is conducted right here in DFW. True to Texas’ history of rising to the challenge, we’ve become the world’s largest single-night fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.

While some might be hand-wringing at the prospect of continuing a legacy of ensuring more cancer research dollars are spent in Dallas than anywhere else in the country, they probably aren’t familiar with the members of the Cattle Baron’s Ball. Fortunately, the Cattle Baron’s Ball Committee is not comprised of the faint-of-heart – as evidenced by the fact that the CBB is the largest single-night fundraiser in the nation for cancer research through the American Cancer Society.

Join the fight and help us continue to make a difference! Cattle Baron’s Ball continues to support the American Cancer Society in the following incredible ways:

  • Provided more than 30,000 services to cancer patients in North Texas
  • Gave 7,414 rides to and from treatment
  • More than 1,500 free wigs were provided free of charge to cancer patients
  • More than 1,000 breast cancer patients were visited by our Reach to Recovery volunteers
  • Helped to enact strong state and local smoke-free laws that protect workers and the public from the dangers of secondhand smoke
  • Connected patients with more than 64,000 different treatment options, through our Clinical Trials Matching Service
  • Found the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer

Brooks and Dunn*

Dust off your boots and join us at Gilley’s on Saturday, October 21, for some serious Texas barbecue, the best silent and live auctions in town, followed by a heart-stopping performance from award-winning country and western entertainers Brooks and Dunn.

Everyone knows someone affected by cancer. From attending the ball to purchasing a raffle ticket, get involved with Cattle Baron’s Ball however you can and help us continue making a difference. 

Visit www.cattlebaronsball.com.

* Photo provided by 
2017 Cattle Baron's 
Ball

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 2017 Patriot Party

According to 2017 Patriot Party Co-Chairs Laura and Dennis Moon,

Dennis and Laura Moon (File photo)

There are many reasons why people become homeless. Sometimes it’s because of bad decisions that spiral out of control. Others end up on the streets because of factors beyond their control. Mental illness and domestic violence are two major culprits.

Housing Crisis Center works to put those who can take care of themselves back on the road to self-sufficiency. For those who are permanently disabled, we’re here to make sure they have a safe place to call home and access to the services they need. Help us make it happen.

Housing Crisis Center has been preventing homelessness for almost 40 years. Many of our clients are veterans with crippling mental disorders such as PTSD. They typically are unable to live on their own, but with supportive services can remain safely housed.

We make sure they live with dignity. Others are families with children who have recently becomes homeless due to domestic violence, an unforeseen expense, or bad decisions resulting from lack of financial education. Through financial assistance and intensive coaching, we get them back on their feet with the skills they need to avoid becoming homeless ever again. 

Housing Crisis Center 2017 Patriot Party*

You can be a part of the solution by supporting the Patriot Party on Friday, November 3, at the George W. Bush Institute. This year’s theme, Colors of Courage, reflects our respect for the brave women and men who have so ably served our country.

The evening’s festivities include cocktails, silent and live auctions, buffet dinner and entertainment. Please make plans to join us by visiting www.hccdallas.org.


* Graphic provided by Housing Crisis Center

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 16th Annual Boots and Bandanas

According to 16th Annual Boots and Bandanas Co-Chair Meg Frainey,

It’s that time again ladies and gents! Grab your Stetsons and get ready to have a boot scootin’ good time in support of campers with disabilities. Camp Summit‘s 16th Annual Boots and Bandanas Benefit Dinner and Auction will be held on Thursday, November 2, at Eddie Deen’s Ranch in Downtown Dallas. You don’t want to miss it! With good ol’ Texas BBQ and entertainment, including live and silent auctions, wine pulls, and live Texas music from Shoot Low Sheriff, it’s sure to be an evening to remember!

Bonnie Webb, Amy Trammell and Brittany Bradberry*

Every year, hundreds of professionals, business leaders, donors, and supporters in the DFW area attend Boots and Bandanas, bringing in thousands of dollars in support of our remarkable campers. All proceeds from the event benefit Camp Summit and our barrier-free camping programs for children and adults with disabilities. The support of our sponsors, donors and volunteers ensures that our remarkable campers will always have a camp to call their own.

We have numerous sponsorship opportunities available, so grab a ticket, reserve a table, or even sponsor our saloon!  Register online to secure your tickets today! Visit the event website at www.campsummittx.org/boots for more information and to complete your online registration. 

If you would like to donate an item for our auction please contact Jeanie Lawson at [email protected] or 972-484-8900 ext. 109.  Small and large items are welcome! If you are interested in volunteering for the event or becoming involved with the event committee, please contact Georgia White at [email protected] or 972.484.8900 ext. 107.

We look forward to seeing you there!

* Photo provided by Camp Summit


Anna And Raj Asava Kick Off The Newly Established North Texas Food Bank Indo-American Council With A $100,000 Donation

The North Texas community is a tapestry of amazing people representing a cornucopia of cultures. The main common denominator is that they all share the desire to make the lives of their neighbors and strangers better.

Anna Asava, Trisha Cunningham and Raj Asava*

How about an example? Aradhana “Anna” and Raj Asava. They are part of North Texas’ Indo-American community which “has grown exponentially over the years, with nearly 200,000 people in our region.” The Asavas recognized a great opportunity to have their fellow Indo-Americans partner up with the North Texas Food Bank.

According to Raj, “Anna and I are passionate about the work of the North Texas Food Bank and we wanted to raise awareness around the issue of hunger that exists right here in North Texas.

In addition to creating the North Texas Food Bank’s Indo-American Council (NTFB-IAC), they put their money where their hearts are by pledging a $100,000 donation to the NTFB “in conjunction with the launch of NTFB’s Indo-American Council, which the couple will co-chair.”  

With “prominent members of the community” already signing on board to support the initiative, “the NTFB-IAC has set its sights to fund one million meals per year.”

Anna added, “We are excited to launch the NTFB-IAC to raise hunger awareness, community involvement, as well as channel the resources and contributions of the Indo-American community towards the mission of NTFB.”

Commenting about the Asavas’ mission, NTFB President/CEO Trisha Cunningham said, “The Asavas are determined leaders. Having just one of them help would be transformational. I count us doubly lucky to have them both by our side. Anna and Raj, have a clear vision for the Indo-American Council and with their donation, they have already put 300,000 meals on the table for our hungry neighbors. I am certain that their share enthusiasm and drive will be a draw for their peers, helping raise awareness for the critical issue of hunger and ultimately will help the NTFB reach our goal of providing 92 million meals by 2025.”

Operation Kindness Pet Food Pantry And Royal Vaccination Fund To Assist Pets Of Financially Strapped Families

This past Saturday area animal shelters were busier than a bee at the Arboretum. The occasion was “Clear The Shelters,” that literally adopted out a lot of the pooches and felines. The Dallas Animal Shelter alone found new homes for 324 dogs and cats.

Of the thousands of animals at area shelters, some are strays, but many are family pets that have been turned in due to lack of funds. According to Operation Kindness CEO Jim Hanophy, “Economic reasons account for 25% of the pets surrendered per year.”

That’s right. Many man’s best friends and felines had to be turned in because the money just wasn’t there for food and health care.

Adopted cat (File photo)

In the past the North Texas Food Bank’s Food 4 Paws and the North Texas Food Pantry have helped provide food for pets whose human companions are strapped for funds.

Recently, the North Texas Pet Food Pantry has relinquished its program to Operation Kindness. The new program will be called Operation Kindness Pet Food Pantry.

North Texas Food Pantry President/Founder Cheryl Spencer reported, “I’m so honored that the hard work and effort that went into the North Texas Pet Food Pantry will be sustained by Operation Kindness. This pet food pantry is such a vital part of the community and I’m grateful that it will be continued on.”

In addition to providing free pet food, cat litter and flea and tick prevention for up to three months, Operation Kindness is “launching the Royal Vaccination Fund to help provide low-income families with access to rabies, parvo and distemper vaccinations. This program is inspired by an Operation Kindness foster family who experienced the devastation of distemper, when their foster dog Princess lost six puppies to distemper.”

Survivor of distemper (File photo)

To get things rolling Artist for Animals has “matched the first donation of $2,500.”

Anyone who has seen a dog suffer from this incredible painful and contagious disease knows that this undertaking is an excellent idea.

Of course, Operation Kindness is eager to have donations of money and dog and cat food from individuals and companies. But the Carrollton-based, no-kill adoption center is also looking for volunteers “to assist with donations and supply pick up and pet food distribution.”

Any pet owner in need of the services provided by Operation Kindness Pet Food Pantry or the Royal Vaccination Fund can apply online. Once they qualify for the programs, they can pick up for the food at Operation Kindness on the third Saturday and Second Wednesday of every month between noon and 3 p.m.  Eventually, the plan calls for distribution locations throughout the community.

Jim’s vision is “a world where all cats and dogs have loving, responsible, forever homes and this pantry is going to help keep pets out of shelters and in their homes.”

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Spirit Of Generations Award Luncheon

According to The Senior Source’s 2017 Spirit of Generations Award Luncheon Chair
Carol Huckin,

Carol Huckin*

We have some big changes happening at this year’s Spirit of Generations Award Luncheon. First of all, we will be gathering at a different venue when we present this year’s award to Diane and John Scovell, whose civic engagement, entrepreneurial vision and outstanding leadership have helped transform the Dallas landscape. For those who may not know, John is the Co-Founder/Chairman of Woodbine Development Corporation. His first project, and the one that remains his pride and joy, was the Hyatt Regency with its landmark Reunion Tower. As such, the event will be held there. The luncheon will also be held earlier than in years’ past, so mark your calendars now for Tuesday, October 31, from 12 to 1:30 p.m., at the Hyatt Regency.

The Scovells’ contributions—in real estate, education, the nonprofit sector and more—have had a huge impact on our community and they will continue to benefit generations to come. We are thrilled to be honoring them.”

Diane and John Scovell**

But, don’t worry. Amidst these changes, some things will certainly stay the same, like the luncheon’s trademark humor and brevity.

The Spirit luncheon is The Senior Source’s biggest event of the year—bringing together 1,000 supporters to celebrate the honorees’ universal appeal and ageless spirit that transcend the generations. Monies raised at the event are critical to The Senior Source’s operation of programs and services which are provided to more than 30,000 older adults annually through community engagement, support, independence, advocacy, financial security and protection.

Individual patron tickets begin at $150, and tables start at $1500. For more information, please call 214. 823.5700 ext. 6120 or [email protected].”

About The Senior Source
Since 1961, The Senior Source has served greater Dallas as the go-to nonprofit for aging services.  The agency offers personalized assistance, protection, and connection support to all older adults in greater Dallas for these individuals to “Thrive.” A United Way service provider, The Senior Source offers comprehensive programs for those 50 years of age and older. For more information, contact The Senior Source at 214.823.5700 or visit www.theseniorsource.org. You can also find The Senior Source on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/theseniorsource or Twitter using the handle @theseniorsource. 

* Photo credit: Kristina Bowman 
** Photo provided by The Senior Source

JUST IN: Texas Fav Pat Green To “Shoot For The Stars” For Cattle Baron’s Ball On The Winston And Strawn Live Auction Stage At Gilley’s

There’s been a question floating in the Cattle Baron’s Ball universe — Who will be on the Winston and Strawn Live Auction Stage at Gilley’s on Saturday, October 21?

Pat Green (File photo)

CBB Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill have finally provided the answer. It will be the troubadour of Texas, Pat Green. It seems like he’s been everywhere lately, but Sunie and Anne managed to lock him down to get the tempo in overdrive and the arms warmed up to raise the paddles for the live auction of luxury packages that will follow his concert.

After the bidding workout, the crowd will mosey on over to the Texas-sized tent for a concert by Brooks and Dunn.

All types of underwriting opportunities are available now, but they’re stampeding out of sight. As for the individual tickets, they go on sale on Friday, September 1.

BTW, don’t forget to buy your tickets for killer raffle items. After all, it’s time for a new set of wheels from Park Place, a $10,000 debit card from PlainsCapital Bank, a Rolex Oyster Perpetual Lady Datejust 28 from Eiseman, a $10,000 shopping spree at Highland Park Village, or a dreamy three-night stay at Chileno Bay. Wouldn’t it be a little piece of heaven to win all the raffle items? Buy your outfit at HP Village, drive to the airport in your Park Place wheels, lease a private jet with your debit card and show off the time to all the other guests at Chileno Bay. Talk about “dreaming as big as Texas”! If you want to get a head start on the herd, you’ll need to call CBB offices (214.443.9222) or corral one of the Baronesses because you can’t buy raffle tickets online. Boo-hoo.

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Meal For The Minds Luncheon

According to Metrocare Services CEO Dr. John W. Burruss,

John W. Burruss*

Emmitt Smith*

NFL and Cowboy Hall-of-Famer Emmitt Smith will speak to the 2017 Meal for the Minds audience this year.  Mr. Smith is renowned and respected not only for his Super Bowl championships and NFL achievements, but also for his substantial success in business and his goodwill and generosity.  His extraordinary life provides him a unique platform to influence others about mental health care issues.  Mr. Smith encourages everyone to speak openly about the need to seek help while advocating for increased access to mental health care.

Metrocare Services celebrates our 50th anniversary this year! In 1967, no one spoke publicly about mental illness.  In 2017, the stigma of mental illness is lessened because of those with the courage to speak out and those with the means to support them.  Last year, as a result of this community’s willingness to battle the challenge of stigma, Metrocare helped over 57,000 adults and children with mental health needs and/or developmental disabilities, more than ever before!

The goal for Dallas must be complete elimination of this stigma.  It’s an honor to have Mr. Smith further that goal by speaking at Metrocare’s Meal for the Minds on how we can each play a role in “breaking the silence, fighting the stigma and changing minds.”

To amplify his and all of our voices, NBC 5 will be our media sponsor to assist us in promoting this year’s Meal for the Minds. Additionally, NBC 5 will continue to build awareness of Metrocare’s wide range of programs for those who need mental health care, services for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, primary care, housing, and supportive services.

The 2017 Meal for the Minds luncheon will be held Thursday, October 5, at the Hilton Anatole Hotel.  The silent auction begins at 11:00 a.m. and the lunch program begins at 11:45 a.m.  Individual tickets for the luncheon are $150 each and sponsorship opportunities begin at $1,500.  For tickets or sponsor information, please visit our website at www.metrocareservies.org/events.  For questions, contact Tameka Y. Cass at 214.743.1220 or email [email protected]

* Photo provided by Metrocare

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Power Of Pie

Meaders Ozarow (File photo)

According to Power of Pie Co-Founder Meaders Ozarow,

A couple of us started Power of Pie as a way to add an accessible opportunity for charitable giving to the VNA fund raising effort.  We have so many volunteers and supporters that would like to give at the $25 or $50 level and this gives them something in return. Power of Pie, the fundraising campaign benefiting VNA Meals on Wheels and Hospice Care, is back for its 5th year!  Pumpkin and pecan pies are sold for $25 each, and thanks to the generosity of many of Dallas’ best bakers, 100% of the money comes to VNA.  It allows people to feed more than just their own family at Thanksgiving.

From Thursday, September 7, through Monday, November 13, supporters can log on to www.powerofpie.org and purchase pumpkin or pecan pies and pick up Tuesday, November 21-Wednesday, November 22—just in time for Thanksgiving.

The official listing of chefs for 2017 will be released in October. Participating chefs in 2016 included Jill Bates of Fearing’s, Gianni Santin of Haute Sweets, Chad Houser at Cafe Momentum, Danyele McPherson at Remedy and HG Supply, Nicolas Blouin at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek, John Tesar of Knife and Anastacia Quiñones of Oddfellows. Additionally, Dallas treasures such as Abacus, The Anatole, Brook Hollow Golf Club, Central Market, Collin College, Empire Baking Company, Experimental Catering, The Fairmont, The Gaylord, Hattie’s, The Joule, Lakewood Country Club, The Ritz-Carlton, as well as well-known Dallas pie institutions, Norma’s and Uncle Willie’s, have also participated.  We are spending the summer adding more notable chefs and restaurants to the list!

VNA pecan pie*

VNA Zero Calorie pie*

VNA pumpkin pie*

If you are out of town for Thanksgiving, we also have an option. Our Zero Calorie Pie gives donors the opportunity to support the campaign without receiving an actual pie. Over the past four years, Power of Pie has raised more than $125,000 for VNA! And we hope to make 2017 the biggest year yet!

We love it since we love feeding people and a good pie really shows the love! 

* Graphics provided by VNA

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 2017 Methodist Health System Folsom Leadership Award

According to Methodist Health System Folsom Leadership Award Co-Chairs Lottye and Bobby B. Lyle,

Bobby and Lottye Lyle (File photo)

We, along with Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt, Jeanne L. Phillips and Gail and Gerald Turner, are co-chairs for the 2017 Methodist Health System Folsom Leadership Award. This year, our good friend, David B. Miller, is the honoree, and we will celebrate him on Wednesday, October 25, at a dinner from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Hilton Anatole Hotel. This award was established in 2005 to recognize individuals who have demonstrated commitment and excellence in community leadership, and who emulate the achievements of the late Dallas Mayor Robert S. Folsom.

David Miller (File photo)

We feel very strongly that David Miller clearly exemplifies Bob Folsom’s legacy as a revered community leader, serving Dallas with integrity, humility, and respect. Like Bob, David’s leadership as an entrepreneur and business pioneer, as well as his caring manner, generosity and concerns for others who are less fortunate, have made a lasting impact on Dallas.

This year is particularly poignant because of the recent passing of Bob Folsom.  We hope to make this a very special year, as we pay tribute to Bob as well.

For those who may have not attended any of the Folsom events in the past, the evening is very personalized for the recipient.  We will continue that tradition as we recognize David.  You can count on some fun and unexpected surprises! It is David’s evening, so we’ll focus on his life—from his favorite activities (think basketball) to his favorite foods and favorite charitable causes, as well as the some of the people who have had an influence on his life!  We hope you’ll join us in honoring one of Dallas’ most admired citizens.

All proceeds from the annual dinner will go to support the good work of Methodist Health System.  Sponsors who contribute $10,000 or more will be recognized as Leadership Circle Donors and will receive an invitation to attend the Patron Party, hosted by President George W. Bush and Laura Bush (she’s a 2008 Folsom award recipient) in the fall.

Those interested in supporting the Robert S. Folsom Award can contact Methodist Health System Foundation Vice President Joy Duncan, at 214.947.4602 or [email protected]. More information is available at https://foundation.methodisthealthsystem.org/events/folsom/.

The Family Place’s Dream Of 50,000-Square-Foot Ann Moody Place Became A Reality For Those Escaping A Nightmare Of Abuse

Paige Flink

While gobs of women gathered in the Anatole’s Imperial Ballroom to learn about leadership and opportunities at the D CEO Women’s Leadership Symposium on Friday, June 2, The Family Place CEO Paige Flink was standing on a couch in the Ann Moody Place lobby. She had wanted to attend the Anatole event, but on this day her priority was leading the army of workers and staffers in preparing for the Sunday reception for the new Ann Moody Place, with an expected attendance of 300. At this moment she was personally placing the artwork so it was just right.

Major donors for Ann Moody Place

But the artwork on two other walls in the reception area were Paige’s pride and joy. They were masterpieces — simple signs with the names of the major donors who had made this remarkable place come into being.

When TFP opened in the 1970s, domestic abuse was still in the closet and remained there for a couple of decades. According to Paige, who first volunteered at TFP and then was named executive director in 1997, that all changed dramatically in the mid-1990s. When asked what the turning point was, Paige explained, “Thanks to OJ Simpson, the world changed.” It was a wake-up call that if “a celebrity, who had made a phone call and tried to get her husband arrested and couldn’t,” how could a regular human being get help? As a result, domestic violence “became a household word,” laws started to change and “then our visibility grew starting in 1996.”

The need for shelter spurred TFP to create its Safe Campus with 110 beds in the early 2000s, but more was needed as the number of clients and their needs grew. It was in the early 2010s that Paige and TFP board undertook a daunting project to build another campus — a $13M, 40,000-square-foot facility in the medical district that would provide shelter, office and programming areas and child-care facilities. In May 2015, TFP acquired the site for their 2.42-acre dream child. Then on Thursday, October 1, 2015, it was announced at the annual Texas Trailblazer Luncheon that the The Moody Foundation had donated $5M for the project’s “The Legacy Campaign” chaired by Lynn McBee.

But as they delved into the effort, they realized more square footage and funding were needed. The size was increased to 50,000 square feet, and the goal was a whopping $16.5M.  And then there were construction surprises, like having to drill down 70 feet to hit bedrock. Still, TFP team and board directors not only managed to meet that goal, they raised $16.898M.

The facility is projected to handle 2,000 clients a year. Paige said that while the average age of their clients is 29, they do get seniors — “The oldest person we have ever served was 78 years old.”

But back to the tour of the three-story buildings that now make up the compound of safety and education.  On a wall there was a healthy smudge, evidently resulting from the non-stop moving of equipment and furniture. Paige was not a happy camper spying the imperfection. TFP VP of Development Melissa Sherrill understood, saying, “It’s like a new car. You don’t want to see the first imperfection.” But then she assured Paige that it would be gone with the final sweep of the touch-up crew.

Children’s pantry shelves

As busy as the move-in scene may have sounded, the years of planning, designing, discussing and fundraising were coming together, with the results being bigger and better than even Paige had first imagined. Nothing had been left out. There were various dining, food preparation, counseling, training, meeting, quiet and groups rooms, as well as a computer lab, a one-chair hair salon (“JoAnn’s Room”) and a wing for children’s needs provided by Crystal Charity Ball. Proudly, Paige pointed to a large storeroom with shelved walls for canned goods and toys. Why would canned goods be needed? Paige explained that for clients making the transition out of an abusive home life, they might have to explain their whereabouts to their abuser upon returning home and could simply say they went to the food bank.

Food pantry shelves

Thanks to a relationship with UT Southwestern Medical School, second-year residents will be brought to the Place by a doctor to see the clients at the in-house mini-clinic that includes examination and dental rooms. But, always searching for more, Paige adds, “The other volunteer opportunities here are for medical doctors to come to give me some night-time clinic. I have a pediatrician, but I could use more pediatricians and general medicine and gynecology.”

Dental facility

Examination room

Throughout the multiple levels were signs re-enforcing the purpose of TFP — “Take a breath. You are safe,” “The best thing to hold onto in life is each other” and “Difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations.” Even the pillows from the Pillow Bar are embroidered with “Dream BIG.”  

Ann Moody Place signage

Ann Moody Place bed

Bedroom suite bathroom

The residential area of apartments were painted in a blue that Paige had discovered in Charleston, South Carolina, because it was both soothing and timeless.  There are family suites and individual rooms with bathrooms and closets.

Paige Flink Healing Garden in center courtyard

In the center of the campus was a two-level courtyard. The upper level was the Make It Count Children’s Playground. The lower was the Paige Flink Healing Garden. When asked if the children’s area could use a misting system to combat the summer heat, Paige didn’t hesitate, “If someone would give me one, I wouldn’t hesitate!”

Bird Flying free of a cage sculpture

Judy Walgren’s photos

There were interior designers  like Jan Showers, Mecox, Shay Geyer, Wisteria, Christy Drew and Mary Cates, who had provided directions and resources to create a safe and nurturing environment. Utilizing art as therapy for both adults and children, Moody Place showcases local talent. In addition to encouraging artists to contribute, art-loving Joyce Goss curated “Retail is Art” for high school students to provide the collection of art showcasing food in one of the dining rooms. It turned out that all the artists were women. Rebecca Aguilar helped get Latina artists to contribute. A former client had given two sculptures. One was a woman holding an open cage in one hand and a freed bird in the other. On the wall of Paige’s corner officer overlooking the campus were photographer Judy Walgren‘s Pulitzer Prize winning photos of past TFP clients.

Lockers

Travis Hollman and his company had created walls of lockers for the clients to safe keep documents and paperwork. Paige admitted that the need was the result of client focus groups.

Melissa Sherrill in Barkingham Palace

The SPCA had been a fabulous resource on how to run the Barkingham Palace, a kennel that included a washing machine, dryer and even a quiet room for families to spend time with their pets. While that had been underwritten, Paige admitted that the food was still in need of financial support.

Looking out on the grounds from a third-level terrace, Paige limited photography of the exterior of the building or the surrounding area. No photo could be taken that might hint of Moody Place’s location. Security had been a priority in every aspect of its creation because that was the first step for her clients’ recovery from lives of fear and abuse. As Paige said, “Once you’re behind the walls, you’re totally secure.”

Ann Moody Place is breathtaking and unfortunately so needed. That’s why Paige admitted that her future will be filled with fundraising for its operation. Her hope is you will support Moody Place, but never need it.

For more photos of Ann Moody Place, check MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

The Inspiration Of A Girl’s Grandparents Lives At The Cotton Bowl To Support The Battle Against Alzheimer’s

It was nearly 20 years ago that a teenager faced a daunting problem — her beloved grandmother, Mimi Schendle, was changing and not for the better. Over the next decade, the teenager watched her family helplessly assist Mimi’s journey into the web of Alzheimer’s. Like most diseases, this one doesn’t just impact the patient alone. It hits each member of the family. In this case, the girl’s grandfather, JosephJoe-Joe” Schendle, compassionately and tirelessly cared for his wife, as their children and grandchildren supported the elderly couple.

When Mimi died in 2008, the now 20-something decided she was going to find a way to provide funding for research to battle the disease that had touched all ages of her family. Being in the marketing business, she decided to undertake a project that would involve others her age. But to do that it had to be something that was fun while also fundraising. She had heard about a powder-puff football game that had raised some money in Washington, D.C., for Alzheimer’s. That seemed like a good idea, but fundraising vets were skeptical of her plan.

Perhaps it was the fact that she hadn’t faced such a major task like that before that she charged ahead with only the goal in her mind. The reality of the logistics hadn’t really set in that first year. Her 14-year-old sister ran the scoreboard and her close buddy Greer Fulton was quarterback for one side. And, of course, the soaring August heat made more than mascara melt. But she was driven by the memory of the previous ten years, and she had friends. Those two ingredients resulted in the first Blondes vs. Brunettes football game in 2008.

Blondes enter the field (File photo)

Brunettes enter the field (File photo)

Over the next ten years, there were changes. The name was changed to BvB Dallas. The location of the game moved all over (Griggs Field, Highland Park High School’s Highlander Stadium, SMU’s Wescott Field, Bishop Lynch’s Roffino Stadium) and finally in 2014 to its present scene at the Cotton Bowl. Some years the Blondes won. Some years the Brunettes did. Through personal experiences, it was also learned that Alzheimer’s was not limited to the elderly.

Ebby Halliday and Dan Branch (File photo)

As some players aged out, others came on board to practice all summer. And the nets changed, too, resulting in the following:

  • 2008 — $65,000
  • 2009 — $151,000
  • 2010 — $207,000
  • 2011 — $260,000
  • 2012 — $340,000
  • 2013 — $351,000
  • 2014 — $441,000
  • 2015 — $491,000
  • 2016 — $564,000

But there were also constants, like the late Ebby Halliday and her real estate empire, Bud Light and The Ticket coming and staying on board. 

And there was the girl, who was now a 33-year-old married lady, who had a full-time job at the Dallas Mavericks as Corporate Communications and Events Director. But she hadn’t ended her involvement in the event that had handed over more than $2.8M for Alzheimer’s programs.

Greer Fulton, Jay Finegold and Erin Finegold (File photo)

On Saturday, August 12, plans call for the game to pass the $3M mark and provide this year’s funds to the Baylor AT&T Memory Center, the Center for BrainHealth, UT Southwestern Medical Center, and the Center for Vital Longevity. And once again, BvB Dallas Founder/Mimi’s and Joe-Joe’s granddaughter Erin Finegold White will be on the sidelines at the Cotton Bowl and on the frontline in the war against Alzheimer’s.

A Gentle Reminder: Hot Times In The Old Town

Today is supposed to be the hottest one so far this year. The thermometers should hit 101 degrees around 3, but it’s gonna feel like 108. The good news is that the weather guessers are promising a cold front is on its way. Did you get start putting your sundresses in rest mode and reawake those cashmere sweaters?

Oops! The guessers’ understanding of “cold front” is different from normal folks. Their weather maps are transitioning from Dragon’s Breath red to a Carolina Reaper red.

Now that’s a real cold front (File photo)

Even the thought of heading to the pool and slathering on sunscreen seems like a prison sentence. Others have scattered to such places as the Hamptons, Colorado and the West Coast. For the rest of those left behind, it’s chilling under misters on patios with icy drinks or sidling up next the air-conditioning vent.

However, for kids, the elderly and pets, the heat can be dangerous. Consider how

  • Vehicles can become ovens within minutes.
  • Dehydration drains strength.
  • In an attempt to save money, some cut off on electricity resulting in suffocating conditions.
  • Normal friendly playground playsets can sizzle burning munchkins.
  • Hot pavements may not bother stilettos and sneakers, but they can hurt feet and paws.

Realize that the most vulnerable in the community are very susceptible to the raging temperatures.

It’s Their Time’s First Fundraiser Paid Off With A Six-Figure Grant For Dr. Roger Rosenberg’s Alzheimer’s Research

Leave it to Leslie Ann Crozier to get her dander up about a problem and do something about it. When Alzheimer’s hit a family members, she did more than  just talk to doctors. She put together a foundation — It’s Their Time — and held a splashy get together  at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek on  Tuesday, May 23 with the likes of Dr. Roger Rosenberg and Pete Delkus. And, boy, did it pay off! Here’s a report from the field:

Roger Rosenberg, Leslie Ann Crozier and Pete Delkus*

Established within 116 days ago by founder Leslie Ann Crozier, It’s Their Time held a Kick-Off Celebration on Tuesday, May 23, to a sold-out audience at The Mansion on Turtle Creek. As a result of the event, Dallas’ newest foundation committed to advancing research for Alzheimer’s was able to present a $100,000 grant to award world-renowned Dr. Roger Rosenberg of UT Southwestern Medical Center for his DNA Vaccine. 

Mark Goldberg and Anne Lacey*

Tom Bevins and Clint Henderson*

Jana Hayes, Nancy Solomon, Diane depoi and Barbara Moroney*

“It was a magical evening filled with love, laughter, and lots of support. The generosity of all our May 23rd guests including Tom Bevins, Clint Henderson, Anne Lacey, Melissa and Steve Brooks, Dr. Mark Goldberg, Jana Hayes, Nancy Solomon, Diane Depoi and Barbara Moroney was overwhelming. Being able to award Dr. Rosenberg a $100,000 Grant from the evening proceeds exceeded all of our Committee’s expectations, especially given that the Charity is only a couple of months old,” confirmed Leslie Ann Crozier.

Guests enjoyed a festive cocktail celebration filled with lots of surprises . . . and pictures with Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders.

Dallas’ favorite meteorologist, WFAA Pete Delkus, was the evening’s Master of Ceremonies and was welcomed by “thunderous” applause, as the ballroom filled with sounds of thunder and lightning!  Pete was to leave halfway through the program to get back to the TV station; however, he was having so much fun that he stayed until the Live Auction and rushed to make the 10:00 p.m. ABC News. During the 10:00pm broadcast, Pete shared fun pictures and evening highlights.

When Leslie took the stage and shared five shocking Alzheimer’s statistics with the audience . . . you could have heard a pin drop. One of the most surprising facts was that women in their 60s are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s during their life as they are to develop breast cancer.

After a powerful video introduction, the evening’s recipient, Dr. Roger Rosenberg, took the stage to a standing ovation. He unveiled his UT Southwestern Medical Center Press Release, sent out just hours earlier, announcing that his DNA Vaccine “is on a shortlist of promising antibody treatments” that may prevent or cure Alzheimer’s.

Aubree-Anna*

Popular singer songwriter Aubree-Anna sang “Wind Beneath My Wings” and “Over The Rainbow” as tears flowed throughout the ballroom. 

The evening wrapped up with a spectacular Live Auction that included 3 of Leslie’s young 20-something nieces/nephews bidding $8,500 and winning the Lady Gaga Box Suite.  The audience was in shock, as Leslie’s nephew, Collin, took the stage and explained that they really only had $85 . . . however his 90-year-old grandparents, who could not attend, bought the package absentee to support the family and the Charity! 

The It’s Their Time Committee deserves a heroic round of applause, especially Strategic Planning Chair Steve Crozier, Event Chair Carol Hall, Advertising and Public Relations C0-Chairs Barbara and Stan Levenson and Creative Co-Chairs Alison Wood and Paula Feinberg

Evening Sponsors whose contributions helped make the evening an even greater success, include:

  • Champions of Hope ($10,000) — Lee Bailey, Melissa and Stephen Brooks/Grand Homes and Leslie Ann Crozier
  • Advocates for Advanced Research ($5,000) — Chris Bright, Gordy Ceresino, Jana Hayes, Hot On! Homes and Nancy and Gerald Solomon

As the first fundraising chapter comes to a close, It’s Their Time friends and supporters are looking forward to a rewarding journey creating a storybook filled with many more events, and many more memories.

For more information on It’s Their Time or to support It’s Their Time’s ongoing efforts for Advancing Research for Alzheimer’s, visit www.itstheirtime.org.  

* Photo provided by It's Their Time

In Addition To Naming Three New Trustees, Presbyterian Communities And Services Board Has Promoted President Tim Mallad To CEO

Was it just about a year ago that Tim Mallad joined Presbyterian Communities and Services as president? Sure was. Now, word arrives that Tim has been named CEO of the not-for-profit organization.

Tim Mallad (File photo)

According to PCS Board of Trustees Chair Phil Wentworth, “I am continuously impressed by Tim’s genuine passion for our mission and ability to lead our organization in the right direction. Mallad, much like our board, is focused on enriching the lives of seniors, making a meaningful difference and providing exemplary care and support for seniors and their families. We are focused on growth with the expansion of Presbyterian Village North, the opening of the T. Boone Pickens Hospice and Palliative Care Center and the master plan which is currently underway at Grace Presbyterian Village.”

In addition to Tim’s taking on the new title, three new board members have been named — Laura Wright, Liza Lee and Allen Tilley. They will be joining current trustees Ronald J. Gafford, L. Gerald “Jerry” Bryant, Dr. Lisa H. Clark, Cornelius “Neil” Foote, Dr. Rebecca Gruchalla, Douglas D. Hawthorne, Cynthia K. Hudgins, Ellen H. Masterson, Andrew Meyercord, Brad Nitschke and Michael Wright.

Phil added, “The new board members are fantastic additions to an already impressive board, and I believe together with Tim, we will expand our mission even further by growing our organization.”

JUST IN: Tracy Rathbun’s Husband Will Celebrate His 20th Anniversary Heading Up The March Of Dimes Dallas Signature Chefs Auction

When the March of Dimes Dallas Signature Chefs Auction was just three years old back in 1997, there was young fellow who was making a name for himself in these parts. In addition to his day job of cooking in area restaurants, he offered to take the lead for the fundraiser.

Tracy Rathbun and her husband (File photo)

Back then he was known as Kent Rathbun, but due to a legal quagmire he’s known nowadays as restaurateur “Tracy Rathbun’s husband.”  

But the namelessness hasn’t stopped his support, involvement and leadership in the March of Dimes Dallas’ “premiere fundraising gala,” that will take place on Thursday, November 2, at the Omni Dallas Hotel.

To celebrate his 20th anniversary as Lead Chef of Dallas Signature Chefs, Mr. Rathbun has once again assembled some of the top and most generous chefs to provide chef samplings, as well as a live auction “featuring unique dining experiences.”

David Holben (File photo)

Chad Houser (File photo)

Janice Provost and Abraham Salum (File photo)

The gathering of chefs includes: Damian Avila of Lockhart Smokehouse, Jermaine Brown of Great Scott, Carlos Capistran of Shinsei, Donald Chalko of Texas Spice – Omni Dallas Hotel, Richard Chamberlain of Chamberlain’s Steak and Chop House and Fish Market Grill, John Coleman of Savor Gastropub, Dwight Harvey of Off the Bone Barbecue, David Holben of Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse, Chad Houser of Café Momentum, Jeffrey Kollinger of Tillman’s Roadhouse, Dan Landsberg of Dragonfly – Hotel Zaza, Carlos Mancera of Republic, Sonny Pache of Ocean Prime Dallas, Tom Parlo of The Mansion Restaurant – Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek, Janice Provost of Parigi, Mico Rodriguez of Mesero and Meso Maya, Abraham Salum of Salum Restaurant, Jim Severson of Sevy’s Grill, Nathan Tate of Boulevardier and Rapscallion, John Tesar of Knife and Chris Vogeli of III Forks.

Jim Severson (File photo)

John Tesar (File photo)

This one is a true graze and gaze around with loads of people watching. Start those diets now, because the tickets are available here.

Plans Announced For Luncheon Celebrating Susan G. Komen’s 35th Anniversary With Giuliana Rancic As Keynote Speaker

Breast cancer all too often was a death sentence or at least an excruciating journey, both physically and emotionally. In the early 1950’s The New York Times “refused to publish an ad for a breast cancer support group, stating that it would not print the words ‘breast’ or ‘cancer.’”

Despite the mammogram being developed in 1969, it still hid behind a cloak of limited knowledge and a patient’s embarrassment. The routine was for a patient to be anesthetized for a biopsy. If the results were positive, a radical mastectomy was immediately performed while the patient was still under anesthesia.

The situation changed slightly in the early 1970’s when such well-knowns as Shirley Temple Black, Betty Ford and Happy Rockefeller revealed that they had indeed undergone breast cancer surgery.

Even so, treatments, developments, funding and awareness were limited. Breast cancer continued its charge. But in 1977 the disease picked the wrong person — a 33-year-old woman from Peoria, Illinois. After a three-year battle, the young woman died. But before Susan Goodman Komen succumbed to the disease, her feisty 30-year-old kid sister made a promise — she would “do everything possible to end the shame, pain, fear and hopelessness caused by this disease.”

That sister was Nancy Goodman Brinker, who would establish a world-changing program to bring breast cancer out of the closet with the goal of putting an end to it. In 1982, with the help of Nancy’s husband, the late Norman Brinker, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation was established.

Since its inception, Komen has “funded more than $920 million in research, more than $2 billion in medical care, community and provider education, and psychosocial support, serving millions in over 60 countries worldwide.”

In addition, millions of people and countless fundraising efforts including Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s Celebrating Women Luncheon program  and the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides of North Texas have risen to fuel the battle to rid the world of the disease.

Gigi Hill Lancaster*

Ruth Altshuler (File photo)

Linda Custard (File photo)

Gene Jones (File photo)

To commemorate the 35th anniversary of the founding of Susan G. Komen, Gigi Hill Lancaster, who lost her mother to breast cancer, is chairing the Susan G. Komen Anniversary Luncheon at Belo Mansion on Wednesday, September 27. Serving as honorary co-chairs are Ruth Altshuler, Linda Custard and Gene Jones.

Giuliana Rancic*

Unlike those days when they used to hold the annual Komen luncheon, where boxes of Kleenex abounded, this one will be an anniversary celebration “honoring those who – for decades – have helped Dallas-based Komen fund breast cancer research and programs that have saved millions on lives.” Emmy-winning TV personality/ entrepreneur/ breast cancer survivor Giuliana Rancic, who was just seven years old when “the promise” was made, will be the featured speaker.  

Since the luncheon is being held at Belo Mansion, seating will be limited, so book your place pronto.

Thank-you notes should be sent to Co-Presenters Bank of America, Highland Park Village/Al G. Hill Jr. and family, Lyda Hill and Alinda H. Wikert. 

* Photo provided by Susan G. Komen

 

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 8th Annual Steaks On The Lake

According to  8th Annual Steaks on the Lake Co-Chairs Polly and Mike Campbell, Susan and Evan Griffiths and Bev and Alan Vuckovich,

Polly Anderson, Bev Vuckovich and Susan Griffiths*

Imagine a crisp fall evening, a delicious steak dinner, live music by Downtown Fever, a wine and whiskey pull and an exciting auction. All landing on Friday, November 17, at the impressive Frontiers of Flight Museum. Imagine having this much fun while supporting Grant Halliburton Foundation as it works to promote better mental health for kids, teens and young adults.

We are honored to be serving as co-chairs of this wonderful event while raising money for a cause that has directly touched each of our families. We have experienced firsthand that helpless feeling of learning that your child is struggling with a mental illness. 

Grant Halliburton Foundation was established in 2006 in memory of Grant Halliburton, a Dallas teen who battled depression and bipolar disorder for several years before taking his own life at the age of 19. The foundation that bears his name exists to help prevent similar tragedies. Its mission is to strengthen the network of mental health resources for children, teens and young adults; promote better mental health; and help prevent suicide.  

According to The Centers for Disease Control, suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year-olds and the third leading cause of death among 10- to 14-year-olds.  Through Steaks on the Lake, and with your help, we hope to raise awareness and erase the stigma of adolescent mental illness.

For sponsorship opportunities, contact Grant Halliburton Foundation at 972.744.9790. Tickets available in September.  To learn more, visit granthalliburton.org.

* Photo provided by Grant Halliburton

 

Update: Daisy Mae Has Less Legs To Stand On, But More Love To Support Her

It’s amazing that Daisy Mae, the white Labrador pup, managed to pull herself out of the gangbuster collision on Tuesday, July 11, and survived in a nearby ravine for days without water and comfort. Thanks to Mutts and Mayhem, she was found, rescued and taken to a vet.

Posted by Mutts & Mayhem Animal Rescue on Wednesday, July 19, 2017

But after checking with canine orthopedic specialists and her loving owner Erica Cruz, Daisy’s back left leg had to amputated due to the devastation.

She is now on pain killers, recovering and looking forward to a reunion with her family.

Nigel

According to four-year-old Nigel (a three-legged Pyrenees/poodle), “We tripods really get along quite well. Why there are even websites dedicated to our  ‘tripawd’ situation. In some way we feel so sorry for you humans with only two legs. Daisy is young and has a loving family. In no time she’ll quickly adapt to her new way of getting around.

“By the way, can you fix me up on a date with Daisy when she’s up and about?”

While Daisy and Erica are still recovering from the shock of the accident and their physical damage, their being together will help the mending.

But there’s still the funding for Daisy’s medical treatment.  Mutts and Mayhem is still trying to help ease the financial challenges that Daisy’s facing. It’s simple. Just go to this page and right under the amount of donation, click “Animal(s) you would like to sponsor.” That’s where you write “Daisy Mae.”

If you can help show your appreciation with ca-ching, wonderful. If the money just ain’t available, just send good thoughts.

* Video courtesy of Mutts and Mayhem

JUST IN: Returning Aware President Venise Stuart Reveals The Grant Recipients And Board Members For 2017-2018

Venise Stuart (File photo)

Venise Stuart’s dance card is getting full. Not only is she chairing the 2018 Mad Hatter’s Tea for the Women’s Council of the Dallas Arboretum, she is once again going to serve as president for Aware .

Venise just revealed the following ten organizations have been named Aware grant recipients for 2017-2018:

  • Baylor Health Care System Foundation – Support for the salary of a Ph.D. Neuropsychology Intern for Baylor AT&T Memory Center.
  • Center for BrainHealth – Discovery Group – Support for the Discovery Group, a program designed to help individuals and families affected by Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias focus on preserving abilities and tapping strengths to promote meaningful engagement and slow the progression of the disease
  • Dallas Museum of Art – Memory Moments – Support for teaching honorariums, supplies, and staffing for Memory Moments, a program designed to provide participants with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias ways to engage in art that are revitalizing and gratifying.
  • Jewish Family Service – Support for the salary of a Clinical Social Worker to provide independent living services to adults with Alzheimer’s and related dementias and their families/caregivers.
  • Juliette Fowler Communities – Support for group and individual therapy sessions with a Certified Music Therapist for memory care residents, and to help purchase additional instruments and therapeutic tools.
  • NorthPark Presbyterian Church – Casa de Vida – Support the Casa de Vida program, which gives relief to families/caregivers by providing one-on-one care to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias at the church for programs involving art, music, games, and lunch one day per week from 9:30 until 1:30.
  • Texas Winds Musical Outreach – Support for two concerts by professional musicians in 87 nursing homes and adult daycare facilities that serve individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.
  • Presbyterian Communities & Services Foundation – Broad Strokes – Support for the Broad Strokes program at Grace Presbyterian Village that provides music and art therapy to residents with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.
  • The Senior Source – Senior Companions – Support for the Senior Companion Program matching volunteers with individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and their families needing assistance with meals, light housekeeping, and companionship.
  • UT Southwestern Medical Center – Support to advance Dr. Roger Rosenberg’s research and clinical trials on a DNA Vaccine to clear amyloid plaques in the brain to prevent or slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

The Myrna D. Schlegel Aware Scholarship awardees will be Baylor University’s Nora Drutz-Rogney and TCU’s Lindsay Ross.

Part of the grant funding is achieved from proceeds from the annual Aware Affair. This year’s event — Celebrate the Moments — will take place on Friday the 13th of April with a three-course dinner, silent and live auctions and dancing. Wondering where it’s gonna be held? And who’s chairing the event? Good questions! That information is coming in the weeks ahead.

Joining Venise on the 2017-2018 Aware board will be Carol Stabler, secretary; Sue John, treasurer; Stacey Angel, membership; Myrna Schlegel, Myrna D. Schlegel Aware Scholarship Fund and Janet Broyles, past president. 

JUST IN: Brunettes Roz Colombo And Nancy Gopez To Co-Chair 2018 St. Valentine’s Day Fashion Show And Luncheon

Roz Colombo (File photo)

Nancy Gopez (File photo)

Summer fundraising ain’t taking a break. Word just arrived that brunettes Roz Colombo and Nancy Gopez will be co-chairing the 2018 St. Valentine’s Day Fashion Show and Luncheon.

When ask about details for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of North Texas fundraisers, Nancy and Roz just smiled and said, “Be patient.” Ah, gee.

Don’t worry. MSC will keep digging for developments.

In the meantime, news has been buzzing about a new breakthrough therapy for advanced leukemia that has been approved by the FDA. Don’t just keep your fingers crossed. Get out those checkbooks!

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Each Moment Matters

David and Laurie Peacock*

According to 2017 Each Moment Matters Luncheon Co-Chairs Laurie and David Peacock,

When Laurie and I were asked to chair the 2017 Each Moment Matters Luncheon we had no idea how impacted we would be by the work that Faith Presbyterian Hospice does in the Dallas community. We have heard so many stories from people who wish they had done things differently when their parent or spouse passed away on hospice.  Faith Presbyterian Hospice is the hospice that changes the end-of-life experience for both patients and families. We are honored to be a part of this signature event which supports customized services and excellent hospice care, both at home and at the recently opened inpatient hospice center, the T. Boone Pickens Hospice and Palliative Care Center.

Marlee Matlin*

We invite you to join us at the Hilton Anatole on Friday, September 29, with Academy Award winning actress and activist, Marlee Matlin as our guest speaker. With an extensive list of Hollywood career achievements including the movie “Children of a Lesser God,” for which she received the Academy Award for Best Actress, Marlee is an advocate for children and those struggling against domestic abuse and addiction, as well as other humanitarian causes. Having lost her hearing at 18 months of age, Marlee never let her challenges dictate her future or deter her dreams.

In its eighth year, the Each Moment Matters Luncheon will once again honor 25 community leaders through the Each Moment Matters Award. The event raises awareness of hospice care and how to navigate tough end-of-life decisions. Funds raised at the luncheon ensure that Faith Presbyterian Hospice can continue to provide services to those needing care regardless of their ability to pay.

Each Moment Matters*

Thanks to the following underwriters, the cost of this year’s event is fully covered allowing sponsorships and donations to go 100% to the Faith Presbyterian Hospice Caring Fund and the patients it serves: Cathy and William Davis, The Don W. Hodges Family, The Billie and Gillis Thomas Foundation, Business Jet Center, Messick Peacock and Associates, Knightvest Management LLC, Marcia and Noe Hinojosa and Margie and Ray Francis.

Table sponsorships start at $1,750 and individual tickets are available for $200.  To purchase a sponsorship or to find out more, please visit www.eachmomentmatters.org.

The 2017 Each Moment Matters Honorees: Arcilia C. Acosta, Stefanie and Steven Ailey, Yasmin Zarolia Bhatia, Thomas CampbellLisa Harper Clark MD, Joy Cruse, Mrs. David Curtis, Alison Doherty, Jane Benedict  Echols, Lisa Englander, Terry N. Ford, Tricia M. George, John Killian, Sandy Massie, Trish Matthews, D.Min., Carlin McDonald Morris, Scott Murray, “Smokey” John Reaves, George R. Schrader, Susan E. Stephens, Andy Kaye Walsh, Stephanie Ward, Pierre Michaela “Mickie” Watson and Janita Hemphill Wells.

* Graphic and photo provided by the Dallas Arboretum