Sold-Out Alert!: Robert S. Folsom Leadership Award Dinner

David Miller (File photo)

Good news and not-so-good news! The Robert S. Folsom Leadership Award Dinner honoring David B. Miller is totally sold out. So, if you got your reservations in, it’s a good news situation.

On the other hand, if you decided to wait, you’re out of luck. That’s not-so-good news.

However, Methodist Health System Foundation Vice President Angela Nash reports that it would take an “uber check” to get a seat now. So, get that Black Card out pronto, if you want to see what the Methodist team has up their collective sleeves to celebrate the man who could easily see eye-to-eye with Dirk or Mayor Mike.

BTW, proceeds from the dinner at the Hilton Anatole will “support the new Robert S. Folsom Wellness Center at Methodist Dallas Medical Center — an inclusive wellness center that will provide health improvement programs to families in Southern Dallas.”

Sold-Out Alert!: Dallas Women’s Foundation’s 32nd Annual Luncheon

Dallas Women’s Foundation*

So sorry if you held off on getting your ticket for the Dallas Women’s Foundation fundraising luncheon on Friday, October 20, at the Hilton Anatole. Luncheon Co-Chairs Shonn Brown and Lisa Singleton just reported that the 32nd Annual Luncheon featuring Dr. Hope Jahren is sold out.

BTW, if you didn’t get your reservation in, there’s always the hefty check that just might a spot available. In the meantime, the following sponsors have their place setting locked down:

  • Platinum sponsors — U.S. Trust and Lyda Hill
  • Speaker sponsors — Suzanne Ahn, M.D. Speaker Endowment Fund at Dallas Women’s Foundation and Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt
  • Crystal sponsors — American Airlines, The Men and Women of Hunt Consolidated Inc., Texas Instruments and Young Women’s Preparatory Network
  • Diamond sponsors — EY, FedEx, Freeman, Jones Day and Kimberly-Clark
  • Emerald sponsors — AT&T Inc., Ellenore and Kirk Baker/Carter Financial Mgmt., Barings Multifamily Capital LLC, Lucy and Henry Billingsley, Cecilia G. Boone, Chatham Hill Investment Partnership, Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Paula and Ron Parker, Service King Collision Repair, Betty and Steve Suellentrop and Toyota
  • Gold sponsors — AdvoCare International LP, Sindley Austin, Bank of Texas, Baron and Blue Foundation, Ann M. Berger, Phyllis F. Bernstein, Brunswick Group, Nancy P. Carlson, Serena Simmons Connelly, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Rex W. Thompson, Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Cindy Engles/Dodee Crockett, The Episcopal School of Dallas, Patricia W. Fagadau, Amy L. Fikes, Frost Bank, Kay Winzenried and Sheila Gallagher, Greenhill School, The Hart Group Inc., Haynes and Boone LLP, Al G. Hill Jr., The Hockaday School, Jane and Michael Hurst, JLL, Locke Lord, Lottye and Bobby Lyle, Lynn Pinker Cox and Hurst, Marty Marks, Alice and Erle Nye, Parish Episcopal School, PepsiCo, Julia Simon/Mary Kay, Southwest Airlines, Tolleson Wealth Management, Trinity Industries Inc. and Donna M. Wilhelm
  • Silver sponsors — Aetna, Bank of America Plaza, Angie Bain, Julie Bleicher and Gail Griswold, Lael Brodsky, Shonn Brown, Veree Brown, CBRE, Capital One Bank, Children’s Health, Communities Foundation of Texas, Ka Cotter and Sidney Hicks, Cristo Rey Dallas, Kaleta A. Doolin, The Enrico Foundation, FedEx Office, Melissa Fetter, Marion T. Flores and Margaret Keliher, Michelle Frymire, Sidney Hicks, HilltopSecurities Inc., Hind for Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation, HudsonLake, Insperity, JP Morgan Chase, Jackson Walker L.L.P., Brenda L. Jackson, Junior League of Dallas Inc., KIPP Dallas – Fort Worth, Kristi Kastl, Margaret Keliher, Katherine Glaze Lyle and Sharon Lyle, McKinsey and Company, Methodist Health System Foundation, Neiman Marcus, Ava Norris, Cecilia and Tim Norwood, Lori Reisenbichler, Karen J. Simon, The Sister Fund, Solis Mammography, Debby Hay Spradley, Gail Warrior-Suchy and Colleen Affeldt, Texas Woman’s University, Thompson and Knight, TIAA, UT Southwestern, UTA University Crossroads, The University of Texas at Dallas, Vinson and Elkins LLP, Katrina Watland, Westwood Management and Williams Family Foundation
* Graphic courtesy of Dallas Women's Foundation

Dirk Receives Some Ribbing—And The H. Neil Mallon Award—At World Affairs Council Dinner

The H. Neil Mallon Award, the signature annual honor bestowed by the World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth, has had some pretty impressive recipients over the years, from Vice President Richard Cheney and President George H.W. Bush to Ray Hunt, Randall Stephenson and Rex Tillerson. But it’s safe to say it’s never had a taller—or a more gracious—recipient than it did Friday, September 22, when Dirk Nowitzki was presented with the WAC’s 34th annual award during a dinner event at the Hilton Anatole.

Dirk Nowitzki*

Guests including Nancy Nasher and David Haemisegger, Brent Christopher, Allie Beth and Pierce Allman, Keven Ann Willey and Georges Badoux, Christopher Durovich, Tanya Roberts, Carolina Beltran, Consul General Francisco De La Torre, Jan Miller and Jeff Rich, James Waters, Maurizio La Noce, Regina Montoya and Paul Coggins, Kay and Rob Harrell and Mary and Bob Potter turned out to honor Dirk, the legendary, 7-feet-tall power forward for the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks. Besides holding many league and team records, the German-born hoopster is a much-honored philanthropist, serving as a guidepost with his wife, Jessica, for The Dirk Nowitzki Foundation.

Marjorie Adams*

After being welcomed by Dinner Chair Marjorie A. Adams, who also chairs the WAC board, as well as WAC President and CEO Jim Falk, the guests enjoyed a dinner of baby spinach and frisee salad, peppercorn crusted beef filet and jumbo shrimp, and an apple streudel dessert. Then they  heard from His Excellency Yousef Al Otaiba, ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to the United States.

Bret Baier and Yousef Al Otaiba*

Otaiba had flown in from Abu Dhabi and New York to introduce the evening’s guest speaker, FOX News Channel anchor Bret Baier, but he couldn’t resist some gentle ribbing of Dirk. “Please keep working on that jump shot,” he advised the Mallon honoree, “because you only shot 38 percent last year. It’s not like anyone’s going to block your shot …”

Baier picked up the joke from there, branding Otaiba’s 38 percent statistic “fake news.” Corrected Bret, deadpan: “I think it’s at least 42 percent.” Baier recounted a little about his show, “Special Report with Bret Baier,” and said that in the D.C. news business this year, “every day is like drinking from a firehose.” The FOX star, who’s an accomplished golfer, recalled playing golf with President Trump—”he is all about winning, and he doesn’t really care how he does it”—before lauding Dirk for his under-the-radar visits to young patients at Children’s Health in Dallas.

Following a video tribute to Nowitzki featuring the likes of Mavs owner Mark Cuban, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings took the stage, clad in a tuxedo, and said of Dirk, “He represents Dallas like no other, because he represents excellence.” The man of the hour then accepted the Mallon Award from Rawlings and Adams and, with characteristic good humor, leaned down into the mic to rebut Otaiba’s allegation about his poor jump shot: “Mr. Ambassador, I’m not sure where you’re lookin’ at your stats … but I’ll try to do better next year!”

With that, the 39-year-old star sat down for a casual, on-stage chat with Mark Followill, the Mavs’ TV play-by-play announcer. Here are a couple of Dirk’s observations from the talk on:

  • Coming from Germany to Dallas: “My parents watched the TV show ‘Dallas’ once in a while, but it was not my thing. I was into MTV and sports. [Once I got to] Dallas, it was almost like they wanted me to succeed here from Day One.”
  • What he’s been doing recently: “I’ve just been traveling for about six-and-a-half weeks with [the Nowitzkis’] three little kids. It was … what’s the word? … great! [Lots of laughter.] Challenging!”
  • His future plans: “When I retire from basketball, I’m sure Cubes will give me a job, hopefully. But hopefully I’ll do it another year or two, then let the young guys take over.”
* Photo credit: Steve Foxall

 

Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Members Learned About “The First Three Hours” From Integrative Emergency Services’ Dr. Z

North Texas is blessed with three Level 1 trauma centers for adults (Baylor University Medical Center, Methodist Dallas Medical Center and Parkland Memorial Hospital) plus a children’s facility at Children’s Medical Center. On Tuesday, September 12, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board luncheon was filled to the brim on the 10th floor of the Sammons Center to hear “The First Three Hours: What Everyone Needs To Know About An Emergency Department.”

While the new members of the board like Ann Barbier-Mueller, Tricia Rippey Besing, Bradley Brookshire, Lauren Combest, Carol Dalton, Janelle Davis, Robert Dobrient, Tom Dunning, Tucker Enthoven, Jeremy Ford, Bruce Hunt, Jason Kulas, Zelig Lieberman, Scott Luttrell, Matthew Rubel, Thomas Sabin Jr., Charles Shufeldt, Connie Sigel, Theresa Simoni, John Tolleson and Christi Urschel attended orientation, the vets filled the dining room.

Tom Dunning

Tucker Enthoven and Kristi Sherrill Hoyl

On each of the tables were salads, beverages and small cakes. The dessert was specially selected because, unbeknownst to most, it was Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson’s favorite and it was his birthday. But the staffers warned that Robin wasn’t making a big deal of it.

Nick Zenarosa, Norm Bagwell, Robin Robinson and Jim Hinton

It was also the debut of Norm Bagwell as chair of the Foundation. Norm welcomed the group including Marti Carlin, Gregg Kirkland, Jill Smith, Paul Stoffel, Dr. John Garrett, Lindalyn Adams and Peggy Riggs and provided the invocation.

Marti Carlin and Gregg Kirkland

John Garrett

Paul Stoffel

Christi Urschel and Jill Smith

During lunch, the talk was about Norm’s wife, Robin Bagwell, not listening to doctor’s order to stay off her feet. Instead she went on hikes and trips. The results? Crutches…. Former Baylor Health Care System Foundation Vice President Clare Graca is back in North Texas after serving as Managing Director of Development for Harvard Business School. Her goal had been to haul in $1 billion in five years. Clare did it in three. What brought her back? Her new role as chief business development officer for Integrative Emergency ServicesKristen Hinton was spending time in New Mexico while the Hinton kids were completing school and Dallas for events like the day’s luncheon…. Lisa Troutt’s being back in Dallas after attending Ray Washburne’s swearing in as Overseas Private Investment Corp. CEO by Vice-President Mike Pence.  

Lisa Troutt

Susan McSherry

Following lunch, Foundation Development VP Susan McSherry provided fundraising plans for the year to come and admitted that the week of October 23 was going to be a busy one with Grand Rounds Golf Tournament on October 23, Celebrating Women Luncheon on October 26 and Healthy Harvest on October 28.

As for the year past, Robin reported that the Foundation crew had closed the fiscal year surpassing its $30M goal by raising $30.2M with major gifts totaling $10M in major gifts. Since its “inception in 1978, the Foundation has raised more than $611.6 million for Baylor Scott and White Health – North Texas.”

Robin Robinson and Nick Zenarosa

He then was joined by Integrative Emergency Services Founder/CEO Nick Zenarosa (aka Dr. Z) to discuss the world of emergency services. When the room was polled on how many had sought ER services for themselves and/or family and friends, more than half the room raised their hands.

Leonard Riggs and Clare Garca

While some folks may not have realized, Nick explained how ER facilities at main healthcare centers are operated by companies, like Integrative Emergency Services, that specialize in emergency services. In tipping his hat to Dr. Leonard Riggs, he told how Leonard had pioneered the establishment of the unique services. In fact, Baylor Dallas’ ER is named the Riggs Emergency Department.

At one point, Leonard addressed the group recalling how, back in the 1970s, one would go to an ER with a specific trauma and the healthcare provider might be an ophthalmologist one day and an orthopedic specialist the next.

Nick was asked if the ER was like what was seen on TV shows like “ER” and “Chicago Fire.” Nick admitted that it wasn’t so dramatic. Apparently, such traumatic situations as car accidents, heart attacks and shootings only make up “3% of the total volume.”

Other highlights of the conversation included:

  • The five most common reason for visiting an ER (stomach and abdominal pain, chest pain, fever, headache and cough) make up 23.4% of the visits.
  • ERs have 136M visits in the U.S.
  • There is a definite burnout rate for ER specialists.
  • They see everything from coughs to human trafficking victims with bar code tattoos.
  • At Baylor’s ER, there are three entry areas: ambulance entrance, walk-up and doctor referral.
  • The busiest days tend to be Mondays and Tuesdays.
  • Sepsis is proving to be one of the major challenges facing the healthcare community, with 1.5M American affected and 250K dying annually.
  • Another great challenge facing ERs is the blood clot. 900K Americans suffer clots annually. The damages created by a clot can greatly be reduced thanks to immediate attention and action.

He described the various types of emergency services — telemedicine, retail “Minute Clinic,” doctor’s office, urgent care, freestanding and emergency department.

An ER doctor tends to be a unique personality, Nick claimed. He described them as tending to eat a 1,000 calorie meal in 30 seconds. 

When asked about unique cases, Nick hesitated, but he told of the man who had been bitten on the finger by his pet rattlesnake. Instead of calling it a day, the man held the snake up to his face. The rattler bit his tongue swelling it up and prevented him from breathing.

Following the exchange between Robin and Nick, Baylor Scott And White Health CEO Jim Hinton told of a Dallas policeman who had suffered a heart attack on the Katy Trail. Despite others fearing he had died, the ER team kept him alive and he recovered, thanks to a unique department especially geared for such people as first responders.

With a twinkle in his eye, Jim then suggested to Nick that if Chicago had “Chicago Fire,” North Texas could have “Dallas Clot.” Needless to say, Jim knows how to end a meeting with a laugh and a smile.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Meeting

Nick Zenarosa, Norm Bagwell, Robin Robinson and Jim Hinton

Leonard Riggs and Clare Garca

In today’s world with all types of emergencies facing folks, from bad coughs to devastating accidents, the need for top-notch emergency rooms is vital to the North Texas community. On Tuesday, September 12, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board learned firsthand about the challenges, developments and the differences among the emergency facilities from Integrated Emergency Services Founder/CEO Dr. Nick Zenarosa at its quarterly meeting. The subject was “The First Three Hours: What Everyone Needs To Know About An Emergency Department.”

In addition to the new and old board members in attendance was Dr. Leonard Riggs, who was a pioneer in emergency room developments.

The occasion also marked Norm Bagwell’s debut as board chair and the addition of new board members.

While the post is being prepared, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery for the folks who lunched and learned.

BTW, Dr. Z revealed what day of the week is the busiest one for an ER. Think about it. The answer will be in the MSC post.

JUST IN: Jordan Spieth Gifts Children’s Pauline Allen Gill Center For Cancer And Blood Disorders Due To Friends Battling Cancer

After being war-torn by all the weather woes from Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, local golf wunderkind Jordan Spieth has provided some very uplifting news… and it’s not a hole-in-one. It’s so much better.

His Jordan Spieth Family Foundation has just presented its largest single gift to Children’s Medical Center Foundation to benefit two specific programs at Children’s Health Pauline Allen Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders:

  • Child Life Program that “will support services like music, art and pet therapy that are not covered by insurance but are essential for helping children cope with the social and emotional challenges of illness.”
  • Experimental Therapeutics Program in childhood cancer that “will help up to 10 children and their families each year travel to Dallas to take part in clinical trials not offered elsewhere.”

Originally, his foundation’s focus was based on three pillars — special-needs youth, junior golf and military families. But he recently added a fourth area of support — children battling cancer.

Eric Leyendecker, Jordan Spieth, Chris Durovich and Patty Leyendecker*

The reason for the addition was “watching a lifelong friend [Jordan’s childhood friend and former Children’s Health patient Eric Leydendecker] take on a recurring battle with cancer.”

According to Jordan, “Investing this gift in my hometown pediatric hospital, one of the best in the country, is a really special moment for me. There are thousands of children treated for cancer every year at Children’s Health. I have personally lost a friend to it. Recently watching my best friend as he went through treatments inspired us to make this an official pillar of the Foundation. We are eager to help wherever we can.”

Brent Christopher (File photo)

The area of pediatric cancer research has resulted in a survival rate of 58% in the mid-1970s, rising to more than 80% today, thanks to funded research and treatments.

Children’s Medical Center Foundation President Brent Christopher reported, “It is impossible to measure the impact that Jordan Spieth’s generosity will have on children now and into the future. We are so grateful for his commitment to help children battling cancer, as well as his trust in Children’s Health. Jordan’s support will help us deliver the very best care and continue our relentless pursuit of better treatments – and, hopefully, cures – so that one day no child will be faced with cancer.”

* Photo provided by Children's Medical Center Foundation

Tucker Enthoven’s Dinner Table Was Serving Up Invitations For Celebrating Women Fundraiser With Jamie Lee Curtis

Tucker Enthoven

Celebrating Women Luncheon Chair Tucker Enthoven was getting ready to head to Spain for a bicycling trip on Tuesday, June 20. But before she left for the other side of the pond, she rallied the troops at her Preston Hollow “cottage” to address invitations for the Baylor Health Care System Foundation fundraiser on Thursday, October 26, at the Hilton Anatole to fight breast cancer.

The Enthoven dinner table

Around the table with pens in hand were outgoing Tucker’s mom Julie Ford, Baylor Foundation Board Chair Margo Goodwin, Pat McEvoy, Angie Kadesky, Suzy Gekiere, Marie Dean, Ann Dyer, Underwriting Chair Ola Fojasek‘s mother Jacqueline Fojtasek (Ola was out of town and Jacqueline was subbing in) and Barbara Stuart. On the floor was 15-year-old Australian Shepherd Stealer. He may have looked a bit long-in-the-tooth, but thanks to his titanium back leg, he was amazingly spry and greeting the ladies.

Margo Goodwin

Pat McEvoy

When asked how the fundraising efforts going, Tucker didn’t hesitate. It was right on target.

Perhaps it was the fact that the keynote speaker was Jamie Lee Curtis. With all the recent headlines about Carrie Fisher’s sad demise, fellow Hollywood urchin Jamie had taken a totally different road successfully battling drugs and alcohol, as well as the threat of breast cancer at the age of 40.

True Carrie had scored hits with “Star Wars” and writing, but Jamie had cut her own praise with “Trading Places,” “Halloween,” “Perfect,” “A Fish Called Wanda,” “True Lies” and “Freaky Friday,” plus her 12 children’s books, including New York Times best seller “Today I Feel Silly: And Other Moods That Make My Day.”

In the past 17 years,  the Celebrating Women Luncheon has raised more than $28M “to help Baylor Scott And White fight breast cancer in North Texas.”

Blue butterfly stamps

The invitations were scheduled to drop in the snail mail the week of August 14. They’ll be easy to spot thanks to the blue butterfly stamps. If you haven’t gotten yours, don’t pout or stew. Just check in here and let them know you want your seat pronto. And if you’re interested in a sponsorship, you’d better hustle. The sponsorships for the invitations, centerpieces, programs and video have already been sold.

Dallas Women’s Foundation Celebrates The Launch Of Unlocking Leadership Campaign’s Leadership Key Club On Kleinert’s Terrace

As the driest May in 90 years closed down on Wednesday, May 31, Unlocking Leadership Campaign Co-Chairs Ashlee and Chris Kleinert’s terrace overlooking Bent Tree Country Club seemed downright charming. There was just enough breeze and cool drinks to keep guests outside in the 92-degree temperature to dine and celebrate the launch of the Dallas Women’s Foundation Leadership Key Club.

Floating flamingo

The jumbo flamingo floating in the pool was so inviting that it was surprising that none of the guests didn’t hop in for a dip.

Haven’t heard of Key Club since high school? Well, the DWF one is a bit different. It doesn’t involve high school students. But both organizations share in the common denominator of leadership. While the high school group is made up of young people who encourage leadership through servicing, the DWF version is “a new recognition level for those who have contributed $100,000 of more” to the DWF’s Unlocking Leadership Campaign that will target to specific areas for women:

  • Economic Security Initiative that will strengthen the economic security of 16,000 women and girls by 2021, and to date, has already reached more than 8,750 women and girls.
  • Leadership Initiative that will provide 60,000 women and girls with leadership training and opportunities, and thus far has reached nearly 28,000 women and girls through grant-making and programs.

According to Ashlee, “The future of North Texas is directly tied to the economic security and potential of leadership of women and girls in our community. It’s impossible to create a brighter future for North Texas communities without focusing specifically on the current condition, immediate needs and potential of women of all ages and backgrounds.”

Ashlee and Chris, Ros Dawson Thompson and Paula Parker

 

Michael and Janice Sharry

Toni Munoz-Hunt

The Kleinerts, their fellow co-chairs Paula and Ron Parker and DWF President/CEO Ros Dawson Thompson were celebrating the launch of  the club that included initial members Ellenore and Kirk Baker, Lucy and Henry Billingsley, Cecilia and Garrett Boone, Kalita and Ed Blessing, Erin and Bob Botsford, Jill and Jim Cochran, Serena and Tom Connelly, Ka and L.L. Cotter, Peggy Simmons Dear, Kaleta A. Doolin and Alan Govenar, Lauren Embrey, Julie and Bob England, Beverly Goulet, Trish Houck and Lyssa Jenkens, Heather L. Hunt, Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Anne Knight, Sarah Losinger, Ann E. and Fred Margolin, Maribess and Jerry Miller, Retta Miller, Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt, Diane S. Paddison, Paula and Ron Parker, Betty S. Regard, Lisa and Matt Rose, Janice and Michael Sharry, Lisa K. Simmons, Sue and Paul Spellman, Betty and Stephen Suellentrop, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Rex W. Thompson, Patricia A. Vaughan and Barbara S. Turner, Martha and Max Wells, Donna M. Wilhelm, Shawna D. Wilson and Trea and Richard Yip.

Ann Margolin and Retta Miller

Ka Cotter

 

Ellenore Baker

Kirk Baker

Thanks to the Key Club, DWF’s Unlocking Leadership Campaign is standing at $36.5 and inching closer to its $50M goal. If you want to “key” into the march to success, contact Shawn Wills at 214.525.5318.

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Dallas Women’s Foundation 32nd Annual Luncheon

According Dallas Women’s Foundation Luncheon Co-Chairs A. Shonn Brown and Lisa Singleton,

Lisa Singleton and Shonn Brown (File photo)

If you’ve always wanted to hear from one of Time Magazine’s Top 100 Influential People and a New York Times best-selling author, while also supporting the Dallas Women’s Foundation, then we invite you to join us on Friday, October 20, for the 32nd Annual Luncheon at the Hilton Anatole.

Our speaker this year is Dr. Hope Jahren, a brilliant scientist whose achievements as a paleobiologist are rivaled by her achievements as an author and advocate for gender equity in science.

Hope Jahren*

Dr. Jahren is recognized as a change maker. According to Time: “It is a rare breed of scientist who is both a leader in her field and a great writer, but Hope Jahren is both. (She) has built a career and a reputation in science by unearthing secrets hidden in fossilized plant life. Her work has resulted in at least 70 studies in dozens of journals, but it’s also given her a platform—a megaphone, really—to talk about something else: widespread sexual harassment and discrimination in science. On her blog, in op-eds and in her memoir, Lab Girl, which debuted on the New York Times best-seller list, Jahren wields her influence to call out a culture that has caused women to flee the field she so loves…And whether she’s writing about lab funding, discrimination or deciduous trees, she has a way of making you love it [science] too.”

Special thanks to our current sponsors:

  • Platinum Sponsor: U.S. Trust Company and Bank of America Private Wealth Management
  • Speaker Sponsors: Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt and The Suzanne Ahn, M.D. Speaker Endowment Fund at Dallas Women’s Foundation
  • Diamond Sponsor: Kimberly-Clark Corporation and Freeman
  • Emerald Sponsors: AT&T, Inc., Ellenore and Kirk Baker/Carter Financial Mgmt., Lucy and Henry Billingsley, Chatham Hill Investment Partnership, Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Service King Collision Repair, Betty and Steve Suellentrop and Toyota
  • Gold Sponsor: Bank of Texas, Phyllis F. Bernstein, Nancy P. Carlson, Serena Simmons Connelly, Sheila Gallagher and Kay M. Winzenried, Haynes and Boone LLP, The Hart Group, Inc., Al G. Hill Jr., Alice and Erle Nye and Trinity Industries, Inc.
  • Silver Sponsors: Bank of America Plaza, Julia Bleicher and Gail Griswold, Veree Brown, Melissa Fetter, Marion T. Flores and Margaret Keliher, JP Morgan Chase, Jackson Walker, L.L.P., Junior League of Dallas Inc., Neiman Marcus, Cecilia and Tim Norwood, Julia A. Simon, The University of Texas at Arlington, TIAA and Katrina Watland
  • Media Sponsors: Dallas Business Journal, D CEO, MySweetCharity.

Luncheon sponsorships are still available, ranging from $3,500 to $50,000; individual tickets are available at $500 to $1,000. Sponsorships are available at www.DallasWomensFdn.org/luncheon or by calling 214.525.5318

The Foundation is in the midst of a campaign raising $50 million, with $35 million of that already achieved. Monies raised at the October 20 luncheon will further the cause of investing in women and girls to have positive ripple effects in families, communities and the globe.

JUST IN: American Airlines Exec Bev Goulet’s Recent Retirement Resulted In A $50K Grant For Dallas Women’s Foundation

When an American Airlines officer retires, the company honors them “with the opportunity to direct grants to organizations that mean the most to the retiree.” Recently AA Executive VP/Chief Integration Officer Bev Goulet retired and designated Dallas Women’s Foundation should be the recipient of her grant.

According to Bev, “This gift is a reflection of the great heart of American Airlines, and I am very proud that the company made this grant in my honor to an organization and undertaking that mean so much to me personally. Dallas Women’s Foundation works on behalf of all women and girls, and in particular those who face the greatest social and economic challenges. Their work matters, and I am grateful to American for supporting it with this terrific gift.”

Bev Goulet and Roslyn Dawson*

Whoa! DWF President/CEO Ros Dawson must have thought it was snowing, since it seemed like Christmas when she received the $50,000 grant.

As a DWF board and executive committee member, Bev knew exactly how she wanted the funds used — to support DWF’s “Young Women’s Initiative-Dallas, a new cross-sector effort to empower and affirm young women of color ages 16-24 from Dallas’ southern and western sectors.”

Ros commented, “This generous gift from American Airlines is especially meaningful as it honors Bev, a true champion for women and girls, and provides early support for a critical new initiative that will launch later this fall. Bev Goulet is such an extraordinary example of a strong woman who is dedicated to making the world better for all. We are so fortunate that she is now lending her formidable leadership skills and knowledge to our work and mission.”

BTW, DWF’s Unlocking Leadership Campaign is still underway for its $50M goal. Contact Shawn Wills for more info.

* Photo provided by Dallas Women's Foundation

Double Centennial Celebration Of DCMSAF And Aldredge House Included Memories Of A Disrobing Sue Ellen And “The Country Club Girls”

Susan McSherry was on the verge of moving from a home that her family had carefully restored. She was amazed that despite the meticulous restoration, potential buyers were wondering where the playroom and/or media room was.

Joel and Susan Williams

Caroline Rose Hunt and Dedie Leahy

Max Wells

Anne Hobson

Nancy Carter

Stuart Bumpas

How ironic on a day when 340 guests like  Susan Williams and husband Highland Park Mayor Joel Williams, former Dallas City Manager Mary Suhm, Veletta Lill, Marj Waters, Robin Robinson, Caroline Rose Hunt, Max Wells, Anne Hobson, Nancy Carter, Debbie Francis, Sara Martineau, Carlton Adams, Margo Goodwin, Marilyn Augur, Aileen Pratt, Jill Smith, Ann Dyer, Barbara Sypult, Stuart Bumpas, Christie Carter, Angie Kadesky, Dedie Leahy and noted local historian Virginia McAlester were celebrating a double centennial of the Dallas County Medical Society Alliance Foundation (DCMSAF) and the historic Aldredge House at the Dallas Country Club.

Mary McDermott Cook, Debbie Francis and Barbara Sypult

To add to the occasion, Co-Chairs Sharon and Mike McCullough arranged to have 105-year-old Margaret McDermott and Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler on hand as honorary co-chairs.

Barenda Hino

Pierce Allman and Marj Waters

With history-loving Pierce Allman serving as emcee introduced 100th DCMSAF President Barenda Hino.

Highlights of the luncheon included Lunch Co-Chair Lindalyn Adams without notes telling the 100-year founding of DCMSAF with DCMSAF historian Elizabeth Gunby looking on. Lindalyn had both honorary co-chairs speak.

Having grown up on Swiss Avenue, Ruth told of her childhood growing up with her two big brothers, Jim Collins and Carr Collins. It was Carr, who raced up stairs telling mother Collins, “Mother, come get Ruthie. She’s showing off again.”

Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler

Margaret Milam McDermott

Next to speak was “the heroine of cultural arts” —Margaret Milam McDermott. Staying in her wheelchair, she thanked the crowd and had her daughter Mary McDermott Cook speak for her.  Mary turned the mic over to Joel, who said he had a special honor being seated between the two honorary co-chairs. He then said that if the group wanted to raise some money, he would be willing to auction off his seat. Joel then told how Margaret moved into the city of Highland Park in 1919 and has lived in the town longer “than anyone else that we know.” He went on to recall that each year Margaret has been invited to light the Highland Park Christmas tree on Armstrong, which is the oldest Christmas tradition in Dallas County. For the past five years, “Margaret has shown up and lighted that 152-year-old tree.”

After lunch Lindalyn and Pierce were joined on stage by American historian/author Dr. William Seale, who is a rock star in the world of historic renovation and preservation. When asked if the younger generation was appreciating and supporting past works, he said, “Most definitely. In fact, there are magazines devoted to it. The mistake that sometimes made is to try to convert a house into what you already understand is how the house should be rather than knowing it and basing your renovations on the building, letting the building be itself. That is one of the big things in architectural design and remodeling houses today is to understand the past of the house and honor that.”

Lindalyn Adams

Lindalyn recalled when a TV crew that had worked with “The Waltons” program negotiated to film a new show at Aldredge House. The only caveat was that they ‘wouldn’t say anything derogatory about our city.” They agreed saying it was a family show. The pilot aired with Sue Ellen Ewing forced to disrobe in Mrs. Aldredge’s parlor. The phone lines lit up. The show turned out to be “Dallas.” 

When Aldredge family member Betty Aldredge Slater was later in Europe, word got out that it was her family’s parlor that Sue Ellen shed her clothes, the BBC interviewed her. Betty’s doctor also noted that he “particularly liked your stables.”

William told how visitors to historic homes want “authenticity. They’re very honest. If you’re honest to them, they’re honest to you. You don’t have to recreate the battle on the front yard. You just have to be accurate. In this world the historic building or house is a very worthwhile thing. In a world that we live in that doesn’t have a lot of accuracy. Most of what we look at or see on television is inaccurate. If you know anything about it, you know it’s inaccurate. It( the historic building) is the real thing. That’s what people appreciated in these places.”

William Seale

When asked if The Aldredge House belonged on a national register of historical places in addition to its being recently receiving  a Texas Historical Marker, William said, “Absolutely. Absolutely.” 

Admitting that it would never be a mass tourist attraction due to logistics and the Alliance not want it to be, William went on to say that for people who seek it out, it will always provide for them what they’re after. 

Going a bit off subject, he told how President Woodrow Wilson “hadn’t liked women, but he was controlled by women. As the war approached, suffrage, you know had organized the ladies everywhere. They demanded that a women’s commission for the government on the war and finally Wilson grudgingly did it. They laughed about it and called them ‘country club girls’ in Washington and they were kind of poo-pooed and made fun of. It is true that the first thing they did was to sponsor a law that removed brothels and saloons from being near the Army camps. There is an old story in New Orleans about Lulu White, the famous madame in Storeyville, being in a bread line. When asked why she was there, she said, ‘The country club girls have put us out of business.'”

Alas, just as the celebration was scheduled to conclude with a champagne toast, it had to be done with ice tea. Seems behind the scenes the bottles of bubbly hadn’t been uncorked in time.

For more pictures from the event, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Five Outstanding Women Are Honored At The Dallas Women’s Foundation’s Leadership Forum And Awards Dinner

The Dallas Women’s Foundation really knows how to throw a VIP reception. Consider the one held before the group’s May 9 Leadership Forum and Awards Dinner, which was intended to honor the recipients of the foundation’s 2017 Maura Women Helping Women and Young Leader Awards.

Inside the packed VIP reception room at the Omni Dallas Hotel were not just one or two, but all five of the women who were the very first recipients of the Women Helping Women awards back in 1978 and 1979. Mixing with the guests were Maura McNeil, for whom the Maura Awards are named; Vivian Castleberry; Ginny Whitehill; the Hon. Eddie Bernice Johnson; and the Hon. Adlene Harrison.

Maura McNiel*

Adlene Harrison and Susie Marshall*

Francis Griffin Brown and Ginny Whitehill*

Vivian Castleberry and Hind El Saadi El Jarrah*

Outside the VIP tete-a-tete, meantime, many of the evening’s 850 guests were preparing to sweep into the Dallas Ballroom for the program and a wonderful dinner (saffron poached pear salad, grilled petite filet and breast of chicken, assorted vegetables, and two types of tarts). The event’s co-chairs, Cheryl Alston and Laura V. Estrada, got things under way by thanking the presenting sponsor, AT&T, before giving way to Roslyn Dawson Thompson, the Dallas Women’s Foundation’s president and chief executive officer.

Laura V. Estrada, Brenda L. Jackson, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Cheryl Alston*

Ros thanked everyone and pointed out that, since 1985, the foundation has invested more than $32 million in “advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls in our community.” Then Brenda Jackson, the foundation’s selection committee co-chair, presented the honorees for the 2017 Maura Awards, which recognize exceptional leaders who have pioneered the way in improving lives for women and children.

Elba Garcia, Lupe Valdez and Madeline McClure*

Amy Ooi, Tonya Parker and Wei Wei Jeang*

Ellenore Knight Baker and Cynthia Nwuabani*

This year’s Maura winners were: Dr. Hind Jarrah, Ph.D., executive director of the Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation; Madeline McClure, founding CEO of TexProtects, the Texas Association for the Protection of Children; the Hon. Tonya Parker, judge of the 116th Civil District Court in Dallas County ; and Sheriff Lupe Valdez, the highest-ranking law enforcement officer in Dallas County. The 2017 Young Leader Award also was presented by Ellenore Knight Baker and Zeenat Sidi to Cynthia Nwaubani, CPA. 

In a series of videos about the honorees, Jarrah urged women to “look at leadership as an ability to serve.” Parker said that while there are “lots of women lawyers,” they need to take more prominent roles in the legal system: “We’re not getting speaking roles at the courthouse. Come argue the brief—don’t just write them!” Added Valdez: “Do what you need to do to step up and grow a little bit.”

Following a plea for donations—”Text Maura to 41444 to donate. Don’t hesitate; do it now!”—AT&T’s Jennifer Biry introduced the evening’s keynote speaker: Carla Harris, who is vice chairman, global wealth management, managing director, and senior client advisor at Morgan Stanley.

Harris, who was appointed by President Barack Obama to chair the National Women’s Business Council in 2013, told the attendees that “you take your life from success to significance when you do things for other people.” And doing for others through leadership, she said, is “all about the letters in the word ‘leader.’ ” Then she proceeded to tick off the word’s six letters, attaching a nugget of wisdom to each one.

Carla Harris*

“L is for ‘leverage,’ ” Harris began. “You need to encourage out-of-the-box thinking, and leverage other people’s ideas. E is for ’empower.’ A leader must define what success looks like for [her people], even when you’re operating in an obscure environment. A is for ‘authentic.’ Authenticity is at the heart of your power, and at the heart of powerful leadership. If you’re authentic, people will trust you, and it will motivate and inspire others to be authentic, too.

“D is for ‘decisive’ and ‘diversity,’” Harris continued, first explaining the decisive part. “Meg Whitman, when she was at eBay, said, ‘The price of inaction is greater than the price of making a mistake.’ Make people know that you are decisive!” As for diversity, Harris said, “We are all competing around innovation. To be innovative, you need a lot of different ideas in the room. You need a lot of perspectives. You need a lot of experience. So, you need a lot of different people. There’s the business argument for diversity!

“E is for ‘engage,’” Harris went on. “You must engage your people. You can’t motivate by fear. This is especially true for women and millennials. What motivates them? You need to ask them, ‘What’s your experience? What’s the stretch experience you’re looking for?’”

Finally, Harris said, “R is for ‘risk.’ You must be comfortable taking risks. The way to differentiate yourself is to show that you’re comfortable taking risks. Why don’t we take more risks? Because we’re scared. Fear. And fear has no place in your success equation. If you’re not sure about trying something, always default to the try.”

Harris’ message was especially apropos because, when it comes to women and girls in North Texas, no group “defaults to the try” like the Dallas Women’s Foundation. As it proved, once again, with this dinner.

* Photo credit: Kristina Bowman

JUST IN: Dallas Women’s Foundation’s “Unlocking Leadership Campaign” Adds A New Recognition Level — Leadership Key Club

The Dallas Women’s Foundation team announced “a new recognition level” — Leadership Key Club — in its Unlocking Leadership Campaign to reach its $50M goal. The Club is made up of people “who have contributed $100,000 or more.”

At the 2016 luncheon it was reported that the Campaign had hit the $32M mark.

According to Campaign Co-Chair Ashlee Kleinert, “Since the luncheon, we’ve raised an additional $3 million, which is absolutely wonderful. More than 4,000 generous donors have stepped up during what we consider to be the initial ‘quiet phase’ of the campaign, which is both humbling and exciting. Now that we’re past the campaign’s halfway mark, we want to motivate and inspire other community members to follow their example and help us cross the finish line in the near future.”

Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Paula Parker

Unlocking Leadership Campaign funds will go to the “Foundation’s primary focus areas — women’s economic security and women’s leadership.”

DWF President/CEO Roslyn Dawson Thompson explained, “An investment in this campaign is an investment to ensure that girls and women are on equal footing, which is especially important since Texas women live in poverty at a higher rate than men: only 30 percent of North Texas households are led by women, but 53 percent of all poor households are women-led. Our mission is as important today as it has ever been: Dallas Women’s Foundation invests in women and girls and empowers women’s philanthropy to build a better world. When their lives are transformed, our region and economy are transformed, and that is the ripple effect we seek to achieve.”

So far, Leadership Key Club members include Ellenore and Kirk Baker, Lucy and Henry Billingsley, Cecilia and Garrett Boone, Kalita and Ed Blessing, Erin and Bob Botsford, Jill and Jim Cochran, Serena and Tom Connelly, Ka and L.L. Cotter, Peggy Simmons Dear, Kaleta A. Doolin and Alan Govenar, Lauren Embrey, Julie and Bob England, Beverly Goulet, Trish Houck and Lyssa Jenkens, Heather L. Hunt, Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Anne Knight, Sarah and Alan Losinger, Ann E. and Fred Margolin, Janie and Cappy McGarr, Maribess and Jerry Miller, Retta Miller,Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt, Diane S. Paddison, Paula and Ron Parker, Betty S. Regard, Lisa and Matt Rose, Janice and Michael Sharry, Lisa K. Simmons, Sue and Paul Spellman, Betty and Stephen Suellentrop, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Rex W. Thompson, Patricia A. Vaughan and Barbara S. Turner, Martha and Max Wells, Donna M. Wilhelm, Shawna D. Wilson and Trea and Richard Yip.

If you want to join the Club and help in the development female leadership and well-being, contact DWF Senior VP Shawn Wills at 214.525.5318.

JUST IN: Award-Winning Paleobiologist Dr. Hope Jahren Announced As Keynoter For Dallas Women’s Foundation’s 32nd Annual Luncheon

Dallas Women’s Foundation President/CEO Ros Dawson Thompson has hardly had time to wave bye-bye to the hundreds attending last night’s Leadership Forum and Awards Dinner at the Omni, and she’s already busy announcing the speaker for the DWF’s 32nd Annual Luncheon.

Hope Jahren*

Can you say “paleobiologist”? Shoot! Spellcheck can’t even handle that one. But it’s a word that impresses those in the know. A paleobiologist is one who specializes in “a growing and comparatively new discipline which combines the methods and findings of the natural science biology with the methods and finding of the earth science paleontology.” And the leader of the pack is Dr. Hope Jahren, the “award-winning scientist, one of Time Magazine’s Top 100 Influential People, best-selling author and advocate for female equality in STEM.”

Time described Hope as

“a rare breed of scientist who is both a leader in her field and a great writer, but Hope Jahren is both. (She) has built a career and a reputation in science by unearthing secrets hidden in fossilized plant life. Her work has resulted in at least 70 studies in dozens of journals, but it’s also given her a platform—a megaphone, really—to talk about something else: widespread sexual harassment and discrimination in science. On her blog, in op-eds and in her new memoir, Lab Girl, which debuted on the New York Times best-seller list, Jahren wields her influence to call out a culture that has caused women to flee the field she so loves. That’s why she does it: she loves science. And whether she’s writing about lab funding, discrimination or deciduous trees, she has a way of making you love it too.”

Lisa Singleton and Shonn Brown (File photo)

Somehow Ros and Luncheon Co-Chairs Shonn Brown and Lisa Singleton have managed to get Hope to make time in her busy schedule to be the keynoter at the Foundation’s principal fundraiser on Friday, October 20, at the Hilton Anatole.

According to Ros, ““We have a proud history of presenting great thought leaders and doers of our time as the keynote speakers for our annual luncheon. Dr. Jahren is no exception. She is a brilliant scientist whose achievements as a paleobiologist are rivaled by her achievements as an author and advocate for gender equity in science. Having experienced firsthand the challenges of gender bias, she is dedicated to using her voice and her story to encourage more women to pursue and achieve success in the sciences.  Dr. Jahren is widely acknowledged as a strong woman using her exceptional talents to make a better world for all women and girls.”

Even before the news got out, the following sponsors were on board:

  • Platinum sponsor — U.S. Trust
  • Speaker sponsor — Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt
  • Emerald sponsors — AT&T, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert and Toyota
  • Gold sponsor — Phyllis Bernstein
  • Silver sponsors — Veree Brown, Melissa Fetter, Freeman, Cecilia and Tim Norwood and Julia Simon

Get your place reserved now, so you can impress your friends with the fact that you’re lunching with one of Time’s most influential people. Individual tickets and sponsorships are available here!

* Photo credit: Ressler Photography

On Mother’s Day A Box Of Chocolates Is Nice, But A Piece Of Jewelry Would Be Sweeter For More Than Just Your Mum

Kendra Scott Gives Back Party*

Mother’s Day is up ahead. Of course, brunch is a must on Sunday, but what about a little “trinket” to commemorate the occasion? Jeweler designer Kendra Scott and Children’s Medical Center Foundation may just have the sparkle to add to the lady of the day.

On Wednesday, May 10, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., the six area Kendra Scotts will host a Kendra Gives Back Party with a three-fer. The three parts are you not only can purchase “a beautiful piece of jewelry,” but 20% of every sale will benefit Children’s Health and if your “purchase ads up to more than $100, you’ll be entered to win a piece from the new Summer Collection.

Seriously, wouldn’t a little bling be so much better than a box of chocolates or a toaster? Plus, your gift will benefit mothers with children at Children’s.

* Graphic courtesy of Children's Medical Center Foundation

With Pens In Hand, Celebrating Women Luncheon Committee Members Continued The Battle Against Breast Cancer

Around Michal and Lloyd Powell’s dining room table a group of women gathered early on Wednesday, April 5. It wasn’t a gloves-and-hats tea party, nor a brunch. It was a roll-up-the-sleeves session to tackle stacks of letters being sent to friends about the Baylor Health Care System Foundation‘s Celebrating Women Luncheon at the Hilton Anatole on Thursday, October 26.

The news about keynote speaker Jamie Lee Curtis had been officially announced at Luncheon Honorary Co-Chairs Peggy and Leonard Riggs’ home the month before.

Margo Goodwin

Pam McCallum

Ola Fojtasek

But today was the putting of pen to paper. Of the group including Luncheon Chair Tucker Enthoven, Underwriting Chair Ola Fojtasek, Lindalyn Adams, Debbie Oates, Margo Goodwin, Pam McCallum, Barbara Stewart and Tucker’s mom Julie Ford around the table, a headcount was asked about how many had actually had breast cancer. Only one or two raised their hands. When asked how many had had a friend or relative hit by breast cancer, the hands dropped their pens and rose around the table.

But thanks to the research and developments in treating breast cancer at Baylor Scott & White as a result of the $28M raised from the 17 years of the luncheon, these ladies were bound and determined to raise much more money for the fear of breast cancer hitting their families or anyone for that matter.

The rest of the day and the following one, more women would arrive at the Powells’ dining table to send the word that cancer can be beaten.

The letters dropped late last week, so if your letter has gone the route of Mars, contact the Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s Christina Goodman at 214.820.4408

2017 Junior Cattle Barons Ball Celebrants Created Pillow Artwork Before Attending Disney On Ice At American Airlines Center

As the princesses and princes lined up at American Airlines Center for the Disney on Ice performance on Sunday, March 19, there was a VIP gathering already underway at AAC’s Jack Daniels Old No. 7 Club for the ultimate royals. They were the kids from Children’s Health and Children’s Medical Center who had locked horns with the ultimate dragon — cancer.

But they weren’t just there to see the show and get on a sugar high with jelly beans, M&Ms and malt balls as part of the Junior Cattle Baron’s Ball. They were put to work, but it was fun work.  Immediately upon arrival, they picked up the pillow cases provided by Luke’s Fastbreak and were directed to tables to decorate ‘em.

Finished pillow case

Hello? Pillow cases? Instead of past years, when the kiddos got their faces temporarily painted, they got to decorate the pillows for keeps. After all, who wants to sleep on a ho-hum pillow? It was a brilliant addition to the annual pre-show extravaganza at the center. The children and their siblings didn’t hesitate to start decorating. Why, shoot! Some of them were dreamy works with art/heart that couldn’t help but create sweet dreams.

Caroline Corrigan, Rosemary LeBlanc and Sarah Munir

Anne Stodghill and Dash Stodghill

Behind the tables were junior hostesses Caroline Corrigan, Rosemary LeBlanc and Sarah Munir. Despite her tan line, Rosemary reported that she had stayed home for spring break.

CBB Co-Chair Anne Stodghill accompanied by her tousle-hair son Dash Stodghill told how their stay in New Mexico had been spent counting out-of-town license plants for Dash’s third-grade project.

The Williams clan: (from the left) Whitney, Jamie and Craig, Graham, Georgia, Andrew, Derrin, Lanier, Mary and Kate

Merrick Huckin, Debbie Munir, Catherine Jaynes, Juliana LeBlanc and Mary C. Corrigan

Just as the doors opened for the afternoon fun on ice, Moody Foundation Human Resources  Director Jamie Williams arrived with her Williams family (Whitney, Craig, Graham, Georgia, Andrew, Derrin, Lanier, Mary and Kate) in tow. It was thanks to The Moody Foundation that the event took place and also thanks to coordination by CBB-ers Merrick Huckin, Debbie Munir, Catherine Jaynes, Juliana LeBlanc and Mary C. Corrigan.

JUST IN: Peggy And Leonard Riggs To Be 2017 Celebrating Women Luncheon Honorary Co-Chairs

The 2017 Celebrating Women Luncheon kick-off party at Peggy and Leonard Riggs’ home just took place. In addition to confirming that Jamie Lee Curtis will be the speaker at the Thursday, October 26th event at the Hilton Anatole, Luncheon Chair Tucker Enthoven revealed that the honorary co-chairs will be Peggy and Leonard.

Leonard and Peggy Riggs, Jim and Kristen Hinton and Robin Robinson

Also on hand for the presentation were new Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Jim Hinton and his wife Kristen Hinton and Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson.

JUST IN: 2017 Celebrating Women Luncheon Speaker Will Be Multi-Talented Jamie Lee Curtis (aka Lady Haden-Guest)

Ola Fojtasek and Tucker Enthoven (File photo)

After weeks of begging, threatening, cajoling and downright nagging, the 2017 Celebrating Women Luncheon Chair Tucker Enthoven and her Underwriting Chair Ola Fojtasek finally fessed up who would be the featured speaker at Baylor Health Care System Foundation’s 18th annual fundraiser to fight breast cancer.

Tucker and Ola have arranged to have a member of a legendary Hollywood family to be on stage at the Hilton Anatole on Thursday, October 26 — Jamie Lee Curtis. The daughter of the late Janet Leigh and the late Tony Curtis and the wife of “This Is Spinal Tap”’s and “Best In Show”’s Christopher Guest for the past 32 years, she has earned her stripes in acting, writing, inventing, and facing the reality of breast cancer.

Jamie Lee Curtis*

In the film world, she made her debut at the age of 20 in John Carpenter’s “Halloween” and instantly became known as the “scream queen” by following that up with “The Fog,” “Prom Night” and “Terror Train” in 1980 and “Halloween II” and “Roadgames” in 1981. But she spread her acting talents beyond the horror genre by appearing in “Trading Places” in 1983, “A Fish Called Wanda” in 1988, “Blue Steel in 1989, “True Lies” in 1994 and “Freaky Friday” in 2003.

But Jamie Lee’s talents weren’t limited to the big and little screens. With two adopted children (Annie Guest and Thomas Guest), she has written a number of children’s books starting in 1993 with “When I was Little: A Four-Year Old’s Memoir of Her Youth.”

Thanks to motherhood, she was spurred into becoming an inventor. Realizing the challenges of “cleaning up,” she invented “a modification of a diaper with a moisture-proof pocket containing wipes that can be taken out and used with one hand. Curtis refused to allow her invention to be marketed until companies started selling biodegradable diaplors.”

And there’s still more. For instance, she may be known to most folks as Jamie Lee Curtis, but she became Lady Haden-Guest when her husband inherited the Barony of Haden-Guest in 1996.

Rita Wilson (File photo)

However, everything hasn’t been picture perfect. In addition to being the child of divorced parents, having a variety of step-parents and recovering from opiate addiction, she revealed in 2010, “I had my own personal moment of truth 10 years ago when I had a biopsy done on a small, questionable lump in my breast. It was scary… Everything turned out fine, but it brought me very close to understanding how lucky I am to have access to all these resources and great doctors.”

BTW, Jamie Lee is known for being smart, speaking her mind and having a great sense of humor. Translation: This luncheon has all the earmarks of being a perfect follow-up to Rita Wilson’s all-star appearance at last year’s fundraiser. So check out the sponsorship opportunities and tickets availabilities ASAP.

* Photo provided by Baylor Health Care System Foundation

Free Simulcast Of The Dallas Opera’s “Madame Butterfly” At The Star Saturday Night Thanks To The Dallas Foundation

How about a freebie Saturday night that’s a bit off the beaten track? The Dallas Opera’s Saturday evening performance of Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly” at the Winspear will be simulcast free at The Star in Frisco. You know you’ve been curious about the Cowboys new digs and the temperatures are supposed to be in the upper 70s.

Hui He*

While the performance starring soprano Hui He and tenor Gianluca Terranova will start at 7:30 p.m., the evening’s program at The Star will begin at 6 p.m. with KLUV’s Jody Dean and The Dallas Opera’s Education program Senior Manager Kristian Roberts.

And the timing is perfect! Just when you’ve totally run out of things to do with the kids during spring break, there will be such pre-performance activities as the Family Fun Zone from 5 to 7 p.m., trivia, behind-the-scenes interviews and a WB Classics presentation of Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd in “What’s Opera, Doc?

While online registration are already at capacity-load status, walk-ups will be welcomed.

Thank-you notes should be sent to The Dallas Foundation. Why? Because the Foundation is sponsoring the simulcast.

According to The Dallas Foundation President/CEO Mary Jalonick, “The Dallas Foundation has been proud to serve as the Founding Sponsor of The Dallas Opera’s simulcasts at AT&T Stadium since 2012, helping to provide families throughout our community the chance to experience world-class opera in this unique and relaxed setting. This year’s simulcast performance at The Star in Frisco, will offer audiences an opportunity to enjoy one of the most well-known operas in one of our area’s newest event venues.”

BTW, you might want to bring along some hankies for Un Bel Di Vedremo.”

* Photo credit: Karen Almond

A Beacon of Hope Luncheon Introduced Faces Of Hope And Had Glennon Doyle Melton Mix Humor And Honesty About Mental Health

As final preparations were underway on the second floor of the Renaissance Hotel for “A Beacon Of Hope” silent auction and luncheon benefiting the Grant Halliburton Foundation, a VIP reception was taking place on the fourth floor’s City View room on Thursday, February 23.

Foundation President/Founder Vanita Halliburton was surrounded by people whose had been touched by teenagers dealing with mental health issues. She herself had created the foundation due to the suicide of her son Grant Halliburton at the age of 19 in 2005 after years of suffering from depression and bipolar disorder.

Dealing with teen mental health is very difficult issue for a fundraising event. It’s a delicate weaving of the emotional turmoil and hope for helping others overcome such challenges. On this occasion, Vanita was celebrating the launch of a new program — Faces of Hope. As Faces of Hope Chair Barb Farmer explained, the collaboration between the foundation and Gittings was to honor people within the community who “work in diverse ways to promote mental health every day.”

This year’s group of Faces included Suzie and Mike Ayoob, Senior Corporal Herb Cotner, Julie Hersh, Terry Bentley Hill, Patrick LeBlanc, Sylvia Orozco-Joseph, Sierra Sanchez and Priya Singvi.

Sierra Sanchez, Priya Singhvi, Sylvia Orozco-Joseph, Mike and Suzie Ayoob, Terry Bentley Hill, Julie Hersh, Herb Cotner and Patrick LeBlanc

In addition to pieces of crystal being presented to each of the Faces, their portraits were displayed in the lobby on the second floor.

Gittings Faces of Hope portraits

Following the presentation, Vanita had the day’s speaker author/blogger/newly engaged Glennon Doyle Melton briefly talk. Her message was that you can let tragedy drive you forward for the better or let it drive you further down.

Then, right on cue at 10:55, Vanita directed the patrons to the second floor to check the silent auction and buy raffle tickets. On the way down, Barb showed a bracelet that she got from last year’s raffle. It seems her husband bought ten tickets and claimed it was his. Luckily, he gave it to Barb.

Tom Krampitz and Terry Bentley Hill

Hailey Nicholson and Shannon Hollandsworth

The patrons discovered the lobby and ballroom jammed with guests like Tom Krampitz, Shannon Hollandsworth with daughter Hailey Nicholson. Dixey Arterburn was walking through the crowd with a Starbucks cup and a very hoarse throat. Seems she lost her voice at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra League Ball the Saturday before.

Dixey Arteburn and Ginger Sager

Taylor Mohr and Amanda Johnson

Taylor Mohr was with her buddy Amanda Johnson, who lost her sister to suicide resulting in Amanda’s working with others involved in such emotional crisis. Unfortunately, there were many in the audience with similar reason for being there. Luckily, they were there to not just support Grant Halliburton Foundation but each other.

Steve Noviello and Vanita Halliburton

Just past noon, KDFW reporter/emcee Steve Noviello recalled that the first year only 100 people attended the luncheon. Now eight years later there were more than 400. In introducing Vanita, he told how when he first met her in her office, he had remarked about the art on the walls, only to learn that it had been done by Grant.

Vanita told about the Foundation and its purpose to help young people struggling with mental health crises. In the past suicide had been the third leading cause of death among young people from ages 15 to 24. It is now second among those between 10 and 24. In Texas, the average is one suicide per week among young people.

After a break for lunch, Vanita and Glennon took their places in chairs on stage. Less than 30 seconds into the conversation, Glennon’s headset mic wasn’t working. A man hustled to the stage with a handheld. Despite the change of mic, there continued to be rustling noise over the PA. Another handheld was brought to the stage for Vanita. It didn’t seem all that necessary, since Glennon appeared to need no help in sharing her life of bulimia, alcoholism, drug addiction and her personal views.

Glennon Doyle Melton

She got sober when she was 25 after being in addiction for a decade and a half. Then she got married and life was good until her husband told her that he had been unfaithful. Learning that news, she just couldn’t stay in her house, so she headed to her yoga class, where they had her go to a hot yoga room. Upon entering the room, Glennon thought, “What the hell is this?”

When the question was raised about what the yoga members’ intentions were that day, Glennon admitted, “My intention is sit on the mat and not run out of the room.” The results? “It was the hardest 90 minutes of my life.”

While her talk was a mix of self-deprecating humor and brutal honesty, it was definitely not a scripted speech but rather just Glennon just being Glennon. 

But her message was clear — “My entire life is to not to avoid the pain of life.” She also said that as a parent, “It’s not our job to protect our children from pain.”

In closing, she consoled those who had suffered the loss of loved ones to mental illness by saying, “Grief is just the proof of great love.”

New Baylor Scott And White Health President/CEO Jim Hinton Met Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Members At St. V-Day Luncheon

Just outside the dining room at the Charles Sammons Cancer Center, there was a long line of people waiting to meet a Very Important Person when the Baylor Health Care System Foundation board met on Tuesday, February 14. And, why not? The quarterly meeting, after all, marked one of the first public appearances ever by James (“Jim”) Hinton, who’d been tapped to succeed Joel Allison as the president and CEO of Baylor Scott and White Health.

Jim Hinton, Lindalyn Adams and Margo Goodwin*

And, like savvy showmen saving the big act for last, the foundation scheduled Hinton as the final speaker on the 90-minute luncheon program, whose theme was, “Radiologists: Master Interpreters in Diagnosing and Monitoring Disease.” With board members including Barry Andrews, Lisa Troutt, Ray Washburne, Pryor Blackwell, Ron Steinhart, Jill Smith, Richard Holt, Aileen Pratt, Michal Powell and Steve Leiberman in attendance, Board Chair Margo Goodwin kicked off the meeting by urging the members to “up” their giving, in order to reach 100% by the next quarterly get-together.

Michal Powell, Robin Robinson and Aileen Pratt*

Pryor Blackwell*

Jill Smith*

“We’re at 67% participation now,” she said. “We’ve been at 100 percent for each of the last four years, and I hope we won’t break that spell.” Margo also encouraged gifts to the American Cancer Society’s Hope Lodge, which selected Baylor University Medical Center as the site of its newest facility. Hope Lodge Dallas will offer free accommodations for cancer patients who have to travel long distances for their care.

Margo gave way at that point to Foundation President Rowland Robinson, who noted the recent deaths of three strong foundation supporters: former Zale Corp. Vice Chairman Leo Fields, former Baylor liver-transplant recipient Ginny Sellers, and Tommy Valenta, a former top executive with Chaparral Steel Co. and Texas Industries.

Greg dePrisco*

With that, Robin talked a little about the meeting’s focus on radiology—“the last link in the diagnostic chain,” he called it—before introducing featured speaker Gregory dePrisco, M.D., a diagnostic radiologist and director of the MRI Fellowship Program at Baylor University Medical Center. During his fascinating and sometimes-humorous presentation, Greg explained that a radiologist is a “doctor’s doctor,” and that 1.2% of all doctors are radiologists.

He recalled the specialty’s history, from the discovery of X-rays through the widespread use of CT scans and MRIs. He told about his membership on an “anal/rectal task force” and showed and explained a number of MRIs, including an MRI comparison between a 40-year-old woman who presented normally (the subject was actually his wife, Dr. Michelle Nichols, who was in the audience) and another woman with rectal pathology and a prolapsed uterus. 

Greg also recalled how he had personally suffered a stroke; was misdiagnosed at another local medical center, where the paramedics took him; and then recovered after receiving the correct diagnosis. (Greg had “something in my lung” that caused the stroke, he explained.) The radiologist ended his presentation by showing CT images of a colonoscopy, a mammogram, and a cancerous lung, before concluding with this observation: “Radiology is a strong link in the healthcare chain. I did go over my time a little bit, but the [story about my] stroke slowed me down!”

Jim Hinton*

Then it was time for Jim to end the program with some brief closing remarks. He took the reins at Baylor Scott And White Health in January, after serving for years as president and CEO of Presbyterian Healthcare Services in New Mexico, that state’s largest healthcare provider.

“It’s good to be in Texas,” Jim told the board members. “Typically in February I’m around a lot of Texans—but in the [ski] lift line at Taos. I wasn’t looking for a job when this one came around. But [Baylor’s] reputation and the opportunity to live in a community like Dallas were too much to pass up.”

The foundation’s fundraising efforts are crucial, Jim said finally, because “there’s not enough money in patient-care revenue” to support the Baylor healthcare system’s world-class work.

* Photo credit: Lara Bierner

JUST IN: Big Thought’s Gigi Antoni Is Heading To The Big Apple As Director Of Learning And Enrichment For The Wallace Foundation

Gigi Antoni (File photo)

Boxes of Puffs are being passed around over at Big Thought. The reason is the staff was just notified that after 20 years with the nonprofit, Big Thought President/CEO Gigi Antoni will be leaving the education organization in April. The reason is that she is moving to New York City to join The Wallace Foundation as the director of learning and enrichment.  

The Foundation’s mission “is to foster improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone.”

Will Miller (File photo)

It was back in December 2015 that a presentation was made to a small group of area leaders addressing the problem of the Dallas education system going dormant during the summer. The research was culminated by The Wallace Foundation, the Urban Institute Policy Group and Big Thought. According to The Wallace Foundation President Will Miller, this type of situation was the reason the Foundation had spent $23M in the past decade to address such issues.

For a full release on the news, follow the jump. [Read more…]

The Family Place’s Legacy Campaign Is Within A Whisker Of Achieving Its $16.5M Goal And Needs Help To Close The Books

Paige Flink (File photo)

Was it really back on October 2015 that The Family Place’s Paige Flink announce The Family Place Legacy Campaign — Building For the Future — to build a 40,000-square foot Central Dallas Counseling Center? Her goal for the capital campaign was a whopping $13M. To get things rolling, The Moody Foundation kicked in $5M that resulted in the facility being named “Ann Moody Place.”

While the physical process of groundbreaking and building has been underway, so has the effort because the goal increased to $16.5M with good reason. According to Paige, the center is going to provide such services and offerings to “help us meet the burgeoning demand for our services. Every year there are approximately 15,000 incidents of family violence reported to the Dallas Police Department. The Family Place, which is the largest family violence shelter in our community and one of the largest service providers in Texas, shelters over 1,000 victims a year at our Safe Campus with 108 beds plus cribs. Our existing shelter is regularly full. The new facility will allow us to shelter an additional 45 women and children each night. It will also house our expanded Central Dallas counseling services for victims and their children, and a medical and dental clinic for clients.”

Ann Moody Place rendering*

To accommodate those needs, Paige and her crew recognized from experience some of the reasons people in need don’t seek help. For instance, “studies show that up to 65% of domestic violence victims are unable to escape their abusers because they are concerned about what will happen to their pets when they leave.”

Pets won’t be left behind

To ease those concerns, Ann Moody Place will have five dog kennels, five cat towers, a cuddle room where clients can visit their animals plus a dog run. Thanks to a partnership with the SPCA of Texas, a vet-tech will make sure all animals are vaccinated and care for.

But as the Monday, May 1st move-in date approaches, $220,000 is still needed to complete the fundraising. As a greater incentive to donate ASAP, Highland Capital Management has provided a $1M-challenge. For every dollar raised by Tuesday, April 4, Highland will provide 50 cents.

So, perhaps your budget can’t quite muster up a hundred thousand or two. Not to worry. There are other opportunities like

  • $500 for a 6” by 12” engraved brick
  • $1,000 for a donor to have his/her/their name(s) etched in a beautiful display in the breezeway connecting the two new buildings.
  • $7,500 for each of the two remaining outdoor seating areas in the healing garden

And wouldn’t you know that the dog kennels have all been underwritten, but the poor cats are playing second fiddle and are in need of $10,000-naming rights for each of the two remaining cat towers.

Of course, Paige has other underwriting opportunities. Why she just might arrange to have your name tattooed on her shoulder for the right price.  

* Graphic courtesy of The Family Place