Kid To Do’s Party Safari At The Dallas Zoo Will Be Perfect For Young Party Animals On June 1

Thank heaven the Dallas Zoo folks realized that as much fun as Zoo To Do is, kids would love their own version. Thus gave birth to last year’s Kid To Do. It was such a hit that they decided on doing it again calling it “Party Safari” in the Lacerte Family Children’s Zoo, the Giants of the Savanna and Cat Green from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 1. But there’s a new addition — Jamie, the zoo’s two-year-old giraffe. She’ll serve as “safari guide” for the event that will include “kid-friendly fare” from 16 area restaurants (eatZi’s Market and Bakery, la Madeleine, El Fenix, Urban Crust, Shinsei, MAX’s Wine Dive, Which Wich, Church’s, Service Systems Associates, Stephan Pyles Caters, Dread Head Chef, Start Restaurant, Cook Hall, Uncle Julio’s, Pecan Hall and Dallas Affaires Cakes Co.) headed up by Honorary Restaurant Chairs Tracy and Kent Rathbun with their kids Max and Garrett.

And because the activities will be kiddo-oriented, silent and live auctions will be replaced by bounce houses, a live DJ, face painting, art, crafts, a private bird show in the Wildlife Amphitheater and some “unique animal encounters.”

Rosie (File photo)

Rosie (File photo)

Of course, Jamie won’t be the only animal partying with the kids. Some, like Rosie, just might be available for photo opps, while others, like Patrick, will be safely beyond reach.

Patrick (File photo)

Patrick (File photo)

Event Chairs Julie and Rob Little and their munchkins Elise, Gracie and Anna have not only arranged to have Kellie Rasberry and her daughter Emma as honorary chairs, they’ve signed up the following sponsors:

  • Founding sponsor ($50,000): M.R. & Evelyn Hudson Foundation
  • Presenting sponsor ($30,000): Highland Capital Management
  • Supporting sponsor ($15,000): Gibson, Dunn and Crutcher LLP
  • Leaping Lions ($10,000): AMS Pictures and Union Bank Foundation
  • Generous Giraffes ($5,000): Mary Anne and Richard Cree, Al G. Hill Jr. Family and NexBank
  • Eager Elephants ($2,500): Bank of America, Jennifer, John and Alexandra Eagle, Amanda and Chris George, Carol and Don Glendenning/Locke Lord LLP, Herb’s Paint and Body Shops, Jackson Walker LLP, Carol and John I. Levy and Tenet Healthcare Corporation
  • Zany Zebras ($1,000): Allyn Media/The Pascal Family, Nancy and John Benefield, Diane and Hal Brierley, Kathy and Harlan Crow, Gina and Scott Ginsburg, The Moody‐Dahlberg Family, Maria and Kip Plankinton, Deedie and Rusty Rose, Ruibal’s Plants of Texas, Straight Line Automotive Group, Turner Construction, Emily and Daniel Vafa and Whitlock Family
  • Charming Cheetahs ($500): Tracy and Clay Aaron, Bonner and Thomas Allen, The Aron Family, BBVA Compass, The Berkley Family, Dr. and Mrs. Farhad E. Boltchi, Paige and Greg Bordelon, Cynthia and Jeff Bowen, The Brewer Family, Jennifer Cather, In Memory of Sheila Chapman, David Corrigan Family, Erin Nealy Cox and Trey Cox – Amelia, Cate and Vivian, Mandy Dake and Chris Rowley, Suzanne and Drew Durgin, Susan and Terry Eckert, Kathryn and Lance Etcheverry, Amanda and Mark Francis, Kathy and Kevin Hanrahan, Valerie and Todd Istre, The Laws Family, Anne and David Mann, Rhonda, Fraser, Nolan and Emmy Marcus, Amy and Jamie Mentgen, The Meyer Family, ORIX Foundation, Carrie and Steven Parsons, Julie and Steve Rado, Tonya and Todd Ramsey – Tru, Maggie and Berkeley, Heather Randall, Rogers‐O’Brien Construction, The Sachs Family, Keith Schumann and Matthew Simon, Nicole and Justin Small, Jennifer and Dan Spears, Christine and Steve Standbridge – Isabel, Ian and Elise, The Utay Family, Geoff, Leslie, William and Elizabeth Wayne, The Wharton Family and Christina, Allen, Alexander, and Caroline White.
  • Media Sponsors: Dallas Child and MommyMixer

Children’s Cancer Fund Luncheon & Fashion Show Splashed With Success For Its 25th Anniversary

The 1,000 guests at the Hilton Anatole only thought they were attending the Children’s Cancer Fund’s 25th Annual Luncheon & Fashion Show on May 3. Instead they found themselves in a glamorous undersea grotto. But more about that in a second.

Roger Staubach

Roger Staubach

Troy Aikman

Troy Aikman

While the guests checked out the silent auction in the lobby outside of the Chantilly Ballroom, there were two other areas that were jamming with activity. In the Peacock Room, the VIP’s were lining up to have their photos taken with Honorary Co-chairs Roger Staubach and Troy Aikman. As they waited for the next group to “grip and grin” for a photo, the two former Dallas Cowboys quarterbacks seemed like two brothers who never tire of catching up. Nearby was Daryl Johnston, who was also the center of photo attention.

Daryl Johnston

Daryl Johnston

Over to the side was Honorary Co-chair Marianne Staubach, who shied away from the photo opps and just visited with guests. She and Roger had just returned from taking 14 of their 15 grandkids to Disney World. When asked how they managed all those youngsters, she laughed that some of their parents came along to ramrod the troops. Marianne then added that the oldest grandchild, who’s 28, even came along.

Chenee Cayco and Lord Jeff Henderson

Chenee Cayco and Lord Jeff Henderson

Across the hall in the Wedgewood Room, things were not quite as orderly and proper. Heck, no. Clowns were making balloon animals, Red Knight Jeff Henderson was charming little princesses like Chenee Cayco, beachballs were being tossed around by Margaret Strand, Hailee Russell Alpin was having her makeup and hair done and Danae “Miss Texas” Couch was being photographed with teenage boys and future Miss Texases. What was Miss Texas doing here? According to Danae, “I believe it’s important to encourage children with diseases to keep fighting.”

Kami Nelson and Rudy Gatlin

Kami Nelson and Rudy Gatlin

Over at a table Rudy Gatlin was talking with CCF Show Alum Kami Nelson about their upcoming performance in the show.  “She’s a very special person,” Rudy said. That was the consensus of all of the “celebrities” about the children filling the room. It was their day to be in the spotlight instead of in treatment for cancer. They were the heroes of heroes. In addition to walking the runway with the well-knowns to the applause of the 1,000 guest, they were also wearing their new duds thanks to Dillard’s. Each year the retailer has let the kid models pick out their outfits and take them home.

Natasha Green

Natasha Green

In the hallway, UPS’ Lindsay Cordova and Michael Wheeler were giving a quick driving lesson to Natasha Green in a mini-UPS truck.

While all of these activities were going on, event producer Rhonda Chambers Sargent was in the ballroom going over last-minute walk-throughs and having “The Voice” runner-up Terry McDermott rehearse his song.

Elizabeth Farr and Jennifer DeLaughter

Elizabeth Farr and Jennifer DeLaughter

In the meantime, Event Co-chairs Jennifer DeLaughter and Elizabeth Farr were looking at the ballroom that had been transformed into a Tiffany palace that Ariel would have loved. With walls totally covered with mammoth drapings and blue and pink lighting, the tables and chairs were equally spectacular with blue and beige satin fabric.  The stage was bubbling with blue, yellow and green balloons with additional undersea balloon critters.

To provide an absolutely flawless view of the every iota of the show and the artwork by the child artists, seven huge screens were ready to let everyone in the room not miss one thing.

Now, here’s a nice little factoid about how the people and nonprofits work together to raise funds. First, all those miles of fabric that sent the look of the room over the top had been donated by Prashe Décor.

And those mammoth screens, well, it seems that just two days later the Texas Rangers were to have their annual fundraiser, “Triple Play Game Show Spectacular,” in the ballroom. They had already arranged to have the screens and riggings for their event and offered them to CCF for the luncheon. Nice play. . . very nice play.

Mike Crum, Ian Lemus and Clarie Tinsley

Mike Crum, Ian Lemus and Clarie Tinsley

When the doors opened, the luncheon and show were quickly underway. Unlike last year in which the lengthy show was broken into two segments, this one moved quickly and efficiently without losing one bit of compassion. Veteran emcees Clarice Tinsley and Steve Eagar handled their duties seamlessly. Scott Murray and Matt Blevins moved the live auction quickly.

"Sea Smiles" by Christopher H. Martin and the CCF kids

“Sea Smiles” by Christopher H. Martin and the CCF kids

The two highlights included the auctioning of “Sea Smiles, a whimsical painting by Christopher H. Martin and the CCF kids, and the “Call for Cash” in which Children’s Medical Center’s Dr. Shannon Cohn and her patient Rina Cantrell and her mom Angela Cantrell were introduced to the crowd. Wearing white rose wrist corsages from Rina’s grandmother, the two looked more like old buds as opposed to doctor-patient. All in white, three-year-old Rina twirled and swirled along the runway. She was just like any other little girl. Only Rina, like the other CCF children, was one with a mission — to beat cancer. Thanks to the 1,000 guests and the event organizers, funds were raised to help Rina and the others accomplish their goal.

Dr. Shannon Cohn and Rina Cantrell

Dr. Shannon Cohn and Rina Cantrell

Don’t Just Show Your Love. . . “Share The Love” This Friday For Ronald McDonald House Of Dallas

Black seems to go with everything and it’s so slimming. Add a splash of red and it’s perfect for any occasion. That’s exactly what the Ronald McDonald House of Dallas team thought, too. So, they came up with T-shirts that have both black and red and a lot of love for this year’s “Share the Love” on Friday, May 17.

Danna Flemons, Diane Fullingim and Carrie Arnot

Danna Flemons, Diane Fullingim and Carrie Arnot

Just think how fashionable you’ll be on Friday. For once, a T-shirt that will be appropriate anywhere to show your support of Ronald McDonald House of Dallas. . . at least for that Friday.

For $15 you not only get a shirt, you also help pay for a night’s stay by a family with a child being treated in Dallas/Fort Worth. And if you order more, you only have to pay $10 for each additional shirt. Hmm, causes a mind to wonder: What if you bought shirts for your whole office, book club or your own kids?

But you’d better hustle, because time and T-shirts are going fast.

Photo provided by Ronald McDonald House of Dallas

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Children’s Cancer Fund Luncheon & Fashion Show

_MG_9683The Children’s Cancer Fund Luncheon & Fashion Show is the one occasion when the highest-profiled celebs are totally upstaged and don’t mind one iota. It’s because the center of attention is on the munchkin heroes partying and parading on the runway.

You might want to check out the MySweetCharity Photo Gallery to see some of the most adorable cancer warriors around and their adult pals.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: The Great Create

Due to popular demand, more photos from the Nasher Sculpture Center’s “Great Create” were posted on the MySweetCharity Photo Gallery._MG_7950

 

 

 

Prepare yourself for lots of colors, munchkins frolicking and inspirational artists.

The Great Create Was Indeed A Great Success

Sunday, April 28 was the first time that the Nasher Sculpture Center had closed its doors for a special event for entire day. Initial reports indicates that it won’t be the last. . . at least for this once-a-year event.

Future artists

Future artists

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

Decades ago, some of the ladies who today are respected leaders of the community and symbols of always doing the right thing, learned to love Neiman Marcus thanks to the forward-thinking Stanley Marcus.

He realized that building relationships started about two seconds after the umbilical cord was cut. To do the bonding as quickly as possible, he and the Godmother of NM Cuisine Helen Corbitt made the downtown Zodiac Room the place to celebrate munchkin birthdays. Little girls would don their prettiest party dresses and even white gloves to sip chicken broth from demitasses, dine on Little Hens and desserts like the Little Princess (porcelain torsos with skirts of cake, ice cream and meringue) and Flower Pot (little baked Alaskas). One woman recalled her mother teaching her the phone number for the flagship before the family phone number.

Perhaps it was this cradle relationship building that inspired the Nasher folks to invent the Great Create for 500 kids and grownups, adding their own twist. Instead of couture dresses, they hoped to ease children into getting friendly with the various arts. How did they do it? No, there was no sitting in chairs listening to some art critic drone on. No, there was no tour of sculptures with a gray-haired doyenne talking way over their heads.

But how did the Nasher team transport an educational opportunity into more fun than an amusement park? They had some strictly amazing and patient artists show the kids how art takes place; then they got them to create it themselves. Don’t tell anyone, but the artists became kids themselves.

Sculpting Pete

Sculpting Pete

Sculptor Brad Oldham and wife Christy Coltrin had the kids help shape, add texture and sign their names to a bigger-than-life-size sculpture of their pooch, Pete. Unfortunately, due to the “No Pets” rule at the Nasher, Pete had to stay home. After the event the sculpture’s progress will be posted on Brad’s blog and eventually tuned into a bronze sculpture.

Diana Al-Hadid designing a dress

Diana Al-Hadid designing a dress

Artist Diana Al-Hadid was making all types of clothes for kids, like the skirt for one wee gal by stapling paper plates together.

Other artists included Kyle Hobratschk (printmaking), Marianne Newsom and Sunny Sliger (streaming), Jason Meadows (mail art), John Holt Smith (spin-art oculi), Annette Lawrence (texture plates), Allison V. Smith (digital photography), Ry Rocklen (scale museum) and Lizzy Wetzel (felt flowers).

Nasher Director of External Affairs Jill Magnuson said, “I really think there are some future artists here. I think this type of event can have an impact on the lives of children.”

Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson, Max Anderson and Jeremy Strick

Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson, Max Anderson and Jeremy Strick

Even the parents like Tom Hoitsma, Kimberly and Justin Whitman with son J.R., and Rob Sumner got caught up in the fun of the afternoon. Recently divorced arts couple Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson and Max Anderson were there supporting the event and their kids.

The Nasher garden with its water features, sculptures and tree-shaded lawn was magical, with characters decked out in layers of multi-colored ribbons of paper, walls of wire netting just asking to be decorated with the paper and the stations of interactive art projects.

There seemed to be only two speeds — stopping in your tracks to learn how art takes place or doing cartwheels on the lawn.

Brady Wood, Stella Wrubel, Honor, Megan and Wheeler Wood and Lucy and Steve Wrubel

Brady Wood, Stella Wrubel, Honor, Megan and Wheeler Wood and Lucy and Steve Wrubel

As for the musical entertainment, it was a pint-sized Beatles group, Run for Your Life, that blew all ages away. In addition to looking too cute for words, they knew how to handle instruments like the best of them. Perhaps they were trying to impress Co-chair/DJ Lucy Wrubel who, along with husband Steve and daughter Stella and Co-chairs Megan and Brady Wood with their kiddos Honor and Wheeler, were entertainment themselves. No need. The co-chairs were the ones who suggested the band.

Run for Your Life

Run for Your Life

According to Lucy, the day was so successful, they’re already in talks for next year. Well, yeah! The funds raised go to the Nasher’s education programs. Their goal this year was $50K but, before the doors even opened, they had hit the $80K mark.

They’re already talking about having an encore performance next year. If you don’t have a kiddo, find one. This is an event that is a must for kids of all ages.