MySweetWishList: 2018 Genesis Young Leaders Masquerade Ball

According to 2018 Genesis Young Leaders Masquerade Ball Co-Chairs Kirstin and Holden Godat and Sarah and Hayden Godat,

Hayden and Sarah Godat and Kirstin and Holden Godat*

“This holiday season, our wish is for women and men across Dallas to help end domestic violence by purchasing tickets to attend the 2018 black-tie Genesis Young Leaders Masquerade Ball. Our goal is to raise $200,000 for Genesis Women’s Shelter and Support, an organization that provides safety, shelter and support to women and children fleeing abuse.

“The fifth annual Genesis Young Leaders Masquerade Ball will be held at 8 p.m. on Saturday, February 17, at the hit event venue Sixty Five Hundred. Hundreds of young professionals will come together to raise funds and awareness for Genesis Women’s Shelter while treating themselves to a formal night out. 

Genesis Women’s Shelter and Support*

“The evening promises to be one to remember, with live entertainment, casino games and a silent auction you won’t want to miss. Whether you make plans for a date night or a night out with friends, make sure to mark February 17 on your calendar. Last year’s Masquerade was a sold-out event, so get your tickets quickly. Tickets and more information can be found here.

Have a magical holiday season, and we can’t wait to see you on February 17!

“Questions? Contact Amy Norton at 214.389.7705 or [email protected].org.”

-By Kirstin and Holden Godat and Sarah and Hayden Godat, 2018 Genesis Young Leaders Masquerade Ball co-chairs

* Graphic and photo provided by Genesis Women’s Shelter and Support

Mirages, Mind Tricks, ‘Intrigue’ And Sticky Fingers Marked The Perot’s Annual Night At the Museum Fundraiser

Tania Boughton, the Texas legislative chair for Childhood Obesity Prevention, said someone advised her to attend “Intrigue,” the Perot Museum’s Night at the Museum fundraiser on Saturday, November 11, because she would see some “very important people” there. She’s glad she did, Tania said, because in no time at all she was meeting and chatting with guests like Diane and Hal Brierley.

Tania Boughton and Hal and Diane Brierley

Like Karen Katz and others, Hal was suffering from a case of “sticky fingers” at the annual gala for the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. No, he wasn’t spotted lifting rocks from the Lyda Hill gem room. Instead, he’d just come from the VIP party, where guests including Margot and Ross Perot, Lyda herself, Thomas Surgent, Gail and Jim Spann, Nina and Trevor Tollett, Linda and Ken Wimberly and Sally and Forrest Hoglund were offered “printed photo cocktails” (it was the cocktails that gave rise to the sticky fingers) from the SipMi’ company.

Sally and Forrest Hoglund

To make these special drinks, photographers “shot” the guest, then sent his or her image electronically to the SipMi’ team, which printed out the image on SipMi’s trademark foam, which was then placed on top of the guest’s cocktail. The image stayed perfectly intact, even while the drink was being sipped.

As many as 1,000 partygoers showed up for Intrigue, which showcased “an evening of illusion, magic and mystery,” as per the amazing SipMi’ drinks.

Mirrored performers

The fun had begun outside on the plaza, where guests like Lynn McBee (hubby Allan was indisposed that night), Katherine and Eric Reeves, Russell Holloway, Lee Jamison, and Amy and Michael Meadows entered the museum through a human maze amid music, lights, and models dressed in mirror-covered body suits.

Once inside, they could sample the likes of “Confidentiality” (you had to see the Poirot Crime Lab to believe it) on Level 2, “Natural Curiosities” such as Chemical Caviar and Baffling Botany on Level 3, and the Art of Deception (think 3D holograms and optical illusions) on Level 4.

As they navigated the various floors, the guests enjoyed such fare as a “squid ink” pasta station, mirror-glazed cake bites, “cassoulet” on grilled focaccia with duck confit, and a gravity-separated centrifuge station featuring carbonated mission fig “beer” with lime.

Heather Sauber and Julie Burns

Spotted enjoying the unique fare were Heather Sauber and Julie Burns, who were excitedly checking everything out—for good reason. In April, they’ll be co-producing a gala for Trammell S. Crow‘s Earthx Expo at the Perot, complete with a “green carpet.”

To wrap up The Night at the Museum fundraiser, the Taylor Pace Orchestra played for the after-party, where women traded in their stilettos for more comfortable flats at a shoe check-in.

Hernan J.F. Saenz III and Linda Abraham-Silver

Chairs for Intrigue were Sylvia E. Cespedes, Hernan J.F. Saenz III, and Meredith and Mark Plunkett, while Sharon and Kip Tindell were the honorary co-chairs.

Pausing for a moment between greeting guests at the VIP pre- festivities in the Moody Family Children’s Museum, Saenz—who’s also the museum’s board chair—and Dr. Linda Abraham-Silver, the Perot’s CEO, described their new effort to “redefine what a museum means in the 21st century.” Among their tentative plans for the Perot: more investment in gems and minerals, a new lecture series, and a more aggressive outreach to children in south and east Dallas. All very intriguing, just like the party.  

Legendary B.J. Thomas Took The Stage For Northwood Woman’s Club’s Annual Kaleidoscope Fundraiser At Intercontinental Hotel

While the rest of North Texas was resting after a morning of runs/walks on Saturday, October 28, the Northwood Woman’s Club was in overdrive at the Intercontinental Hotel for its annual Kaleidoscope 2017 “Believe in Love” fundraiser. In addition to having The Triumphs on stage, the star of the night was the legendary B.J. Thomas. Here’s a report from the field that was delayed due to a MySweetCharity elf’s being asleep at the wheel: 

No raindrops fell Saturday, October 28, on the Northwood Woman’s Club Kaleidoscope 2017 “Believe in Love” Gala at the Intercontinental Hotel. The only raindrops at the event came later in the evening in a song when music legend B.J. Thomas took the stage and sang his Grammy winning hit “Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head.”

Upon arrival, guests mingled and explored the silent auction items and wine pull. As guests moved to their tables for dinner, they viewed a slide show featuring the beneficiaries of the event—Attitudes and Attire, Callier Center for Communication Disorders at UTD, Cristo Rey Dallas, Dallas CASA, Interfaith Family Services, St. Simon’s After-School, and NWC Scholarship Fund at Communities Foundation of Texas.

Gala chair Leslie Apgar welcomed guests into dinner as the band The Triumphs took the stage to play during dinner. The Triumphs, the original band that recorded with B.J. Thomas, added a touch of nostalgia to the evening with their familiar hits from the sixties and seventies.

Sharyl Weber, Patricia Kay Dube and Vaughn Gross*

To start the evening’s program NWC President Patricia Kay Dube welcomed everyone and thanked them for supporting the event. She then turned the program over to Master of Ceremonies and Auctioneer Dean McCurry, who recognized guests from each of the beneficiary organizations, including Dallas CASA President and Executive Director Kathleen LaValle and St. Simon’s After School Executive Director Maria Vizzo.

To start the live auction, Dean urged the crowd to “bid up” on a variety of live auction items. He kept the bidding lively for hot sports items such as a Cowboys game experience that includes tickets in a suite and on field passes, and a suite at a Mavericks game for twelve people. Travel items up for auction included a vacation home in Breckenridge, Colorado and a stay at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel in Hawaii. The live auction concluded with a trip to New York in December to see the Billy Joel concert, and this item generated so many bids that several additional trips were awarded to bidders.

B.J. Thomas*

Ready for the featured entertainment of the evening by five-time Grammy winner B.J. Thomas, the crowd enthusiastically welcomed B.J. to the stage and filled the dance floor to sing along and dance as he performed his many hit songs, including “Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head”, “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry”, “Hooked on a Feeling” and many others.

The Triumphs closed out the evening with more music and dancing.

The best part of the evening was the success of the event in raising funds for NWC’s beneficiaries and scholarship fund.

* Photo provided by Northwood Woman's Club

Jubilee Park And Community Center Celebrated Its 20th Birthday With Balloons, Cakes, Cannon Confetti And Some Off-Scripted Moments

The Omni was the site of two groups that split centuries ago on Saturday, November 4. In the Dallas Ballroom, a largely Catholic contingency rallied for 2017 St. Jude Evening Under The Stars. Just a hallway way in the Trinity Ballroom, the Jubilee Park and Community Center’s 20th anniversary “Celebrate Love Dream” was being celebrated with a large number of Jubilee’s founding partners, St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church.

But both groups faced a common challenge. It was in the bathrooms. Despite the best efforts, people emerged from the restrooms with soapy hands. It seems that the sensor-detecting faucets in the lavatories were playing hard to get. One woman, upon seeing another guest failing to find water at any of the six basins, buddied up and held two fingers against the sensors, resulting in flowing water. The soaped-up guest’s wasn’t very quick. By the time she put her hands under the faucet, the water had stopped. The two women partnered up; while one blocked the sensor, the other finally got the now sticky soap off. Gents reported a similar situation in their lavatory.

Anne and Bill Johnson

Ken Malcolmson and Stacey Paddock Malcolmson

But the soapy challenge was soon forgotten as the partying commenced. Before even entering the cocktail party in the ballroom’s lobby, arriving guests saw hundreds of colorful ribbons hanging from equally colorful balloons hovering overhead.

As the 800 members of the Jubilee black-tie set like Marla and Evening Emcee Tony Briggle, Brent Christopher, Anne and Bill Johnson, Stacey Paddock Malcolmson and Ken Malcolmson, Heather Furniss, Delilah and Sam Boyd and Amanda and Price Johnson cocktailed, chatted and made great use of MirMir in the lobby, Event Co-Chair Lydia Addy was in the ballroom going over last-minute details.

Delilah Boyd and Price and Amanda Johnson

Heather Furniss

Lydia Addy

The room was like a mega birthday event, with a mammoth chandelier of huge balloons, party games like “Pin the Tail on the Donkey” and “Putt Putt” in the corners of the room, and a 12-foot-high, multi-layered birthday cake in the center of the dance floor.

Birthday cakes

On each table was a cake topped with electric candles. The confections looked good enough to eat, and guests would soon learn that they were, indeed. Despite looking like faux cakes, they actually were chocolate and vanilla, double-layer cakes.

Organizers had planned to run a tight program, with each speaker limited to two minutes. But as speakers with the best of intentions addressed the crowd, they said those infamous words that give event planners conniption fits — “I’m going to go off script.” It started when Rev. Mark Anschutz, who was to provide the invocation, told the audience that they should have known better than to give a minister the mic. His two minutes ended up being a lengthy thank you to individuals who had worked over the years to make Jubilee happen. That opened the floodgates, with Lydia and her Co-Chair/husband Bill Addy also expanding upon their two minutes in making their remarks. One behind the scenes person said that Jubilee CEO Ben Leal would stay on script, only to hear Ben tiptoe off script, too.

Ben Leal

But seriously, who could blame them if they wanted to thank everyone involved in the success of the southwest Dallas oasis? Since 1997, Jubilee Park has strengthened the 62-block community in southeast Dallas based on the five pillars of education, affordable housing, public health, public safety and economic development for both children and adults. As Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings noted of Jubilee Park and its supporters in addressing the crowd: “This marks the best of Dallas.” Not to mention that, instead of hitting the goal of $1.3M, the event had brought in more than $1.4M!

Ann and Bob Dyer, Guy and Louise Griffeth and Les and Linda Secrest

In between the speakers, salads were followed by chewy short ribs. Servers removed the centerpieces and returned minutes later with slices of the cake on plates and flutes of champagne. Ben invited all who had had any part of Jubilee to come to the dance floor to toast the occasion. With the dance floor filled, the rest of the guests, like Louise and Guy Griffeth, Linda and Les Secrest, Ann and Bob Dyer and Ken Schnitzer, stood in their places to join the birthday toast and sing “Happy Birthday.” With that, a confetti canon showered the room with paper.

Confetti Cannon

Then, to keep the action going, Emerald City quickly followed to transform the dance of toasters to dancers with glow sticks.

With Stars And Stetsons Overhead, The Spirit Of Taos Was Picture Perfect At The Lot With Downtown Fever And A Miniature Burro

Once again an almost perfect moon shone over The Lot for The Wilkinson Center’s Spirit of Taos on Friday, November 3.

There was no need to explain the attire for the evening. It was strictly jeans, squash blossom necklaces and bracelets decked out in turquoise, crushable Stetsons, perfect smiles and not a suit in sight.

Thanks to a perfect night and Co-Chairs AC Contreras, Lauren Cavenaghi, Caitlin Morris Hyatt and Meridith Myers Zidell, the crowd filled the beer garden as everything from mariachis to Emerald City’s Downtown Fever played. Inside was the silent auction. But, of course, the hit of the night was split between the photo booth and the miniature burro.

Ross and Sally Taylor, Anthony Contreras, Daniella Giglio, Larry Giglio and Krystin and Nick Gerlach

Looking over the crowd of 300+ including Daniella Giglio, Larry Giglio, Leslie and Bryan Diers, Krystin and Nick Gerlach, Sally and Ross Taylor, Sarah Matlock, Sloan Milton, Lauren Schneider, Lindsay Morris, Carolyn Daniel, Ashlea Bennett, Natalie Patten, Amy Ridings, Justin James, John James, Laura Munoz, Karrie Cato, Pam Karlos, Roxann Staff, Sydney Menefee, Crystal and Jarrett Woods, Natalie Nihil Roberto, Tara Versfelt, Ann Damele, Caly Allen-Martin, Katy Lopez, Gable Roby, Kate and Will Walters and Lara and Jesse Smith, Wilkinson Center Executive Director Anne Reeder admitted that the night’s fundraiser was a real draw for the upcoming generation.

Anne Reeder and Sarah Matlock

Marsha and Craig Innes

While 60-somethings Marsha and Craig Innes initially felt like they were chaperoning, that was not the case as they soon started hanging out with the under-35 types. Marsha told how she had recently joined her Tri Delt sisters in Fort Worth for their 50-year pins. She admitted that it may have sounded “cheesy,” but it was a moment that she treasured.

Pretty soon all ages settled down at the picnic tables with cactus centerpieces for dining and talking.

18th Annual Mission Ole Guests Got All Painted Up To Raise Funds For Trinity River Mission At Chicken Scratch And The Foundry

That first wave of winter chill really hit North Texas on Saturday, October 28. But thousands still rallied for area walks/runs in the morning. By evening the brisk temperatures had nonprofits pulling portable heaters out of storage and guests releasing their furs, cashmeres and leathers from closets.

The Trinity River Mission’s 18th Annual Mission Ole held forth in jeans, boots, cowboy hats and day of the dead painted faces at Chicken Scratch.

Margaret Spelling

Ann Kellogg Schooler and Matt Schooler

Lisa Cooley, Cindy Turner, Gail Fischer and John Corder

Earlier in the day, Mission Ole C0Chairs Ann Kellogg Schooler and Margaret Spelling and Advisor Extraordinaire Cindy Turner had a tent installed over the outdoor picnic tables and stage just in case the rain continued. There was no need. The rain had stopped and the reception took place in the open area around the fire pit and near the portable heaters. For those in need of greater heat, there was the shed with the silent auction items and the never-ending buffet.

Ciara Cooley and Katekyn Fletcher

Clay Cooley and Aaron McWhorter

Hillary Turner and Chris Calandro

Tanya McDonald and Paige McDaniel

As guests like Honorary Co-Chairs Lisa and Clay Cooley, Ciara Cooley with Chi O sister Katekyn Fletcher, Tanya McDonald, Paige McDaniel, Carole and Scott Murray, Hilary Turner, Chris Calandro and Luanne McWhorter arrived, mariachis and painted faced models proved the perfect selfie backdrops.

Mission Ole models

Yatzil Rubin and Thomas Surgent

Web Pierce

Lesley Lanahan

Lauren Thedfor

Face artist at work

While some guests like Yatzil Rubin, Thomas Surgent, Lauren Thedford and Webb Pierce arrived with faces ready made, others like Lesley and Michael Lanahan and Matt Schooler got in line to have customized painted faces.

Charles Haley

Honorary Chair Gail Fischer arrived late in the night. Husband Cliff Fischer was in India on business. As for Gail, she had a couple of reason for the delayed arrival. First the electricity in the family digs had gone out. Just as Gail had set up lit candles to see her way around, the electricity came back on. Then she took a wrong turn on her way to Chicken Scratch resulting in her heading to Fort Worth.

An hour into the event Gail arrived and immediately set about locating longtime Fischer bud Charles Haley. Someone told her that he had arrived early and left. But, no. Gail spotted the tall former Dallas Cowboy surrounded by fans and friends at the far end of the shed. She also laughed that another guests was also sporting the same black shirt with day-of-the-dead accents that her brother John Corder was wearing.

Other points of interests included Sunie Solomon reporting that monies were still being counted for the week-before Cattle Baron’s Ball; Greg Nieberding and Eddie Ortega telling how the night before they had hosted the past chairs and president of the Junior League of Dallas; rancher Aaron McWhorter preparing to head to Las Vegas with some of his bulls for the bull riding competition.

Steve and Sunie Solmon

Greg Nieberding and Eddie Ortega

For more looks are the faces in the crowd, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: 18th Annual Mission Ole

Lesley Lanahan, Matt Schooler and Ann Kellogg Schooler and Michael Lanahan

Despite the ghoulish faces and the chill in the air, the Trinity River Mission’s 18th Annual Mission Ole at Chicken Scratch and The Foundry was festive, fun and fundraising on Saturday, October 28. With the fire pit blazing and portable heater blowing, the cold factor was nihil. But at times it was hard to know just who was behind the painted faces. Why the face painters were busier than NorthPark Neiman’s cosmetic counter on a Saturday afternoon!

Web Pierce

Yatzil Rubin and Thomas Surgent

While the post is being finished, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Despite Ma Nature’s Threatening With Weather Woes, Cattle Baron’s Ball “Shot For The Stars” With Paddles Waving And Guests Partying

Las Vegas oddsmakers thought they had all their bets covered on Saturday, October 21. The Astros were facing off against the Yankees in the 2017 American League playoffs, and the 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball was facing incredible odds to raise bunches of money for cancer research.

While the Astros won the pennant in Houston and prepared to meet  the L.A .Dodgers in the World Series, the CBB-ers were also rising to the occasion at Gilley’s Dallas. With all types of ugly weather once again threatening to create a Debbie Downer predicament, CBB Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill prepared for battle, making Eisenhower’s D-Day playbook look loosey-goosey.

Steve and Anne Stodghill and Sunie and Steve Solomon

The layout had been redesigned from past CBB gatherings at Gilley’s to address any possible stormy outburst. And as the days got closer and a norther started ambling its way southward, tents sprung up like bluebonnets in spring. Even the brief crosswalk between Gilley’s proper and the football stadium-size tent for the Brooks and Dunn concert was encased. Only the Ferris wheel lay bare.

Ferris wheel

But then, the Baronesses were old hands at dealing with Ma Nature, and Sunie, Anne and their committee members were prepared to take the old wet gal on. One longtime CBB vet was amazed at how seamless the evening went. The POA was created to be flexible, just in case an “Oops!” situation arose. And it did—but more about that later.

While the very fashionable types sported everything from suede skirts to custom boots, the accessory du jour was made of paper. No matter the amount of turquoise worn, it was the color of a guest’s wristband that established their pecking order. Talk about a caste system! It not only determined when and where a guest could venture, but it also reflected your exact ranking of table assignments at the Brooks and Dunn concert—if you scored the limited meet-and-greet with the duo.

Alison and Mike Malone and Hallie Lawrence

John Buchanan and Ken Paxton

Dwight and Claire Emanuelson

Andrea Weber, Mary Parker and Olivia Kearney

Rhonda and Fraser Marcus

Barbara and Don Daseke

Stubbs and Holly Davis and Kent Rathbun

Phil White and Danice Couch

Alex Laurenzi

Tom and Amy Hughes and Pam and Vin Perella

As guests like Ken Paxton (who was attending his first Cattle Baron’s in six or seven years), Claire and Dwight Emanuelson, Pam and Vince Perella, Rhonda and Fraser Marcus, Angela Nash with Billy Martin Jr., Lisa and Marvin Singleton, Olivia and Jeff Kearney, Barbara and Don Daseke, Bethany and Stephen Holloway and past CCB chairs (Olivia Kearney, Jennifer Dix, Cindy Stager, Mary Martha Pickens, Mary Parker, Amy Turner, Katherine Wynne, Tia Wynne, Kristen Sanger and Brooke Shelby) partied in the main ballroom, some super VIPers waited for their meet-and-greet time with Winston and Strawn Live Auction entertainer Pat Green.

Among them: Co-chair Husbands Steve Solomon and Steve Stodghill, longtime friends who passed the time bantering about their outfits (Stodghill bought his tricked-out C&W jacket at Manuel’s in Nashville, it seems, while Solomon joked that he got his duds at Neiman’s). Stodg also revealed that his Winston and Strawn law-firm pals had bought five tables for the big party.  

Terra Najork

Steve Lamb, Pat Green and Deborah Ferguson

Katie Layton, Megan O’Leary, Paige Westhoff, Andrea Nayfa, Pat Green, Diana Hamilton, Terra Najork, Katy Bock, Nancy Gopez

That’s when the “oops” happened. As it turned out, the Pat Green meet-and-greeters waited … and waited … and waited. Seems that Pat had gotten a late start and then had been stuck in traffic. Not to worry, though. Food and beverages were brought in, creating a mini-party, as calls were made checking on Pat’s progress. Once he finally appeared, though, things went perfectly, with Green apologizing to each of the guests as their photos were taken. “It was the craziest thing in the world, trying to get here,” he explained to anyone who would listen. Who couldn’t forgive the baby-faced blonde? In the meantime, Pat’s wife, jewelry designer Kori Green, made her way to Jacqueline Cavender’s table for the performance leading up to the live auction, which would have a different feel tonight.  

Jacqueline Cavender and Kori Green

Pat Green and Steve Stodghill

As the two Co-Chair Hubby Steves introduced Pat to the audience, Pat came up behind Stodgie and wrapped his arms around the attorney. At points throughout his performance, Pat managed to not only play his guitar and sing, but to pose for selfies with loving admirers on the floor. He also chided the crowd at one point: “It’s Saturday night, and you don’t have to apologize until tomorrow. You all sure are quiet Christians! I guess for the Brooks and Dunn show, you’re gonna be hammered!” Pat even spied his Cavendar pals and thanked them for supplying his evening’s entire wardrobe—right down to his undies.

Kevin Kuykendall

Annika Cail

Elizabeth Tripplehorn-Laurenzi

No sooner had Pat left the stage than it was time for the live auction to get underway. Some longtime observers were concerned. After all, stalwart paddle-hoisters like Nancy Rogers, Diane and Hal Brierley and Lisa and Clay Cooley were MIA, due to out-of-town ventures and other commitments. Not to worry. Such names as Wagner, Kuykendall, Fischer, Turner and Maguire not only filled the void, they raised eyebrows. One CBB vet stood in amazement as uber-bidding took place.

An auction package of a trip to Umbria and Florence to create custom porcelain place settings for 16, plus dinner afterwards at Truluck’s Dallas for 20, was won by Sabrina and Kevin Kuykendall for $100,000.

Kevin and Sabrina Kuykendall

Gail and Cliff Fischer

When the poker game with former Dallas Cowboys went up for bid, Cliff Fischer put on his best poker face, waved off auctioneers and watched the bidding proceed. He had snapped it up last year for $100,000 and was playing hard-to-get. Just as the bids slowed to a standstill, Cliff raised his paddle to snap it up for $75,000.

Cary Maguire wheeled up to the Deason table on the front row with his posse just long enough to have the last paddle standing for the Las Vegas package that included a concert with Reba McIntire and Brooks and Dunn for $50,000. No sooner had he signed on the dotted line than the Maguire entourage was gone.

Steve Stodghill and Todd Wagner

Amy Turner

Todd Wagner took home the Indie package for $41,000 and Amy Turner picked up the Chefs’ dinner for a nice round figure.  

A last-minute add was artwork by Ronnie Dunn, who appeared on stage to discuss his artistic venture. Art-loving Steve Stodghill couldn’t resist and snapped up Ronnie’s piece for $14,000.

Like clockwork, the live auction ended and the thousands headed to the big tent. For a handful of super-duper VIPs, it was backstage then for the meet-and-greet with Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn. As per the routine of most grip-and-grins, guests are photographed sans purses and other distractions.

Ronnie Dunn, Anne Stodghill, Sunie Solomon, Kix Brooks and Steve Solomon

But on this occasion, there were the exceptions. Barry Andrews proudly hoisted a Miller Lite. Who could blame the Miller distributor, who had once again sponsored the Miller Distributing Main Stage presented by Miller Lite?

Mike McGuire, Ronnie Dunn, Sophie McGuire, Natalie McGuire, Barry and Lana Andrews and Kix Brooks

Ronnie Dunn, Kinky Friedman, Nicole Barrett and Kix Brooks

And then there was this one fella who couldn’t be separated from his stogie. His name was Richard Friedman, but he’s more commonly known as Kinky Friedman. Perhaps he hadn’t been told that the fundraiser was benefiting the American Cancer Society?

Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn

No sooner had the photo session ended than it was time for Sunie and Anne to greet the more than 3,000 guests from the stage, announce the winners of the raffle, and get the concert underway with salutes to the military. And, what a concert it was! As two-steppers flocked to the front of the stage, Brooks and Dunn pumped out hit after hit: “Brand New Man,” “Red Dirt Road,” “Lost and Found,” “Play Something Country,” “Neon Moon,” “Cowgirls Don’t Cry,” “Husbands and Wives,” “My Next Broken Heart.” Suffice to say, the big crowd got their money’s worth—and more. 

In the distance, meantime, Mother Nature was holding off. She was either was on her best behavior, or flat scared that Steve Stodghill would sue her for tortious interference. Regardless, as if perfectly planned, the heavens opened up and the rain started pouring down just as the final shuttles were hauling guests back to their cars at 2 a.m.

Yup, this year the CBBers had a game plan ready to take on all challenges. And the plan worked out just beautifully.

For a look at the festivities, check out the 90 pictures at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball

Mother Nature threatened to put a real crimp in the 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball at Gilley’s on Saturday, October 21. She had done it before and she was predicted to do an encore with rain, lightning and all types of frightening stuff.

Steve and Anne Stodghill and Sunie and Steve Solomon

Co-Chairs Anne Stodghill and Sunie Solomon and their crackerjack team of baronesses were ready for whatever the old gal threw at them. Everything but the Ferris wheel was covered.

Kevin Kuykendall

And talk about the live auction. There were a lot of arms reaching for the ceiling as the bids impressed even longtime vets.

And wouldn’t you know. They even managed to talk Ma Nature into holding off her pity party puddles until the after-party was over.

Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn

While the post is being finalized, there are dozens and dozens and dozens of pictures over at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: 2017 Halloween

Despite the chill in the air and the damp drizzle, the children of the night took to the neighborhoods looking for treats Tuesday night for Halloween.

Halloween 2017

With parents reliving their younger days, twins were dressed as Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck and Wayne and Garth.  One munchkin even came as a “glitter ball.”

Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse

Wayne

Garth

Mother Nature for once cooperated and allowed the rain to hold off with just a touch of cold for the youngsters to scamper about and collect candy.

While many a kiddo and parent will stay on a sugary high, check out the MySweetCharity Photo Gallery for the faces of 2017 Halloween.

Park And Palate’s Down To The Roots Turned Klyde Warren Park Into The Ideal Grazing Spot With Boldfacers And Top-Tier Chefs

On the eve of Texas-OU, Park And Palate‘s Down To The Roots at Klyde Warren Park became a splendiferous open-to-the-skies-above cuisine center. So, while Uptown, Greenville Avenue and other party joints were elbow-to-elbow with out of town visitors on Friday, October 13, Klyde Warren had such heavy hitters as SMU’s First Couple Gail and Gerald Turner and Nancy and Randy Best grazing the grounds, thanks to the area’s top chefs led by Chef Dean Fearing. Here’s a report from the field:  

Gail and Gerald Turtner*

Randy and Nancy Best*

Klyde Warren Park kicked off Park & Palate on Friday, October 13, with Down to the Roots, its VIP celebration for park donors and sponsors. For its signature fundraising event, Klyde Warren Park transformed its normally bustling greenspace into a food-lover’s paradise with plush lounge areas, inviting highboy tables and of course makeshift kitchens for some of the state’s top chefs sprinkling the lawn. Guests like event co-hosts Lyn and John Muse and Carolyn and Rob Walters, Sheila and Jody Grant and Mayor Mike Rawlings enjoyed unique dishes created by top chefs including Dean FearingKent Rathbun, Jason Dady and Jon Bonnell

Carolyn Rose Walters and Rob Walters*

Jody and Sheila Grant*

The evening’s theme was “Pillars and Protégés”, in which well-known pillar chefs selected a friend, co-partner, or up-and-coming protégé to be paired with to create a unique collaborative dish for the night’s tasting. A friendly competition raised the “steaks” for the participating chefs and after a fierce (and filling) competition judges Luke Mathot, Richard Ruskell and Tara Green, president of Klyde Warren Park named Jason Dady and Jeff Bekavac the evening’s winners. The two received a pair of boots from event sponsor Lucchese for their Short Rib Tacos.

Tara Green, Luke Mathot and Richard Ruskell*

While the Blood Orange Margaritas and Jameson Sours flowed, guests enjoyed dessert from Fluff Bake Bar and Chef-host Dean Fearing while they danced to country music artist David Nail.

Thanks to the help of event sponsors like Republic National Distributing Company, Texas Capital Bank and Winston & Strawn LLP, Klyde Warren Park exceeded its revenue goal for the third year of this delicious fundraiser.

SOLD-OUT ALERT!: Jubilee Park’s 20th Anniversary Gala… But

If you had your hopes up to be part of Jubilee Park’s 20th Anniversary Gala dinner at the Omni Dallas on Saturday, November 4, you’re out of luck. Event Co-Chairs Lydia and Bill Addy and Honorary Co-Chairs Peggy and Mark Anshutz have done such a fine job, the tickets for the seated dinner and festivities have been gobbled up.

Daniel Gerber and Elizabeth Hoffman*

But thanks to the Jubilee Young Friends Host Committee After-Party Co-Chairs Elizabeth Hoffman and Paige Zapffe, there’s still hope to be part of the party. Unlike some after-the-main-event festivities, this after-party isn’t going to start past your bedtime. Emerald City is going to get the action going starting at 8:30 p.m. And, of course, what would an after-party be without a MirMir photo booth, refreshments including birthday café, exclusive prizes and a raffle for a pair of earrings from Eiseman Jewels.

The Young Friends are really old friends. According to sources, “Many of the Young Friends volunteered at Jubilee Park when they were in high school or have served on Jubilee’s Young Leaders group. Just as their parents have supported Jubilee, they hope to follow suit by spreading the word to a new generation.”

Just because the dinner is a done deal, don’t miss out on the after-party fun. Get your tickets now!

Insider Tips For Saturday’s 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball’s “Shooting For The Stars”

If there are some gals MIA today, they’re over at Gilley’s Dallas. No, they’re not line-dancing and bar leaning. They’re in T-shirts, old jeans and sneakers ripping open boxes, schlepping carts around, setting up tables and getting ready for Saturday night’s 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball. After all, that’s what CBB committee members do the day before the American Cancer Society mega-fundraiser.

Cindy Stager and Amy Turner

While some might think such a gaggle of females would be high drama and round-the-clock temper tantrums, they missed the mark big-time with this bunch. One gal said that everything is so organized that they just might finish earlier than planned. Why, they even had time to have lunch with some of the past CBB chairs like Mary Humphreys Parker, Cindy Stager, Amy Turner, Tia Wynne, Andrea Weber, Olivia Kearney, Kristi Hoyl and Kristin “KJ” Sanger.

Kristi Bare, Sunie Solomon, Anne Stodghill, Wendy Messmann and Karen James

When 2017 CBB Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill were asked their secret, they attributed it to their troops like Andrea Nayfa, Nancy Gopez, Kristi Bare, Katy Bock, Wendy Messmann, Karen James, Meaghan O’Leary and others who have been working with color-coded seating charts, spreadsheets and professionalism.

Nancy Gopez. Meghan O’Leary, Andrea Nayfa and Katy Bock

They’ve even arranged for a back-up plan to accommodate Mother Nature’s mood in case she boo-hoos on the festivities. Pat Green will be on the Winston and Strawn LLP Live Auction stage in Gilley’s proper, and Brooks and Dunn will be  on the Andrews Distribution Main Stage in the humongous tent with concrete floor. Even the never-ending grazing will be indoors!

But just in case you want to be in the ultimate know, here are some insider tips to avoid those “Gee, I wished I’d known” or “Wow! I forgot all about that!” moment.

Must Have

  • More important than your cellphone will be your tickets, wristbands and hang-tags, if you’re driving. No guest will be allowed on the premises without them.
  • Also, please don’t forget your favor bag ticket. It’s not required for entrance, but you’ll hate yourself when you aren’t able to get the Hirzel Capital Favor Bag with all the swag as you leave.

Parking is a bit different this year, so be prepared. According to traffic czarina Nancy Gopez, here is the breakdown:

  • Blue hangtags — Arrive and depart in the Gilley’s driveway for valet parking.
  • Gold hangtags — Arrive at the valet parking at Kay Bailey Hutchinson Lot D. Lot opens at 5:30 p.m. Shuttle buses will take guests to the Event Center at Gilley’s Dallas. The last shuttle bus will depart Event Center at 2 a.m.
  • White Hangtag — Self-park at Eddie Deen’s starting at 6:30 p.m. Shuttle buses will take guests to the Event Center at Gilley’s Dallas. The last shuttle bus will depart Event Center at 2 a.m.
  • Limousines — Arrive and pick up at Event Center.
  • Uber, Lyft, Wynne Transportation and other private driving services — Drop off at Gilley’s driveway and pick up at Event Center

Hint: Sunie strongly recommended Ubering.

Auctions

Rhinestone longhorn head

  • The CBB Silent Auction and Big Board are available online. So, if you didn’t get your ticket in time or are at home with the sniffles, you can still bid and, hopefully, win a goody like the rhinestone longhorn head. Here’s the link to the online viewing and bidding.
  • Live Auction items will only be available at the Ball. However, if you’re out of town and really want one of the items, check with the CBB office now to make arrangements for proxy bidding.

FYI

  • No one under the age of 21 will be allowed to enter Gilley’s Dallas for the event.
  • No filming is allowed at the event.
  • Give the stilettos the night off and pull on those boots.

Check back with MySweetCharity during the day Saturday for any updates or news.

Community Partners Of Dallas’ Change Is Good Was A Multi-Generational Funfest With Sugary Treats, Bungee Cording And Loads Of Coins

As usual, the Community Partners of Dallas were prepared for young and old to feel right at home for its annual Change Is Good fundraiser at Brook Hollow Golf Club. Just in case the Dallas Cowboys game ran into a typical overtime situation, they had TV screens in place for fans. As for the kids, there was everything from sugary treats to sky-high bungee cord flying. But the youngsters were also vying for who could haul in the most ca-ching. Here is a report from the field:

From the left: (front row – Enzo Lange, Asher Lange and Jameson Lange; (back row) Ted and Becky Lange, Reese Lange; Paul and Sandra Keck, Larry and Mary Lange and Paige McDaniel*

Change is Good Chair Family Becky and Ted Lange with munchkins Reese, Jameson, Asher and Enzo, and Honorary Co-Grandparents Sandra and Paul Keck and Mary and Larry Lange were joined by more than 625 partygoers on Sunday, October 1, at the 11th Annual Change is Good, where kids collected change to change the lives of abused and neglected kids. 

Benefiting Community Partners of Dallas, participating children and teens began collecting change over the summer by emptying their own piggy banks, going door to door, setting up lemonade stands and other fundraisers or starting their own online campaign. Through their efforts 87,640 coins were collected equaling $18,574. 

From the left: (back row) Larry and Rathna Gray; (front row) Caroline Gray, Cate Gray and Brooke* Gray

Cameron Martin, Harper Martin and Kendall Martin”

Emmy Linebarger *

All collections were turned in at the Sunday, October 1st event in exchange for chances to win exciting prizes. This year’s grand prize, a GoPro HERO4 Black 4K Waterproof Action Camera Kit, was awarded to first place winners Brooke, Cate and Caroline Gray, who collected a total of $2,788.22.  Triplets Cameron, Harper and Kendall Martin were in second place with $1,062.16, of which $680 was raised online, the most of all collections. Solo entry Emmy Linebarger came in third place with a remarkable $778.57 collected. The Gray group also received an award for most quarters collected with 9,768 quarters.

Bungee cording*

Held at Brook Hollow Golf Club, the event featured activities for all ages, including bungee jumping, inflatable obstacle courses and slide, prince/princess station, paper airplane zone, GameTruck, Rad Hatter, balloon artist, face painting, bounce houses, and a DJ dance party with CPD’s favorite DJ Bill Cody.

Hula hoops*

President and CEO Paige McDaniel took a few minutes to thank the many sponsors, who had supported the event, as well as all the kids who collected change throughout the summer. She then announced the many prize-drawing winners, and recognized the change collection winners as well as the artists who had the winning designs for this year’s commemorative t-shirt: Jaxon McKinney (front artwork) and Leila Davis (back artwork).  All child attendees received a t-shirt as their parting gift.

Jaxon McKinney and Leila Davis*

Proceeds from Change is Good benefit the abused and neglected children served by Community Partners of Dallas.  This year’s event would not be possible without the generosity of our sponsors:

  • Change Champion ($5,000) – Shawn Cleveland and Winston and Strawn; Mary and Larry Lange; Becky and Ted Lange and Reese, Jameson, Asher and Enzo and Greg Nieberding/Digital 3 Printing;
  • Change for the Better ($2,500) – Lena and Derek Alley; Marybeth and Kevin Conlon and Luke Conlon and Quinn Conlon; Grant Thornton LLP; Nicola Hobeiche and Todd Hewes; Barry, Sandy, Ryan and Kennedy Moore; Al G. Hill Jr; Sandra Reese-Keck; Katherine and Eric Reeves and The Tafel Family;
  • Changing Lives ($1,250) – The Barber Family; The Kennington Families; The Clay Smith Family; Adam, Taryn, Walker, Ayla and Rilyn Spence;
  • Jar Sponsor – Park Place Porsche;
  • Media sponsors – Dallas Child and MySweetCharity.

For more information about Change is Good, visit communitypartnersdallas.org.

About Community Partners of Dallas

Since 1989, Community Partners of Dallas has ensured safety and restored dignity and hope to abused and neglected children by providing crucial resources and support to the caseworkers of Dallas County Child Protective Services.  Community Partners of Dallas provides items such as winter coats, diapers and formula, holiday gifts, school uniforms, personal hygiene products, food and more, to send the abused children in our community the message that someone does care.  Please visit www.communitypartnersdallas.org for more information.

* Photo credit: Tara Cosgrove

Leukemia Texas’ Concert For A Cure At The Rustic Features Reckless Kelly—And Great Results For Fighting Leukemia

As more than 400 people streamed into The Rustic’s outdoor patio Thursday, September 28, for Leukemia Texas‘ fifth annual Concert for a Cure, the group’s CEO, Mandy O’Neill, sat in a “cabana” at the back of the property reviewing notes with the chairs before taking off to supervise the festivities.

Below her, guests like JB Hayes, Natalie Solis, Angela Nash with Billy Martin Jr., Roger Hendren, and Amanda and Lloyd Ward were catching up with friends and eagerly awaiting the appearance of the evening’s headliner, Reckless Kelly. Mandy, meantime, was expressing her hope that the evening’s take would at least match last year’s total of $125,000.

Jenny Anchondo, Marco Rivera, Stephanie Hollman and Mandy O’Neill*

The aim seemed do-able, if the crowd’s enthusiasm was any indication. Up on the raised stage, Sybil Summers and Nathan Fast from AMP 103.7-FM—followed by event Co-Chairs Jenny Anchondo and Stephanie Hollman—spent time revving up the partygoers. Jenny sits on the Leukemia Texas board, the audience was told, while Stephanie successfully underwent a bone-marrow donation in May in Oklahoma City.

Sybil Summers and Nathan Fast**

After introducing “Natalie,” a young woman who was having various medical problems, the chairs brought out  former NFL guard Marco Rivera, who played two years (in 2005 and ’06) with the Dallas Cowboys. Marco asked the crowd to bid on tickets to the ‘Boys’ upcoming game with the Green Bay Packers, saying, “I promise you, the Dallas Cowboys will not kneel!” After Marco started the bidding at $500, the ducats went for $1,100.

Natatlie’s mother Vivian, Natalie and Marco Rivera**

Then it was time for Reckless Kelly, the much-lauded, Austin-based Americana band. The group played generously for more than an hour, sprinkling their hits with a few cover songs by Merle Haggard (“Mama Tried”) and Bob Dylan (“Subterranean Homesick Blues”). As they did, a few “swing” dancers showed off their fancy steps down in front of the stage.

Reckless Kelly’s Willy Braun**

They weren’t the only ones strutting their stuff. When all was said and done, Mandy reported that “it looks like we will be exceeding our event goal.” After accounting for expenses—they were roughly 8 percent of the total take—Concert for a Cure was on track to net $110,000.       

* Photo provided by Mandy O'Neill 
** Photo credit: Brian Maschino

Dallas CASA’s Young Professional Added Their “Voices For A Cause” At The Rustic With Brandon Rhyder For Fundraising

While North Texas Giving Day had the phones ringing off the hook and the internet donations flowing on Thursday, September 14, the Dallas CASA Young Professionals held its second annual Voices for a Cause at The Rustic. While Signed Out and Brandon Rhyder filled the scene with music, Young Professionals President Jonathan Bassham couldn’t resist reminding guests that it wasn’t too late to donate to North Texas Giving Day for Dallas CASA. Here’s a report from the field:

Jonathan Bassham and Mark Hiduke*

Linda and Rob Swartz*

Nick Berman, Caitlin Dama, Erica Whitten and Michelle Stephenson*

Voices for a Cause at The Rustic was a blast! It was a beautiful night, with great bands and lots of young people and old friends like Robert Schleckser, Woody McMinn, Dana Swann, Reasha Hedke, Madeline Littrell, Linda and Rob Swartz, Kelsey Higginbotham, Nick Berman, Caitlin Dama, Erica Whitten, Michelle Stephenson, Nicki Sherry, Paul Stafford, Mark Hiduke and Cristina and Michael Swartz.

Nicki Sherry and Paul Stafford*

Cristina and Michael Swartz

Dana Swann, Reasha Hedke and Madeline Littrell*

Dallas CASA’s Voices of Hope concert Thursday, September 14, at The Rustic netted $6,640 for Dallas CASA and an evening of fun for attendees. With more than 250 tickets sold and a clear night under the stars, the event marked a second year of success for Dallas CASA’s Young Professionals.

Kelsey Higginbotham and Brandon Rhyder*

Dallas CASA board member Dave Kroencke’s band Signed Out was the opening act. The group played covers of crowd-popular standards like “Billie Jean,” “You Give Love a Bad Name” and “Are You Gonna Go My Way,” and the crow got into the act by singing along from their lawn chairs.

Headliner Texas country artist Brandon Rhyder, sang to an enthusiastic crowd as the sun set. Young Professionals President Jonathan Bassham gave a final plug for North Texas Giving Day.

Presenting sponsors was PCORE Exploration & Production II/Mark Hiduke. Other sponsors included Linda and Rob Swartz, Sewell Automotive, Accelerate Resources and Christine and Jonathan Bassham.

* Photo provided by Dallas CASA

JUST IN: Art-Loving Rebecca Fletcher To Chair 2018 Art Ball With Theme And Date Already Set

Fess up. You honestly don’t know the difference between an Old World masterpiece and a paint-by-numbers painting. Now, don’t you feel better getting that off your chest? But you do know a real party with gorgeous people, incredible auction items, to-die-for dining and events that everyone is talking about. For instance, at the top of the list — the annual Art Ball.

So, continue with the honesty thinking. There was a time when the Dallas Museum of Art fundraiser was an over-the-top convention of art-hugging folks filling a tent that extended from the DMA to Ross. But last year the Art Ball took a major 90-degree turn. It downsized the guest list and the tent. But it upsized the excitement, the auction items and the OMG you-weren’t-there? factor thanks to Ann and Lee Hobson.

Rebecca Fletcher*

In the crowd was second-generation, art-loving  Rebecca Fletcher. (Her mama and papa, Bess and Ted Enloe, have been Dallas art supporters for decades.) How loving? She was tapped with the 2016 TACA Silver Cup and gave a killer acceptance talk.

But don’t go thinking that Rebecca is a stodgy type. For example, back in 2015 just before the Dallas Theater Center’s Moonshine Gala reception high atop the Wyly Theater, where all the glamour types were being charming, Rebecca’s heel got trapped in between the floor slats and snapped off. A gent pulled the heel out of its predicament and handed it to Rebecca, who pressed slipper and heel together and carried on.

Needless to say, Rebecca knows how to literally pull things off. So, it’s no surprise that she’s just been named to chair the 2018 Art Ball on Saturday, April 21, at the DMA.

The gal has already picked the theme — “Horizon: Now. New. Next.” — as well as the décor, thanks to event planner Todd Fiscus. Rebecca reports that it will “will focus on the DMA’s past and present while looking forward to its future… the event will feature modern, contemporary décor with a sculptural feel. Cascading color from the ceiling will mimic the vibrant horizon and will be reflected throughout in the mirrored décor.”

According to Rebecca, “As a long-time supporter of the Dallas arts community, I am honored to chair the 2018 Art Ball supporting the DMA, and I believe the theme of looking toward the horizon embodies the excitement surrounding the future of the Dallas Museum of Art and the opportunities that await. This year’s theme will bring the horizon to life through various artistic forms to create an event that will be remembered by guests for a lifetime, from live performances to beautiful artwork incorporated in new and exciting ways.”

Start dieting now, because Cassandra will be in the kitchen providing the vittles.

As for the live auction, after-party and other details, wait and see. In the meantime, budget this one on your expense account even if you don’t give a poof about art because you know you love a great party and memory maker.

* Photo provided by Dallas Museum of Art

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 11th Annual Hold’Em For Heroes

According to 11th Annual Hold’Em for Heroes Co-Chairs Mandy-Lu Ristow and Jo Trizila,

Fall is right around the corner, which means it’s time to put on your poker face and save your seat at the table for the 

11th Hold’Em for Heroes Poker Tournament*

and live auction. Guests are invited to experience three hours of competitive poker playing, while enjoying hors d’oeuvres, an open bar and dinner. Tables are run by professional dealers and re-buys are available throughout the evening. Each player will be given their first set of chips and back by popular demand, there will be a sit and go table for those who want to try again after playing out. The top ten winners will choose between a variety of fabulous prizes from trips to gift baskets to sporting event packages. This year’s event will be held at Brook Hollow Golf Club on Thursday, November 2.

All proceeds from the event will benefit Heroes for Children – a unique nonprofit that provides financial and social assistance to Texas families with children battling cancer.

No one plans for their child to have cancer. A cancer diagnosis is expensive in every way and impacts the entire family. Heroes for Children works to alleviate financial pressure by covering immediate financial needs including paying rent and mortgages, transportation costs to and from treatment, costs of hospital visits and, in some cases, even funeral expenses.

The Hold’Em for Heroes event has gotten bigger and better each year. We rely on generous donors, community partnerships and participants at annual fundraising events including Hold’Em for Heroes to support Texas families with children battling cancer.

Texans have always been known for their generosity, and for this along with the 4,500 families we have served, we are forever grateful. We could not do what we do without the time, talent and treasures of the generous people of Texas – whose hearts are as big as our great state.

To purchase a ticket, sponsor the event or for more information about Hold’Em for Heroes please visit, www.heroesforchildren.org/dallasholdem.

*Graphic courtesy of Heroes for Children

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Concert For A Cure

According to Leukemia Texas CEO Mandy O’Neill,

Mandy O’Neill, Dr. Maro O’Hanian and Erin Krah*

Over the past several years, Leukemia Texas has been able to fund every, eligible patient aid applicant. That was close to 500 applicants last year battling this devastating disease in Texas, a large number of these from the Dallas area. Their success is because of perseverance, limited expenses and generous donors who believe in their unique motto as ‘the only organization of its kind where funds raised in Texas, stay in Texas!’

Over the past five years, Leukemia Texas has increased their annual revenue more than 250%. As the demand for patient support increases, the need to generate revenue is strong. I’ve continued to keep the tradition of this 47-year-old organization, founded by the Minyard Family (Gretchen Minyard Williams and Liz Minyard Lokey continue to be active board members) by keeping expenses low and strengthening their signature events. The Beatleukemia Ball, Golf Classic and Concert for a Cure all generated record numbers this past year. They have also partnered with the MJ Event bringing in at least $250,000 new net dollars every year.

Concert For A Cure*

With their tremendous growth, and an estimated 3,000+ new leukemia diagnoses across the state, the addition of a third full time staff member is crucial. Leukemia Texas is currently searching for a seasoned Director of Program Development who is well versed in program management and major gift fundraising. Those interested in applying may reach out to Mandy at [email protected].

Their next event is the 5th annual Concert for a Cure to be held at the Rustic on Thursday September 28. Previous honorees include Kelcy Warren, Alicia Landry and Lynn McBee. Join Fox 4’s Jenny Anchondo, Real Housewife of Dallas Stephanie Hollman and former Dallas Cowboy and Hall of Famer Marco Rivera as they celebrate, eat delicious bites and raise critical funds to directly support leukemia patients in our own backyard.

* Graphic/photo provided by Leukemia Texas

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 2017 ReuNight

According to 2017 ReuNight Co-Chairs Jennifer and Richard Dix and Kristi and Ron Hoyl,

Richard and Jennifer Dix (File photo)

Ron and Kristi Hoyl (File photo)

On Wednesday, November 8, ReuNight will be one of the first public events at the newly remodeled Statler. A modern approach to a classic icon, the Statler blends the past with the present. For this reason, ReuNight 2017 will pay homage to important Dallas icons. ReuNight has become an exclusive annual dinner and live auction that attracts respected leaders and philanthropists that raises much-needed funds for The Family Place.

The evening’s format will include cocktails in the hotels’ first-level garden and photo opportunities with the infamous Llinda Llee Llama, the hotel’s living mascot. Guests will then head upstairs for a sumptuous three-course dinner and wine pairings in the grand ballroom complete with table-side cocktail service. A limited, live auction of luxury goods and trips will be conducted during dinner. Afterward, guests will enjoy a lively after party on the pool deck overlooking the Dallas skyline.

Statler Hilton*

Founded by a group of community volunteers in 1978, The Family Place empowers victims of family violence by providing safe housing, counseling and skills that create independence while building community engagement and advocating for social change to stop family violence. As the largest and leading domestic violence service provider, the organization delivers proven programs that address emotional and physical abuse and incest. The Family Place provides free comprehensive victims’ services that prevent violence and fully support women, children and men on their path from fear to safety.

The event is limited to 175 guests so we encourage you to visit www.familyplace.org/reunight to ensure your participation in this unique event.

* Photo provided by The Family Place


MySweetCharity Opportunity: Grow The Grove

According to Grow the Grove co-chairs Muffin Lemak and Susan Palma,

Muffin Lemak and Susan Palma*

The fun has already begun for the second annual Grow the Grove event, happening on Friday, November 17, at 7 p.m. as we work alongside our Honorary Co-Chairs Mary and Mike Terry on this special evening benefiting Cristo Rey Dallas.

 Following last year’s sell-out event, Grow the Grove will take place at the venue sixty five hundred, located at 6500 Cedar Springs Road. The denim to dresses event will include a chef-prepared meal, fine wine, a spirited signature cocktail, live auction and more.

 Proceeds from Grow the Grove will benefit Cristo Rey Dallas, an innovative high school located in Pleasant Grove that offers students who would otherwise not consider private school a rigorous college prep education paired with a valuable work study program.  

The important work happening at Cristo Rey Dallas is making a positive impact on the lives of hundreds of dedicated high school students and their families, as well as the Dallas community as whole through the school’s Corporate Work Study Program.

 We are thrilled to have the opportunity to celebrate the great success of Cristo Rey Dallas. Grow to Grove will be a night of great fun that supports an even greater initiative—preparing hardworking students to go to and through college!

DeeDee Lee and Janie Condon (File photo)

Mike and Micki Rawlings (File photo)

Claire Emanuelson and Pam Perella (File photo)

Candace and Jim Krause

Grow the Grove host committee members include: Lydia and Bill Addy, Helaine and Dan Blizzard, Becky and Ken Bruder, Susi and Peter Brundage, Jessica and Jeff Burrow, Karen and Mark Carney, Shelly and Tom Codd, Janie and David Condon, Claire and Dwight Emanuelson, Ola and Randall Fojtasek, Barbara and Brad Fritts, Susan and Mark Godvin, Jane and Greg Greene, Jean and Erik Hansen, Julie and Ed Hawes, Candace and Jimmy Krause, Leslie and Michael Lanahan, Patty and Mark Langdale, DeeDee and Jimmy Lee, Ann and Chris Mahowald, Kiley McGuire, Karla and Mark McKinley, Susan McSherry, Tricia and Bill Miller, Laura and Scott Moore, Michelle Moussa, Angela Nash, Ruthie and Jay Pack, Pam and Gary Patsley, Pam and Vin Perella, Susan and Jon Piot, Micki and Mike Rawlings, Randa and Doug Roach, Shelle and Michael Sills, Mary and Mike Smith, Mersina Stubbs, Beth and Chuck Thoele, Debbie and John Tolleson, Piper and Mike Wyatt and Ana and Jim Yoder.

Patty and Mark Langdale (File photo)

Chuck and Beth Thoele (File photo)

Mersina Stubbs (File photo)

Angela Nash (File photo)

Susan McSherry (File photo)

Mike and Piper Wyatt (File photo)

Michael and Shelle Sills (File photo)

Sponsorships for Grow the Grove begin at $1,600.  Limited tickets will be available closer to the event at a cost of $320 each for preferred seating or $250 each for general admission. For more information, contact Lisa Brunts[email protected] or visit cristoreydallas.org.

Located in Pleasant Grove, Cristo Rey Dallas College Prep provides economically challenged students of all faiths with a college preparatory education enabling them to become men and women of purpose and service. Through a rigorous curriculum, integrated with a hands-on professional work experience, students graduate ready to succeed in college and in life. cristoreydallas.org.

* Photo credit: Tamytha Cameron Smith

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Night At The Museum

According to Night At The Museum Co-Chairs Sylvia Cespedes and Meredith Plunkett,

Hernan Saenz and Sylvia Cespedes*

Mark and Meredith Plunkett*

Mirages and mystery games, deception and disguises, camouflage formations, natural curiosities and secret societies. Much like the Perot Museum itself, this must-do event is one of the most interactive and engaging parties of the year. On Saturday, November 11, guests will spend the evening exploring 180,000 square feet of exciting encryptions, deceptive displays, and forensics fun, including:

  • Lie-detector tests
  • Wine tastings
  • Blind food tastings
  • Human mazes
  • Mirrored illusions
  • Game of mystery
  • Baffling botany
  • Handwriting analysis

The event also promises to astound your taste buds with menu marvels such as 3D food printing, quirky cocktails and a mystery food lab, to name a few. On every floor and at every turn, this year’s “Night at the Museum: Intrigue” is sure to have guests questioning reality and asking, “How did they do that?!”

We are thrilled to join our husbands, Hernan Saenz and Mark Plunkett, as co-chairs of this year’s event, along with Honorary Co-Chairs Sharon and Kip Tindell. If you like to party for a good cause, please mark your calendars and sign-up to attend this year’s gala, which runs from 7 p.m. – midnight on all five levels of the Museum. Underwriting packages begin at $2,500 (six guests). Cocktail attire – or your favorite mysterious garb – is preferred.

Proceeds from the annual Night at the Museum gala support the Museum’s mission to inspire minds through nature and science, from on-site and outreach programs for pre-K through 12th graders, to financial assistance that allows students to visit the Museum, regardless of their school’s ability to pay. Underwriting contributions also fund research and collections efforts and help secure top-quality traveling exhibitions.
We hope you will join us for this fabulous event that will help so many North Texas youth get critical exposure to the sciences. For more information, please email [email protected] or call 214.756.5815.

* Photo provided by Perot Museum

MySweetCharity Opportunity: Cattle Baron’s Ball

According to 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball Co-Chairs Sunie Solomon and Anne Stodghill,

Anne Stodghill and Sunie Solomon (File photo)

The Cattle Baron’s Ball relies on the spirit and generosity of the Metroplex to fund the fight against cancer. Since 1974, we’ve raised more than $71 million for cancer research, the majority of which is conducted right here in DFW. True to Texas’ history of rising to the challenge, we’ve become the world’s largest single-night fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.

While some might be hand-wringing at the prospect of continuing a legacy of ensuring more cancer research dollars are spent in Dallas than anywhere else in the country, they probably aren’t familiar with the members of the Cattle Baron’s Ball. Fortunately, the Cattle Baron’s Ball Committee is not comprised of the faint-of-heart – as evidenced by the fact that the CBB is the largest single-night fundraiser in the nation for cancer research through the American Cancer Society.

Join the fight and help us continue to make a difference! Cattle Baron’s Ball continues to support the American Cancer Society in the following incredible ways:

  • Provided more than 30,000 services to cancer patients in North Texas
  • Gave 7,414 rides to and from treatment
  • More than 1,500 free wigs were provided free of charge to cancer patients
  • More than 1,000 breast cancer patients were visited by our Reach to Recovery volunteers
  • Helped to enact strong state and local smoke-free laws that protect workers and the public from the dangers of secondhand smoke
  • Connected patients with more than 64,000 different treatment options, through our Clinical Trials Matching Service
  • Found the link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer

Brooks and Dunn*

Dust off your boots and join us at Gilley’s on Saturday, October 21, for some serious Texas barbecue, the best silent and live auctions in town, followed by a heart-stopping performance from award-winning country and western entertainers Brooks and Dunn.

Everyone knows someone affected by cancer. From attending the ball to purchasing a raffle ticket, get involved with Cattle Baron’s Ball however you can and help us continue making a difference. 

Visit www.cattlebaronsball.com.

* Photo provided by 
2017 Cattle Baron's 
Ball

JUST IN: 2017 ReuNight Co-Chairs Reveal Location, Date And Llama Of Honor For The Family Place Fundraiser

Richard and Jennifer Dix (File photo)

Ron and Kristi Hoyl (File photo)

After weeks of begging, demanding, cajoling and stalking 2107 ReuNight Co-Chairs Jennifer and Richard Dix and Kristi and Ron Hoyl, they finally fessed up the plans for The Family Place fundraiser.

Llama (File photo)

Last year’s dinner and live auction were part of the opening festivities of  downtown’s Forty Five Ten. So what could top that?

Well, the Dixes and Hoyls have managed to do it. They’ve arranged to be “one of the first public events” at the 21st century reawakening of The Statler. The evening will start off with a cocktail reception on the ground-level garden followed by a three-course dinner upstairs in the grand ballroom. After the live auction, the celebration will continue around the pool with the Dallas skyline serving as a backdrop.

And what would an event like this be without a celebrity? Forty Five Ten had Donna Karan. The Statler will have a representative of the hotel’s original mascot, Llinda Llee Llama, at the cocktail party. It’s doubtful the llama will be able to stay for dinner.

The night of modern-day fundraising in a legendary landmark will start at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 8.

BTW, individual tickets are gonna be extremely limited, so consider being a sponsor to guarantee your spot. Check with Mary Catherine Benavides at 214.443.7770 about the various levels of sponsorship.