MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Center For BrainHealth’s Legacy Award Dinner

If anyone mistakes the Center for BrainHealth types as strictly cerebral types, who sit around and use four syllable words, they definitely need to rethink that train of thought.

Need proof? Well, Brook Hollow was filled to the max with North Texas’ extreme boldfacers for the Legacy Award Dinner on Tuesday, November 14.

Debbie Francis, Laura Bush, Margaret McDermott, Deedie Rose and Caren Prothro

And what else would one expect when the co-chairs were Caren Prothro and Deedie Rose and the  honoree was that wheeling wonder Margaret McDermott? The lady-in-white, who is headed for her second century of philanthropy and wisdom, was the belle of the ball and joined other Legacy Awardees like Debbie Francis, James Huffines, Dee Wyly and Jane and Bud Smith plus a former first lady.

Patty and James Huffines

Dee Wyly

While the post is being prepared, check out the pictures at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Jennifer and Keith Cerny and Nikki and Crayton Webb

BTW, this was The Dallas Opera GM/CEO Keith Cerny’s social swan song and he didn’t let on that a move to Calgary was in his future. Shoot!

JUST IN: Golden Globe’s Nominee “This Is Us” Chrissy Metz To Be Keynote Speaker At The Elisa Project’s Life Lessons Lunch On February 28

The Golden Globe nominees were revealed Monday and Chrissy Metz is once again nominated for her role as Kate Pearson on NBC’s “This Is Us.” But her success and fame didn’t come overnight or easily. Chrissy’s life story is one that screenwriters dream of. Sure, she went through the trials and tribulations that many actresses face like being out of work, surviving thanks to friends and family, watching roles won by others and learning to accept rejection.

Chrissy Metz*

But Chrissy dealing with a literally “bigger” issue — her weight. Admitting that she was born chubby, she was just 11 when she went to Weight Watchers. Her weight jumped up and down the scales at one point losing 50 pounds only to “gain back 100 pounds due to depression and ‘eating my feelings.’”

Then the moment came when all the stars were in alignment and she landed the role of Kate, whose storyline was so akin to Chrissy’s. But even more than the role, Chrissy’s popularity has been due to her being so open about her dealing with her weight issues.

For that reason, The Elisa Project organizers are thrilled that they have just gotten word that Chrissy will be at the 13th Annual Life Lessons Luncheon on Wednesday, February 28, at Brook Hollow Golf Club for a conversation with Kimberly Schlegel Whitman.

Kimberly Schlegel Whitman (File photo)

Kim Bannister (File photo)

According to Luncheon Chair Kim Bannister, “As an organization dedicated to the development of healthy children and adolescents by raising awareness of body image and self-esteem issues and the prevention of life-threatening eating disorders, we know Chrissy will truly captivate attendees as she shares her own inspirational stories of courage and self-acceptance. This year’s luncheon is not to be missed!”

Honorary co-chairs will be Sandra Estess and Elizabeth Estess Hughes.

Starting at $2,000, tables are available for purchase now. If space permits, individual tickets will go on sale in early February. Suggestion: Gather up pals and get a table locked down now. Don’t depend on those individual spots coming available.

* Photo provided by The Elisa Project

MySweetWishList: Callier Center For Communication Disorders

According to Callier Center for Communication Disorders Executive Director Dr. Tom Campbell,

Tom Campbell*

“You probably know the song, ‘All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth.’ Please bear with me for a refresher of the chorus:

‘All I want for Christmas is my two front teeth
‘My two front teeth
‘See my two front teeth
‘Gee, if I could only have my two front teeth
‘Then I could wish you, “Merry Christmas’

“As I was brushing my teeth this morning, I wondered, what if the lyric was ‘All I want for Christmas is the ability to hear and speak.’ It doesn’t have the same ring to it as the song, but I know that children who are deaf or hard of hearing feel this way.

“This holiday season, most of us will be able to hear and even sing Christmas carols and holiday songs. We will be able to hear and speak with family members and friends, as we gather at holiday parties. But not everyone is able to hear and speak, communicate with their loved ones, hear music and sing.

“To complicate matters, many insurance plans, even Medicaid, only partially cover the cost of audiology and speech-language services. Thus, many families cannot afford the clinical care necessary to treat a child who is deaf or hard of hearing. These families seek a place that will help them, but unfortunately many clinics across North Texas have stopped seeing patients with Medicaid. Where do these children go? The Callier Center.

“I am proud that the Callier Center has chosen differently. We are committed to transforming the lives of all patients regardless of their income level or insurance coverage. It is a privilege to serve those who are less fortunate, but we cannot do it without you.

“When you give to the Callier Center, you open the door for a family in need. We provide the expertise of audiologists and speech-language pathologists, leading-edge technology, research and care.

“The ability to hear and speak should be a given, but that is not always the case. You have the power to ensure that a family’s limited finances do not become a barrier to care. Will you open the door for someone in need today? Will you grant a child’s wish to hear and speak?

“Please give to the Callier Center for Communication Disorders.”

-By Dr. Tom Campbell, Callier Center for Communication Disorder executive director

* Photo provided by Callier Center for Communication Disorder

MySweetWishList: Christmas In The Park

According to Christmas In The Park Volunteer Nita Clark,

“My wish is to help the SM Wright Foundation achieve its goal of securing 15,000 toys, one for each child attending this year’s Christmas in the Park event on Saturday, December 16! We are closing in, but we can always use your donations:  http://www.smwrightfoundation.org/content/donate-today/ .

Nita and Clark Cullum*

“Christmas in the Park is an annual event serving tens of thousands of residents of Fair Park and South Dallas – an area of Dallas with very high unemployment and scarce infrastructure and support. Christmas in the Park has grown beyond giving a toy or a bike to each child, but now provides winter coats, mattresses for kids who have no bed, plus books, a job fair, a college fair, hot meals, groceries, clothing, bus passes, gift cards for Walmart and help with utilities payments. 

“The Rev. SM Wright II pulls this off every year through the help from volunteers, members of the South Dallas community and corporations and donors from the greater Dallas community. Please help by supporting the toy drive.  You can also help by volunteering at the event!  Just email [email protected] to register. Like any great Christmas party, it’s sometimes chaotic, but always fun!

“The Christmas in the Park event is the best opportunity of the year for the SM Wright Foundation to reach families in the Fair Park area for the first time. Once the Foundation makes contact with a family, it can bring the adults into the computer skills training program, and kids into the South Dallas Top of the Class Community Tutoring Center. The Foundation helps people throughout the year with various immediate needs- from food at the Operation Hope Food Center, to clothes to help with rising electric bills. Again this year, there is a college expo with a dozen representatives from area colleges present, a job fair, hot meal, gift cards and bus passes. Please join us in participating in this joyous and meaningful holiday event! Christmas in the Park happens on Saturday, December 16, at the Automobile Building in Fair Park.”

-Nita Clark, Christmas In The Park volunteer

* Photo credit: Dana Driensky

Star 102.1 Personalities To Broadcast “Miracle Day Radiothon” Friday From Children’s Medical Center Dallas From 6 a.m. To 7 p.m.

Lacey Parker and Renee Parker (File photo)

Friday is going to be a bit warmer, but there’s still going to be a holiday chill in the air. That translates into the taste of hot chocolate at the desk and the aroma of homemade bread baking away. But what would be the ideal sound to go with all these senses of the holidays?

It’s “Miracle Day Radiothon”! Presented by Neighborhood Credit Union, iHeartRadio  Star 102.1’s Leigh Ann, Amanda Flores and Rick O’Bryan will be broadcasting from Children’s Medical Center Dallas. From 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., there will be patients like Kristin Alcaraz, Shantisa Anderson, Julissa Garcia, Sadie Granberry, Emmy Kaighan, Maddox Kindiger, Katie Kramer, Braden McCollum, Jacob Mowl, Samantha Raack, Makenna Rodolph, Sim Scott, Ace Shelton and Miguel Soto and their families telling memorable stories about their relationship with Children’s.

Tom Thumb’s Connie Yates (File photo)

In addition to reminding listeners of the true meaning of the holidays, the hope is that listeners will reach in their pockets to support program at Children’s Health, in partnership with Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) Hospitals. Donations can be made online or by calling 800.800.7277.

Factoid: Last year the Children’s Health system provided care for more than “278,000 unique patients at its hospitals, specialty centers and pediatric group practices. It is the second-busiest pediatric health system in the nation in terms of admissions and pediatric emergency department visits.”

Joining the effort to provide health care for children will sponsors Albertsons/Tom Thumb, Granite, AT and T, Cisco and The Residences at Rough Creek Lodge.

Caroline Kraddick Shares Her Personal Journey Into Philanthropy At Morgan Stanley Annual Women’s Luncheon

Since Kidd Kraddick‘s death in 2013, his daughter Caroline Kraddick has carried on his legacy of helping children with life-threatening and altering challenges. On Thursday, November 9, Caroline shared her journey at the Morgan Stanley Annual Women’s Luncheon. Here’s a report from the field:

On Thursday, November 9, about 50 of Dallas’ most philanthropic women attended an intimate luncheon hosted by Morgan Stanley at Royal Oaks Country Club in Dallas. The women gathered together to hear how Caroline Kraddick is growing out of the shadow of her father and into her own.  As “Chief Happiness Officer” of Kidd’s Kids, she is determined to grow the family legacy of hope and happiness which her Dad, the late Kidd Kraddick started over 25 years ago. 

Melanie Schnoll Begun, Caroline Kraddick, Christine Ashmore and Sallie Behnke*

Melanie Schnoll Begun, head of Stanley Morgan’s Philanthropic Management, interviewed Caroline over lunch on a number of topics including Caroline’s new efforts to create more awareness and raise more funding to expand Kidd’s Kids programming, including her signature Teen Trip that was added to the list of offerings this year.

Caroline is the original, “Kidd’s Kid.” Her parents were told she was likely to be born with disabilities, so her dad made a deal with God! She was born healthy, and the mission of Kidd’s Kids to provide hope and happiness by creating beautiful memories for families of children with life-altering or life-threatening conditions was born with her.

Caroline grew up around the Kidd’s Kids families and when her dad, passed away unexpectedly in 2013, she began a very personal journey. After a year of mourning, making music and soul searching, Caroline found her calling and returned to Dallas as the driving force and voice of the foundation, Caroline wants to spread the word about Kidd’s Kids to the world.

As the centerpiece of the foundation, Kidd’s Kids provides an all-expense-paid trip for approximately 50 children and their families to Walt Disney World® in Florida each year. For many families that have children with life-threatening and life-altering conditions, this becomes the trip of their lifetime.

The lively discussion continued with Caroline sharing her personal goals and using her voice (literally with her passion for singing!) for the future growth. Caroline hopes with more donations in the future, she can increase the number of families to take to Disney World. She also started a signature Teen Trip to Florida earlier this year by partnering with Give Kids the World; teens battling life-altering conditions continue to need hope and happiness too! Overall, Caroline’s stories inspired the room full of women who are ready to make a bigger impact in our philanthropic community.

Courtenay DeHoff and Amy Vanderoef*

Jo-Ann Saunders and Celia Saunders*

Among the luncheon crowd were Kellie Rasberry, Amy Vanderoef, Jo-Ann Saunders, Celia Saunders, Christine Ashmore, Sallie Behnke, Jocelyn White, Courtenay DeHoff, Alex Cohen and Carol Charette.

Ways to help this holiday season: Text KIDD to 52000 anytime to donate $10.

Buy your tickets to Enchant Christmas https://enchantchristmas.com enter Promo Code KIDD in the upper right hand box on the ticket purchase page for a portion of ticket and skate rental proceeds to support Kidd’s Kids.

To get involved and get or more information on how to support Kidd’s Kids, please go to www.kiddskids.com

* Photo provided by Morgan Stanley

Dallas Historical Society’s Awards For Excellence In Community Services Recipients Displayed Insight And Graciousness In Accepting Their Honors

While the Dallas Historical Society‘s 2017 Awards for Excellence in Community Services crowds gathered outside the Fairmont’s International Ballroom, the VIPs and 2017 Awardees attended a private reception in the Venetian Room on Thursday, November 9. For some it was a great opportunity for people whose paths had never crossed to meet up.

Lindalyn Adams, Mary McDermott Cook and David Brown

Diane Bumpas and Bill Helmbrecht

Caro Stalcup

Joan Walne, Mary Suhm and Laurie Evans

For instance, historical preservationist Lindalyn Adams was almost giddy meeting former Police Chief David Brown. Speaking of David, he reported that due to his ABC contract, he was splitting his time between Dallas and New York City… Across the way, Laurie Evans was doing the swivel head looking for her husband Dr. Phil Evans to arrive. She knew he would be there, but when? … Already on the scene were past Award recipients Marnie and Kern Wildenthal, who were there to celebrate Kern’s brother Hobson Wildenthal’s being recognized for his work in education…. Patricia Meadows reported that the family home in the State Thomas neighborhood was on the market… and others like Joan and Alan Walne, Mary McDermott Cook, Louise Caldwell, Diane Bumpas, Caro Stalcup, Mary Suhm, Creative Arts Awardee Carolyn Brown, Arts Leadership Awardees Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller and Sports Leadership Awardee Tony Dorsett with his wife Janet Dorsett.

Louise Caldwell

Marnie and Kern Wildenthal and Mary McDermott Cook

Janet and Tony Dorsett

Phil Evans

 

Just moments before the chimes called the group to the luncheon, Laurie was relieved to see her husband arrive with a big smile. Seems he had gotten an early Christmas gift — a million-dollar grant —from an “anonymous” donor. That’s a pretty darn good excuse for a delayed arrival.

The ballroom was filled to the max, as people like Jill Bernstein, Sandi Chapman, Kimber Hartmann, Gail Thomas and Lee Cullum took their seats. At 11:50 a.m., Master of Ceremonies Stewart Thomas called the group to order. Following an invocation by St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church Rev. Chris Girata, Stewart introduced Luncheon Co-Chairs Carol Montgomery and Kaysie Montgomery, who welcomed the group. They were followed by Dallas Historical Society Chair Bill Helmbrecht, who officially thanked all for attending and supporting the society.

Kaysie Montgomery and Carol Montgomery

All of this was done within six minutes! Promptly at high noon, Stewart reported that the program would continue in a few minutes and guests should settle back for lunch. Missing in action was table host Bobby Lyle, who was under the weather, but his table was filled with Adam McGill, Stan Levenson and Robert Prejean… Arriving just after luncheon was underway was Shirley Miller.

Adam McGill, Stan Levenson and Robert Prejean

At 12:25 p.m. Stewart was back at the podium and invited the award recipients to take their places in chairs on the stage.

Some of the highlights from the acceptance speeches were:

Carolyn Brown and Hobson Wildenthal

  • Hobson Wildenthal for Education — The University of Texas at Dallas Executive VP recalled how 50 years ago TI was created and the UTD resulted. 157 National Merit Scholars were in this year’s freshman class and it was designated as the Best U.S. College less than 50 years old. He finished saying, “Margaret McDermott is the queen of Dallas.”
  • Steve Pounders for Health/Science — The internist told how in 1981 he was just starting his care and discovered a disease that was affecting young men that would late become known as AIDs. It would become his life’s calling resulting in his serving as the primary physician for men in the Dallas Buyers Club. He thanked Veletta Lill, Resource Center’s Cece Cox and his spouse James O’Reilly.
  • Willis Winters for History — The Dallas Park and Recreation Department Director gave thanks for the recent passage of the bond: “One of the first projects will be the restoration of the Hall of State.”
  • Jorge Baldor for Philanthropy — The Cuban-born businessman acknowledged that 800,000 have been the recipients of DACA and encouraged audience members to support the Dream Act. He went on to thank the event and kitchen staffs and finished by reporting that several hundred students are living under bridges and still going to school.

Then the most poignant moment came unexpectedly. It was when former Dallas Cowboy Tony Dorsett accepted his award for sports. He admitted that he was a little taken aback by the people, and went on to recognize the late Cowboys Coach Tom Landry, who made Tony understand that things were going to be tougher in the NFL. Landry held Tony back and it taught the young football player patience.  Tony went on, saying, “I was always told that I was too small, time and time again.” Through effort and determination, he was able to play in the NFL for 13 years.  

Looking at the other recipients seated on stage, he went on to saying “These are fantastic and incredible people up here.”

He thanked his wife Janet saying, “What I’m going through is tough, and she puts up with me. It can be really difficult and she understands that that’s not the real me. This is tough.”

Having gone beyond his two-minute limit, Janet was seen quietly approaching the side of the stage. Tony heard her say, “Tony,” and he took note and sat down.

Moments later David Brown took his place at the podium to accept the Jubilee History Maker Award. He could have easily sucked the air out of the room for his leadership for the July 7 tragedy. Instead, David rallied the audience to give Tony another round of appreciation. The applause was deafening for both Tony and David’s act of graciousness.

David went to tell how his father hadn’t wanted him to be “a cop.” But on the day when he was made a lieutenant at the Hall of State, he had what would be the last conversation with his father, who said “You were right in your choice.”

Then David went further back in his history, telling how in fourth grade, he had played Captain George Ludwig von Trapp in the “Sound of Music.” The students had to do more than learn their roles. They had to research the backstory of the musical. Today he had become nostalgic when seeing the white flowers on the tables and hearing the musician play “Edelweiss” — the last song Richard Rodgers wrote with Oscar Hammerstein.

Tying it all together, he said, “Remember who we are, what we stand for, how we should treat each other.” Then he voiced disappointment at the lack of participation in the recent election.

At 1:14 p.m., Bill Helmbrecht returned to the stage and invited all to take part in the annual A.C. Greene Toast.

For more pictures of the day, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

A Passing: Eli

Eli (File photo)

Eli worked with more patients than most doctors. You might say he was a general practitioner since his skills were limitless.  And his bedside manner was better than even Marcus Welby’s.

For a decade, Eli was the Numero Uno member of the Baylor Animal Assisted Therapy program. From his birth on March 13, 2007, there was something special about the Golden Retriever. Sure, he was like any dog if a tennis ball caught his eye. But once he arrived at any of the Baylor campuses in North Texas wearing his ID badge and bandanna, he transformed into a care provider.

By an act of the fates, Eli was able to pursue his calling with his partner Linda Marler, who was in charge of the Baylor program. Partner? Yes. Anyone could see that in Eli’s and Linda’s relationship, there was no “owner.” They were partners.

For years, Linda and Eli would daily go to “their” office on the first floor of Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation and set up schedules and work with all types of patients. In some cases, it was just to provide some comfort for a patient who missed their own dog. For others, it was helping a young person trying to regain the use of their hands after a motorcycle accident. And for still others, it was quietly putting his head in someone’s lap when they were having a bad day.

Linda Marler and Eli (File photo)

However, it was more than the patients who got the Eli treatment. Baylor staff members would greet them as they walked through the halls.  Their little office became the “must-stop-by” spot for anyone working in the building. It was never surprising to see a patient in a wheelchair roll up to the door to see how Eli was doing. The Golden Retriever greeted each visitor with a wagging tail and a smile. Yes, Eli did smile.

Alas, poor Eli had to put up with some of Linda’s silliness. She would balance everything from treats to balls on his nose to show how obedient he was. Everyone from children to the most highly educated specialist would look in amazement as he held his nose just the right way until Linda gave him the signal to release.

Eli in the center with Baylor Animal Assisted Therapy testing team (File photo)

And, of course, Eli became the rock star of the Animal Assisted Therapy program. The temperament testing team considered Eli not to be a dog, but rather one of the testers. When new dogs would be tested for the program that was considered one of the toughest, Eli would quietly lie nearby until Linda needed him.

Eli (File photo)

As the years passed, Eli found himself training a new puppy in the Marler household. The pup’s name was Micah and, like Eli, he was a Golden Retriever. Only Micah was a bit of a cut-up. As a youngster, he got loose and was the victim of a hit-and-run. Luckily, Micah pulled through, but it is believed that Eli took him aside and told him to get his act together … which he did.

In recent years, Eli’s muzzle was turning white and he was slowing down a bit. After all, that’s why he had been training Micah to take over some of his duties. But Eli was still showing up for work with Linda and taking care of their patients and staff.

Just this past Sunday, an email was sent by Linda, “Went to ER today. Eli has hemangiosarcoma … We brought him home with us…..giving him extra love and attention. He is not eating….. it is only a matter of time.”

That time came last night, when Linda watched her partner cross the rainbow bridge.

JUST IN: KidneyTexas Distributes $144,639 To Six Organizations

KidneyTexas President Andrea Alcorn looked relieved Tuesday night at Tootsies. She revealed that thanks to the KidneyTexas committee efforts especially the Runway Report Luncheon chaired by Christine Martin and Susan Russell, they had met their goal — $144,639.

Andrea Alcorn, Susan Russell, Dustin Holcomb and McKamy Tiner Looney

Then she played Santa doling out the following checks:

  • Baylor Health Care System Foundation: $30,000 for five year study of kidney transplants;
  • Camp Reynal: $19,500;
  • Children’s Medical Center Foundation: $20,500 for hemodialysis and blood pressure machines;
  • Parkland Foundation: $30,500 for kidney dialysis Unit;
  • Texas Health Resources Foundation: $14,214 for hemodialysis machine; and
  • UT Southwestern Medical Center: $29,925 for kidney related research.

Cattle Baron’s Ball Newbies Debuted With Cowgirl Chapeaus And Smiles

Remember those days when pledge ship was a recipe of “What have I gotten myself into” with “Gee, I made it!” Those memories may have kicked into play for the newest Cattle Baron’s Ball members on Tuesday, November 7, at the ZaZa Art House and Social Gallery.

While oldtimers like past CBB Chairs Sunie Solomon and Andrea Weber and loyal committee types like Dawn Greiner, Callan Harrison and Katie Layton were right at home, the new girls on the fundraising organization looked a bit wary. There were rows of chairs with cowboy hats set up by CBB New Member Liaison Marjon Henderson. What was expected of them?

Frosh member Kristen Gibbins didn’t hold back. “She got me into this,” said Kristen as she pointed to longtime pal Andrea Nayfa.

Jonika Nix and Katy Bock

Kristen Gibbins and Andrea Nayfa

But once 2018 Co-Chairs Katy Bock and Jonika Nix called the newbies together, the 15 newest members (Jennifer Burns, Alexine Cryer, Catherine Flagg, Kristen Gibbins, Suzi LeBeau, Kelley Ledford, Rachel Osburn, Melissa Pastora, Lauren Phillips, Jill Ritchey, Brittany Smalley, Tara Versfelt, Mackenzie Wallace and Claudia Williams) sans Lisa Hewitt discovered they weren’t going to play “Truth or Dare.” Instead it was a couple of photos — one without the hats and one with — and a brief orientation by 2018 leaders.

From the left: (standing) Jill Ritchey, Alexine Cryer, Melissa Pastora, Claudia Williams, Brittany Smalley, Mackenzie Wallace, Kelley Ledford, Kristen Gibbins, Suzi LeBeau and Lauren Phillips; (seated) Rachel Osburn, Tara Versfelt, Jonika Nix, Katy Bock, Catherine Flagg and Jennifer Burns

From the left: (standing) Jill Ritchey, Alexine Cryer, Melissa Pastora, Claudia Williams, Brittany Smalley, Mackenzie Wallace, Kelley Ledford, Kristen Gibbins, Suzi LeBeau and Lauren Phillips; (seated) Rachel Osburn, Tara Versfelt, Jonika Nix, Katy Bock, Catherine Flagg and Jennifer Burns

Then it was back to socializing and the march to raise funds for cancer research and treatments.

Fujitsu Network Communications Inc. Receives Methodist Richardson Medical Center Foundation’s Legacy Award At Yellow And Black Gala

It was as if Saturday, November 4, had become the perfect storm of fundraising in North Texas with Jubilee Park And Community Center celebrating its 20th birthday at the Omni Dallas, the animal lovers partying is up at Zoo To Do at the Dallas Zoo, the Dallas Summer Musicals Gala on stage at Fair Park’s Music Hall and Art for Advocacy at General Datatech. But north of the Dallas CBD, the black-tie set was raising fun and funds for Methodist Richardson Medical Center Foundation at its annual Yellow and Black Tie Gala. Here’s a report from the field:

Richardson luminaries lit up the night on Saturday, November 4, at Renaissance Dallas Richardson Hotel for the Methodist Richardson Medical Center Foundation’s Yellow and Black Tie Gala. 

Parin and Stuti Makadia, Sharon Snayd and Randy Montgomery*

This annual event is the crown jewel of Richardson and dazzled more than 500 guests that support the hospital in Richardson. Guests like Ann and Charles Eisemann, Stuti and Parin Makadia, Sharon Snayd, Randy Montgomery, Judy and Max Martin, Anne and Bernie DiFiore and Stephen Mansfield were captivated by a riveting story about a patient who died for virtually 55 minutes and was brought back to life because of the type of equipment that the Foundation helps to fund and the expert physicians at the hospital. The evening also included a live auction that was a source of fun and funding for the Foundation. 

Charles and Ann Eisemann*

Judy and Max Martin

Bernie and Anne DiFiore*

Clay and Shelly Harrison*

Each year, the Foundation also gave the Legacy Award to a person or organization that has been one of its ardent supporters. Fujitsu Network Communications Inc. received this year’s honor with its president and CEO, Mikito Kiname, graciously accepted the honor from Methodist Richardson Medical Center President Ken Hutchenrider and Methodist Richard Medical Center Foundation Chair Colleen Halbert commending the Foundation on its mission and important work in the community. 

Mikito Kiname, Ken Hutchenrider and Colleen Halbert*

The evening was capped off with a casino afterparty, where guests chanced their luck and danced late into the evening.

* Photo credit: Kristina Bowman

2017 MySweetWishList Starts Monday!

MySweetCharity

After recovering from the Cowboy loss and using Tums as Thanksgiving supper chasers, it’s time to start marching into the official holiday season. In addition to pulling out the holidays decorations from the attic, heading to Sandone for the tree and sending greeting cards, the annual MySweetWishList series will kick into place Monday.

It’s a marvelous opportunity to help those whose needs are great. They’re not wishing for an XPhone or a new Mercedes. Rather, they are parents who are going to have to explain to their kids that Santa is going to have to take a pass this year. It’s the homeless and elderly, whose feast is going to be meager at best. It’s animals that will have concrete floors or wired cages to sleep in without a blanket or toy.

So, if you have room on your holiday shopping list, consider adding one or two more from those with wishes. You’ll not only make others happy, your accountant will be positively giddy about the deduction around April 15.

And even if your wallet is emptied out already, consider just reading the wishes. You may just learn about services, organizations and people that make this community great.

On the other hand, if you are in need, you just might find a resource to help you through the days ahead.  

Housing Crisis Center’s Colors Of Courage 2017 Patriot Party Assists Homeless Vets Affected By The ‘Hidden Wounds Of War’

It’s a disturbing fact, but Dallas is home to more than 1,000 homeless military veterans—and the number keeps rising. Every night, the Housing Crisis Center provides housing and support services to more than 100 vets and their families. 

So supporting these vets, and helping save them from a life of poverty and homelessness, was the purpose of the center’s Colors of Courage 2017 Patriot Party event Friday, November 3, at Dallas’ George W. Bush Institute.

Laura Moon

Denny and Connie Carreker

Leslie Ann Crozier

Dennis Moon, Katherine Wynne and Ken Hersh

Co-chaired by Laura and Dennis Moon, with Connie and Denny Carreker serving as honorary chairs, the fundraiser got started with a reception and silent auction in the institute’s Cross Hall.  There, guests including Wendy and Boyd Messmann, Katherine Wynne, Sunie and Steve Solomon, Leslie Ann Crozier, Lisa and Clay Cooley, and Mary Martha and John Pickens were serenaded by a guitar-strumming musician singing Beatles and Eagles songs.

Sunie and Steve Solomon

John and Mary Martha Pickens

Then everyone repaired to the institute’s auditorium, where they were formally welcomed to the evening’s festivities by Edward Berbarie, board chairman of the Housing Crisis Center. Soon enough Edward gave way to Bush Center President and CEO Ken Hersh, who proceeded to conduct an onstage Q&A with the evening’s star attraction, retired Army Gen. Peter Chiarelli.

Chiarelli, the Army’s 32nd Vice Chief of Staff, was responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Army and its 1.1 million active and reserve soldiers, and at one time commanded all forces in Iraq. The retired four-star general told Hersh it was then that he first observed the “hidden wounds of war” in soldiers, including the “interconnected problems” of depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and post-traumatic stress.

Peter Chiarelli

“We’ve had these problems since war began,” Chiarelli said, “but we’re just now recognizing them.”

Chiarelli is now chief executive officer of an independent nonprofit called ONE MIND, he told Hersh. The group advocates on behalf of those affected by brain disease and injury via public-private partnerships between healthcare providers, researchers, academics, and the healthcare industry.

For example, Chiarelli said, ONE MIND is working with Abbott Laboratories, which is “developing a chip and a hand-held blood analyzer that can help tell if a person has been concussed.” He added, “We want to get drug companies involved in creating targeted drugs for these diseases … and really do something to help these veterans.”

What keeps you up at night? Hersh asked Chiarelli at one point. He replied: “Those young Americans who have suffered.”

Wendy and Boyd Messmann, Sherri Ansley and Lisa Cooley

Once the talk concluded, Sherri Ansley, executive director of the Housing Crisis Center, took to the podium and announced, “Now it’s time to have a party!” With that she invited everyone into the institute’s Hall of State, where there would be dinner, dancing, and a live auction featuring artwork, out-of-state trips, and a dinner for eight prepared by Kent Rathbun.

2017 Callier Cares Luncheon Chair Emilynn Wilson Is Presented With The Former Chair Bracelet

The makeup from Halloween’s haunting had hardly been scrubbed off than news of 2017’s final fundraising push as underway. Over at the Dallas Country Club Founder’s Room, the Callier Center’s Callier Care Luncheon leadership was doing double duty at noon on Wednesday, November 1.

Sissy Cullum, Betsy Cullum and Libby Hunt

Launched last year, the past luncheon chairs come together to present the recent chair with a bracelet. This year past luncheon chairs Libby Hunt (2012),  Barbara Stuart (2013), Betsy Cullum and Sissy Cullum (2014) and  Angie Kadesky (2016), Callier Center Foundation Chair John Stuart and Callier Center for Communications Disorders Dr. Tom Campbell and Jennifer Fowler were on hand to present 2017 Callier Cares Luncheon Chair Emilynn Wilson with the Tiffany sack containing her new trinket.

Angie Kadesky and John and Barbara Stuart

The gathering was also the official handing over of the baton to 2018 Callier Cares Luncheon Chair Beth Thoele fresh from her chairing the Equest Luncheon and Style Show in October.

Emilynn Wilson, Tom Campbell and Beth Thoele

Joining Beth for the Callier Center for Communications Disorders fundraiser on Tuesday, April 17, at the Dallas Country Club will be Honorary Co-Chairs Joyce and Larry Lacerte. Receiving the Ruth and Ken Altshuler Callier Care Award will be The Meadows Foundation.

As for Emilynn, she’s still recovering from the record-breaker fundraiser and a nasty cough, as well as preparing to chair The Wilkinson Center’s Can Do Luncheon on Monday, May 7, at Dallas Country Club.

The Senior Source Honored 2017 Spirit Of Generations Awardees Diane And John Scovell With Some Tricks And Treats

Hyatt Regency Dallas guests probably thought that Halloween was getting an early start on Tuesday, October 31. Passing them by were a blonde in black attire topped off with a black cowboy hat and red cape, a person in oversized cowboy costume, cheerleaders and munchkins in red T-shirts reading 2027 Panthers.

Actually, all these characters were on site as part of The Senior Source’s Spirit of Generations Luncheon honoring longtime Texas Tech loyalists Diane and John Scovell, as well as present the 2017 Molly H. Bogen Service Award to Lori Daniels.

Fred and Jan Hegi

Bob White

Carolyn Miller

As the Landmark Circle filled to capacity for the VIP reception with Gail and Gerald Turner, 2016 Spirit Awardees Jan and Fred Hegi, 2011 Spirit Awardee Carolyn Miller, 2010 Spirit Awardees Marnie and Kern Wildenthal, Sarah and Alan Losinger, Caren Kline, Kristen and Jim Hinton, Tucker Enthoven with her mom Julie Ford, John and Betty Crawford, Debbie Oates, Brent Christopher, Robin Robinson and Margo Goodwin, The Senior Source President/CEO Cortney Nicolato and Bank of Texas Dallas Market Executive Bob White welcomed the crowd.

Diane Scovell

One or two of the group admitted that they had headed to the Anatole, where the event had been held in the past. But since John had built the Hyatt along with the world-renowned tower, it was only right to honor him in his hotel.

One guest was huffing as she arrived after parking her car in the satellite parking lot. She admitted that the lunch was just the second time that she had been to the Hyatt and climbing the hill in high heels for John was a labor of love. The next time she was gonna valet.

Alan White and John Scovell

Mary Montgomery and Kristi Hoyl

At 11:30 the Landmark Ballroom was filling with longtime friends of the Scovells like Texas Tech buddy Alan White was tableside with Pat SchenkelKristi Hoyl and Mary Montgomery spied each other across the way. They were both in similar dresses… Alan Walne was still sporting a sling due to surgery…Former Senior Source President/CEO Molly Bogen arrived to hugs from Lindalyn Adams …’nother former Senior Sourcer Betty Houser reported that after a year off for “temporary retirement,” she was considering a return to the nonprofit sector… and Pat McCallum, Barbara Stuart, County Commissioner Dr. Elba Garcia, District Attorney Faith Johnson and Brad Cheves.

Pete Schenkel, Brad Cheves and Alan Walne

Betty Houser and Stephanie Russell

Just past noon Senior Source Board Chair John Taylor III got things started by introducing Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church Senior Pastor Rev. Matthew Ruffiner, who gave the invocation, and Luncheon Chair Carol Lupton Huckin and Diamond Underwriter Baylor Scott And White Health CEO Jim Hinton addressed the crowd as lunch was served.

In presenting the Bogen Service Award with Molly to Lori, Cortney told how Lori had served in various capacities to help the elderly. Lori even created an underwear donation drive called “The Reverse Panty Raid” and a gift drive for the holidays. That first year, “ten seniors were adopted.” Last year 200 personalized gifts were delivered to clients.

Lori Daniels, Cortney Nicolato and Molly Bogen

Lori recalled how she had joined The Senior Source after seeing a notice in The Dallas Morning News for a volunteer opportunity. That was 20 years ago. Since that time, she has involved friends, family and especially her husband, Jim Daniels.

A video was shown detailing the countless programs that The Senior Source provides. Just last year they accommodated 33,000 “older adults.”

As the lights came up, a couple of white rocking chairs were now on the left side of the stage in front of a row of faux hedges with twinkling lights. In the back of the ballroom, cheerleaders and other characters waited.

Red Raider and Masked Rider

Following the video, Cortney asked that guests visit a senior and text donations. She then explained that while the fundraiser often took place around Thanksgiving, this year “We’re just trying to mess with you today and do it on Halloween.”

As Cortney left the stage and Diane and John took their places in the rocking chairs. A voice over the PA revealed how it was a Scovell tradition at Halloween that trick or treaters must do a trick before getting a treat. In keeping with that idea, it was announced that Stage Fright Events had been hired to screen the masses who seek their 15 minutes of fame “on the Scovells’ front porch.

John and Diane Scovell

The skit provided laughs as one of the screeners proved not to be the sharpest tack in the box saying that

  • John had met Diane when she was a traveling rodeo clown. No, Diane had been a rodeo queen in Brady. And they met in college — Texas Tech, of course.
  • John’s dad, Field Scovell, had been “Mr. Spandex Bowl.” No, Field had been Mr. Cotton Bowl.
  • John had built the Eiffel Tower. No, he had built Reunion Tower.
  • In college, Diane and John were named Mr. and Miss Texas A and …. No, they were named Mr. and Miss Texas Tech.

Preston Hollow Elementary School third graders

The first to tryout were future Hillcrest Panthers/third graders from Preston Hollow Elementary, who sang “Skin and Bones.” [Editor’s note: It was pretty darn adorable.]

Next up was the Reunion Tower Ball that texted via the big screen that it and the Scovells go back 39 years. For its trick, the revolving ball displayed a lit pumpkin.

Reunion Tower

Texas Tech cheerleaders

The final tryout on stage was the Texas Tech crew including the cheerleaders shouting “Two bits, four bits, six bits, a dollar. All for seniors  stand up and holler.” With that the Tech fight song played, Masked Rider and Raider Red arrived on stage and the guests stood.

With the Diane and John still rocking, Underwriting Chair John Crawford replaced the Stage Fright team and told how the Scovells had made a dynamic impact on Dallas education, business, health and environment by looking “to the future with a reverence for the past.” In the Scovell world, “Success is a team sport.”

John Crawford, Carol Huckin, John and Diane Scovell and John Taylor

John Taylor and Carol joined John Crawford in presenting the award to the Scovells.

After receiving the award, John Scovell retired to his chair and Diane admitted, “I want to shut the doors and get around to everybody…We’re appreciative and so very uncomfortable. It’s kinda not our style.” She asked everyone who had been involved with any of the Scovell projects for the betterment of Dallas. It seemed like all but a handful stood. At one point she told how their sons had been such troopers even when John coached them in soccer but knew nothing about the sport.

It was now time for John to address the group by defending his soccer skills. “My father told me early on. He said, ‘Son, if you can’t use your hands, it must be a communist sport.’ That was my introduction to soccer.” He then had Diane join him at the podium. Once again he recalled something his father had told him, “He had spent a lot of time at events like this and he said, ‘Son, if you’re to speak and have a nice audience, here’s what you tell them. You stand up to be seen. You speak up to be heard. You sit down to be appreciated.”

And from the audience’s response, the Scovells were truly appreciated.

For more photos of the day’s activities, head on over to MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Grovel Alert: Breakfast With Santa

Breakfast with Santa*

Thanks to Toyota, the Dallas Holiday Parade will commence on at 10 a.m. Saturday, December 2, in downtown Dallas. And what better way to kick off the celebration than to have breakfast with the man of the season — Santa Claus.

The Women’s Auxiliary of Children’s Medical Center Dallas have connections with North Pole types and have arranged for the ho-hoing whiskered fellow at the Adolphus at 8:30 a.m. for the 29th Annual Breakfast with Santa.

In addition to delicious breakfast just before the parade starts in front of the Adolphus, there will be face painting, balloon artists, clowns, magicians, character appearances and so much more. Sorry, but Rudolph won’t make it. Seems he has an early morning workout to prepare for his Christmas Eve romp.

So, before basting that turkey, gobble up some of the last remaining tickets for your kids and grandkids. Tickets are available here!

* Photo provided by Women's Auxiliary of Children's Medical Center Dallas

JUST IN: Emmy Award Winner/Former WFAA “PM Magazine’s” Leeza Gibbons Returns To Dallas As Go Red For Women Keynote Speaker

And the news keeps rocking and rolling in today. Go Red For Women Luncheon Co-Chairs Lisa Cooley and Janelle Walker have just announced Emmy Award winner Leeza Gibbons will be returning to familiar surroundings for the American Heart Association – Dallas fundraiser.  

Leeza Gibbons*

It was back in the late 1970s and early 1980s that Leeza appeared with Bill Ratliff on WFAA’s “PM Magazine,” before heading on to other programs like “Entertainment Tonight,” “Extra” and “Leeza.”

In addition to her television career, Leeza has made quite a reputation for herself regarding children’s causes and health issues. One of them being heart disease. She knows all too well that one can survive a heart attack. Her father Carlos “Pops” Gibbons was diagnosed with coronary heart disease. Not one to sit around and do nothing, Leeza insisted that her dad get a media alert system, Philips Lifeline. Three years later Carlos fell to the floor having a heart attack. Thanks to the device, an ambulance arrived in time.  

Leeza was so impressed with the lifesaving device, she became a spokesperson for it and an advocate for heart healthiness.

According to Leeza, “While heart disease doesn’t discriminate, we do know there is a need to make more women aware of their risk. Heart disease and stroke cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all the cancers combined. Go Red For Women is a movement I am happy to stand behind to help drive change through advocacy, research and education.”

On Friday, February 23, Leeza will be at the Omni to join 1,300 women and men to raise funds to battle heart disease.

Sponsorship opportunities are available by calling Liz Robinson at 214.441.4258.

* Photo provided by American Heart Association of Dallas

JUST IN: Pat McEvoy And Michal Powell To Co-Chair 2018 Celebrating Women Luncheon With Shelle Sills As Underwriting Chair

Last week it was announced that Pat McEvoy would chair the 2019 Crystal Charity Ball. While some might want to rest up before taking on the responsibility to raise millions of dollars for Dallas children’s nonprofits, Pat is not your typical gal.

Pat McEvoy (File photo)

Michal Powell (File photo)

Shelle Sills (File photo)

It was just announced that Pat and Michal Powell will co-chair Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s 2018 Celebrating Women Luncheon. Joining the team will be Shelle Sills, who will be in charge of underwriting duties.

Just last Thursday Michal chaired the Doing The Most Good Luncheon for The Salvation Army DFW Metroplex Command at the Anatole with Shelle as her arrangements chair.

As for plans about the breast cancer research and treatment fundraiser, the details are being finalized. Stay tuned.

JUST IN: 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon And Anne Stodghill Present A Whopping $4M For Cancer Research And Treatments

Less than a month ago, weather threatened to put a real damper on the year-long work of the Cattle Baron’s Ball committee led by Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill. But the CBBers stood their ground at Gilley’s on Saturday, October 21, and Mother Nature held back until the last guests partied on home. The fundraising was deemed a major party success.

Anne Stodghill and Sunie Solomon

Today at the CBB fall luncheon at Truluck’s, Anne and Sunie revealed the results of their team’s efforts. It was a whopping, holy mackerel $4M to support cancer research and treatments.

That’s not the gross, not the amount raised! It is the bottom-line net.

Now, 2018 CCB Co-Chairs Katy Bock and Jonika Nix pick up and carry on the fundraising for the 45-year-old organization. First on their must-do-list is the announcement of the 2018 theme. That is scheduled to happen after the holidays. Stay tuned.

Body Oak Cliff Founder Joel Pulis And Sheriff Lupe Valdez To Receive The Well Community’s First Founder’s Award At Recovery Live Benefit Concert

The Well Community is adding a new element to its annual Recovery Live Benefit Concert on Thursday, November 30, at The Kessler. In the past, the fundraiser to help adults dealing with severe mental illnesses has just a great time with great music.

Lupe Valdez (File photo)

But after four years, they decided to put some bells and whistles to the festivities. In addition to having WFAA’s Brett Shipp as emcee and Floramay Holliday and Over the River and The Rosemont Kings performing, they’ve added a silent auction and the Founder’s Award.

This first-time award will be presented to Body Oak Cliff Founder Joel Pulis and Sheriff Lupe Valdez.

According to The Well Community Executive Director Alice Zaccarello, “This award has been created to acknowledge those whose action have opened up new avenues of recovery and hope to individuals suffering from mental illnesses.”

Event sponsors include Good Space, Ged Dipprey Realtor, Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate, Bret and Karen Schuch, Steven and Dawn Camp, Roland Warnock, Hanes and Boone LLP, K and L Gates LLP, Beth and Wes Keyes, Jim Lake Advisors LLC, Republic Title Turtle Creek, Amy Carenza and Nathan Offerdahl, Potpourri of Silk, Soap Hope, Shirlee and Charles Bealke, Suzanne and Wayne Braddick, Diana and David Ezzell, Scott Griggs, Colleen and Ken Kelley, Cornerstone Home Lending, Masterman, La Calle Doce and El Ranchito, Methodist Medical System, Norma’s Café, RPGA Design Group, Ryan Frahm – Origins Bank Home, Lending, Square Foot and Vickie Turner.

Tickets start at $50. And if you’re already got plans that night, consider taking a tour of The Well Community and discover the various programs that are offered to help deal with an very real challenge within lives.

Gingerbread Stroll Returns To HP Village For Viewing And Bidding Thru December 1 For Clayton Dabney Foundation For Kids With Cancer

Yum! The holidays are just brimming with sugary delights and Highland Park Village will be a sweet-tooth stroller’s delight thanks to real estate sweetie Christine McKenny and Event Advisor Lynn McBee, the 5th Annual Gingerbread Stroll will be delighting all from Friday, November 17, through Friday, December 1.

Christine McKenny (File photo)

Lynn McBee (File photo)

This year’s gingerbread house displays will benefit Clayton Dabney Foundation for Kids with Cancer with 100% proceeds going to the nonprofits.

According to Christine, “The Gingerbread Stroll has become a wonderful tradition during the most wonderful time of the year. People of all ages gather with their family and friends to attend, and it’s always exciting to see how the chefs express themselves creatively. Everyone loves a gingerbread house!”

This year’s culinary architects will include Bird Bakery, Architecture Demarest, Chocolate Secrets, Hilton Anatole, Hotel Crescent Court, Hyatt Regency at Reunion, Omni Dallas Hotel, Charlie’s Pastry Chef Winter Lockwood-Frank and Pastry Works’ Pastry Chef Arielle Sutcliffe.

The Gingerbread Stroll*

Hosting the confectionary cuties will be Beretta Gallery, Bird Bakery, Bistro 31, Draper James, Kiehl s Since 1851, Leggiadro, Market Highland Park, Robert Talbott, Roberta Roller Rabbit, Royal Blue Grocery, The Tot and Trina Turk.

Well known for delicious abodes, Allie Beth Allman and Associates will be the presenting sponsor.

It’s free for the walking and viewing. But to help raise the funds, all can bid on the gingerbread homes via the silent auction. And there will be giveaway prizes, including a holiday carriage ride for six by Threejays Carriages.   

* Graphic provided by Gingerbread Stroll

JUST IN: 34th Annual St. Valentine’s Day Luncheon And Fashion Show Theme And Awardees Announced

2018 Saint Valentine Luncheon and Fashion Show Co-Chairs Roz Colombo and Nancy Gopez gathered their gal pals and Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of North Texas supporters together last night at Amy Turner’s. The occasion was to announce more details about the 34th annual fundraiser.

Roz Colombo, Amy Turner and Nancy Gopez*

Heather Randall and Kristen Sanger*

As previously reported, the whole kit-and-kaboodle is moving to NorthPark Center’s Center Park Garden in a mammoth, see-thru tent on Thursday, February 8, with Jan Strimple coordinating the show. Serving as honorary chair will be NorthPark’s First Lady Nancy Nasher. Roz and Nancy managed to get 2017 Saint V-Day Chair Heather Randall to serve as their advisor.

The news of the night was the reveal of the theme “Sculpting A Cure!” and the 2018 award recipients. Receiving the Lynda Adleta Heart of Gold Award will be Mona Carlton Stogner and Grey Stogner “for their dedication towards finding cures.”

As for the Tom Landry Character Award, seven-year-old Caitlin Johnson will be presented with the award named after the late Dallas Cowboys coach. The back story on Caitlin is pretty darn amazing. But stay tuned. It will be revealed in the days to come.

* Photo provided by Nancy Gopez

Ability Connection Texas’ 10th Annual Vine And Dine At Neiman Marcus Downtown To Honor Meredith And Jack Woodworth

Meredith and Jack Woodworth (File photo)

Neiman Marcus Downtown’s Zodiac Room doesn’t usually offer dinners, but the Ability Connection Texas’ annual Vine and Dine is the exception to the rule. On Thursday, the 10th annual fundraiser will honor Meredith and Jack Woodworth, who have been so supportive of the organization that serves children and adults with all types of physical, cognitive and acquired and developmental disabilities.

According to Ability Connection President/CEO Troy Greisen, “This segment of our population has been neglected, forgotten, and turned away, even abused and with great discrimination and prejudice, throughout world history. Still today, they are often unnoticed, uncared for, and many of them remain our society’s most vulnerable and with the greatest needs.”

In addition to a marvelous dinner prepared by the Neiman’s culinary team with Coquerel wines, there will be both silent and live auctions for everything from “decadent vacation getaways to fine handbags, shoes and jewelry sponsored by Neiman Marcus.”

Tickets are available here.

VNA’s 5th Annual Power Of Pie Order Deadline Extended To Saturday

VNA pecan pie*

VNA pumpkin pie*

Once again VNA is coming to the rescue. With Thanksgiving dinner menus in countdown mode, they’re helping to solve the problem of dessert with their 5th Annual Power of Pie.

For a mere $25, hosts/hostesses can order a pecan or pumpkin pie cooked up by top-notch operations and chefs like Empire Baking Company, Oddfellows, The Ritz-Carlton, The Adolphus Hotel, Whiskey Cake Kitchen and Bar, Knife, Dessert Dreams, Ida Claire, Bisous Bisous Patisserie, La Duni, Norma’s Café, Fairmont Hotel, The Ranch Las Colinas, Pink Apron Pastry, Haute Sweets, Mansion on Turtle Creek, El Centro College, Brownwen Weber Frosted Art Bakery and Studio, Collin College Institute of Hospitality, Embassy Suites by Hilton Dallas Park Central, Wolfgang Puck, Crossroads Diner, Society Bakery and Central Market.

There’s also the lighter-than-air Zero Calorie Pie. According to Empire Baking Company’s Meaders Ozarow, a couple of folks, who bought “Zero Calorie Pies” last year, showed up expecting to get one. Wrong. The Zero Calorie Pie is simply a way to make a $25 donation.

Meaders Ozarow (File photo)

Katherine Krause (File photo)

Proceeds from the pie-athong will benefit VNA’s Meals on Wheels and Hospice Care programs

Pie pickups will take place on Tuesday, November 21, and Wednesday, November 22.

Due to the fact that the VNA team is bound and determined to accommodate all and beat last year’s total, VNA President/CEO Katherine Krause reported that they’re extending the order deadline to Saturday. So, order online now! And why not get one of each?