JUST IN: Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s Jonathan Martin Is Headed to Cincinnati

Jonathan Martin (File photo)

Our buddy Mike Granberry at The Dallas Morning News is reporting that Dallas Symphony Orchestra CEO/President  Jonathan Martin announced this morning that he’ll be joining the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in September.

Taking over his duties immediately will be Michelle Miller Burns. Jonathan will serve as an advisor to the board chair and Michelle until he leaves at the end of August.

Dallas Film Society President/CEO Lee Papert To Exit The Popcorn World

Sarah and Lee Papert (File photo)

Dallas Film Society President/CEO Lee Papert is leaving the dark theaters of the film world and looking to a brighter future. As soon as the official word on his departure is received, it will be posted.

In talking with Lee, he admitted that six years ago he started a whole new world, both personally and professionally. Just the week before being named to head up the DFS, he married Sarah Papert, who is executive director of the Vickery Meadows Learning Center.

Lee will still be at DFS through June. After that, he’ll probably have to go through popcorn-withdrawal treatments.

Carolina Herrera Exec Lauren Astry Sorensen Had Lunch With Crystal Charity Ball Members Before Catching A Flight To The Met Gala

Since being named vice president of global marketing and communications for Carolina Herrera on January 23, Lauren Astry Sorensen has been a very busy gal. Following Ivanka Trump’s wearing Herrera to the Inaugural Ball in Washington, Lauren’s been juggling her non-stop schedule. Monday, May 1, was one of those travel challenges. With turbulent weather, she just barely made it to Dallas for the Highland Park Village Herrera’s luncheon honoring the new Crystal Charity Ball members.

Lauren Astry Sorensen

Allison Presser

Without a hair out of place, she and store manager Allison Presser welcomed the house full of oldtimers and newbies. Little did anyone know that almost immediately following her welcome to the group, Lauren was back at DFW International to catch a flight back to NYC for the Met Gala red carpet, where Hailey Baldwin, Karlie Kloss, Taylor Hill and Emmy Rossum were in Herreras.

Lisa Longino and Dianne LaRoe

Candace Winslow

Meredith Bebee and Delilah Boyd

Shannon Thompson

As for the lunch, it was the opportunity for the new kids (Meredith Bebee, Dianne LaRoe, Kim Quinn, Shannon Thompson, Dee Velvin and Candace Winslow) on the fundraising block to be officially introduced to the membership. MIA was new member Lisa Singleton due to her day-job call to action. Unlike years past, where a “sponsor” introduced the new member, the introductions were made by New Member Liaisons Tucker Enthoven and Susan Farris.

Carolina Herrera fashion

Carolina Herrera fashion

Carolina Herrera fashion

Carolina Herrera fashions

Following the brief intros, the Herrera fashions paraded around the room surrounded by displays of the designer’s handiwork to the delight of the fashion-loving guests.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Crystal Charity Ball New Member Luncheon

Carolina Herrera Global Marketing and Communications VP Lauren Astry Sorensen had a whirlwind stop in Dallas before heading back to NYC for the Met Gala red carpet on Monday, May 1. But she wasn’t about to miss the Crystal Charity Ball new members luncheon at the Herrera’s salon in Highland Park Village.

Lauren Astry Sorensen

Lisa Longino and Dianne LaRoe

The occasion was a mixed bag of CCB oldtimers getting an official introduction to the newbies and all getting an eyeful of Herrera designs.

Carolina Herrera fashion

Carolina Herrera fashion

Carolina Herrera fashion

The post is almost finished. In the meantime, check out the ladies and fashions at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

JUST IN: Dallas Women’s Foundation’s “Unlocking Leadership Campaign” Adds A New Recognition Level — Leadership Key Club

The Dallas Women’s Foundation team announced “a new recognition level” — Leadership Key Club — in its Unlocking Leadership Campaign to reach its $50M goal. The Club is made up of people “who have contributed $100,000 or more.”

At the 2016 luncheon it was reported that the Campaign had hit the $32M mark.

According to Campaign Co-Chair Ashlee Kleinert, “Since the luncheon, we’ve raised an additional $3 million, which is absolutely wonderful. More than 4,000 generous donors have stepped up during what we consider to be the initial ‘quiet phase’ of the campaign, which is both humbling and exciting. Now that we’re past the campaign’s halfway mark, we want to motivate and inspire other community members to follow their example and help us cross the finish line in the near future.”

Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Paula Parker

Unlocking Leadership Campaign funds will go to the “Foundation’s primary focus areas — women’s economic security and women’s leadership.”

DWF President/CEO Roslyn Dawson Thompson explained, “An investment in this campaign is an investment to ensure that girls and women are on equal footing, which is especially important since Texas women live in poverty at a higher rate than men: only 30 percent of North Texas households are led by women, but 53 percent of all poor households are women-led. Our mission is as important today as it has ever been: Dallas Women’s Foundation invests in women and girls and empowers women’s philanthropy to build a better world. When their lives are transformed, our region and economy are transformed, and that is the ripple effect we seek to achieve.”

So far, Leadership Key Club members include Ellenore and Kirk Baker, Lucy and Henry Billingsley, Cecilia and Garrett Boone, Kalita and Ed Blessing, Erin and Bob Botsford, Jill and Jim Cochran, Serena and Tom Connelly, Ka and L.L. Cotter, Peggy Simmons Dear, Kaleta A. Doolin and Alan Govenar, Lauren Embrey, Julie and Bob England, Beverly Goulet, Trish Houck and Lyssa Jenkens, Heather L. Hunt, Nancy Ann and Ray Hunt, Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Anne Knight, Sarah and Alan Losinger, Ann E. and Fred Margolin, Janie and Cappy McGarr, Maribess and Jerry Miller, Retta Miller,Toni Muñoz-Hunt and Dan Hunt, Diane S. Paddison, Paula and Ron Parker, Betty S. Regard, Lisa and Matt Rose, Janice and Michael Sharry, Lisa K. Simmons, Sue and Paul Spellman, Betty and Stephen Suellentrop, Roslyn Dawson Thompson and Rex W. Thompson, Patricia A. Vaughan and Barbara S. Turner, Martha and Max Wells, Donna M. Wilhelm, Shawna D. Wilson and Trea and Richard Yip.

If you want to join the Club and help in the development female leadership and well-being, contact DWF Senior VP Shawn Wills at 214.525.5318.

As Hope Cottage Warms Up For Its Centennial, CEO Sonyia Hartwell Is Retiring With Chief Program Officer Brooks Quinlan Moving On Up

Hope Cottage is getting ready to kick off its centennial warm-up year at 8 a.m. on Saturday, June 3, with “Step Up For Hope Fundraising Walk” starting at Hope Cottage.  There will be no charge, but if a person raises $100 s/he’ll be rewarded with an event shirt and a goody bag.

All members of the family are invited to participate including the pets. (Cats might be a bit skittish about joining in, so let them stay at home on the couch.)

There will be games plus prizes for individual and teams who raise the most monies, best team costume and best dressed canine (leash required) in the pooch parade.

Sonyia Hartwell (File photo)

Brooks Quinlan (File photo)

Unfortunately, Hope Cottage CEO Sonyia Hartwell will not be a part of all the official festivities. She’s retiring to Arizona on Wednesday, June 28, after working at the adoption agency since 2009. During her tenure, she saw Hope Cottage through many developments, including the moving of its facility at Fitzhugh and McKinney to its brand spanking new sweetheart of a building in the Wilson Historic District.

As for who will be replacing Sonyia, it will be Hope Cottage Chief Program Officer Brooks Quinlan, who also joined Hope Cottage in 2009.

Business Council For The Arts Is Calling All Art Heroes For Obelisk Awards

Each year the Business Council for the Arts presents its Obelisk Awards at a luncheon to “honor businesses, business leaders, arts/cultural leaders and nonprofit organizations who have significantly advanced arts and culture in North Texas.”

Event Co-Chairs Thai-lan Tran and Steven Roth have just announced that nominations are now open.

Exactly what does it take to be a nominee? Here’s a breakdown of the requirements for your consideration:

For Businesses:

  • The New Initiatives Award recognizes businesses for supporting an innovative arts/cultural program created within the past three years. Awards are given to one large, medium and small business each.
  • The Arts Partnerships Award recognizes businesses that have provided sustained support to an arts/cultural organization for three or more years. Awards are given to one large, medium and small business each. A business may only win the Arts Partnership Award once every two years.
  • The Arts Education Award recognizes one outstanding business for its support of arts education programs.

For Individual Business Leaders:

  • The Business Champion for the Arts Award recognizes long-term leadership and commitment to arts/culture by a business executive (president, CEO, partner).
  • The Outstanding Leadership Arts Alumnus Award recognizes outstanding board leadership and commitment by a graduate of the Leadership Arts Institute.

For Individual Arts/Cultural Leaders:

  • The Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader Award recognizes an arts leader who has consistently demonstrated vision, impact, innovation, and successful alignment with business and community partners throughout their tenure.

For Nonprofit Arts/Cultural Organizations:

  • The Distinguished Cultural Organization Award is given by Neiman Marcus to recognize one outstanding nonprofit organization for a project or program that has enhanced the community through partnership with a business.

Larry Glasgow (File photo)

According to BCA Board of Directors Chair Larry Glasgow, “For more than a quarter century, the Obelisk Awards have been the symbol of excellence recognizing support of the arts in our community.  Past recipients include visionaries who represent diverse industries, each one making a unique contribution to our cultural vibrancy and quality of life. With the exponential growth of the arts in North Texas, we believe that this year’s nominations will include long-time arts supporters as well as the new and innovative.”

The awardees will be celebrated at the 29th annual Obelisk Awards luncheon at Belo Mansion on Wednesday, November 15.

The deadline for nomination submissions is Wednesday, June 21. That’s less than a month away, so put on those thinking caps and make the world know about an art hero.  Here’s a link for the nomination form.

The Dallas Foundation Adds Four New Members To Its Board Of Governors

And the news/announcements just keeping rolling in.  The Dallas Foundation has added four new members to its board of governors. They are

James Huffines, Todd Maclin, Stephen Mansfield and Clint McDonnough*

 

  • James Huffines is “the chief operating officer of subsidiaries at Hilltop Holdings, where he oversees the activities of PlainsCapital Bank, PrimeLending, HilltopSecurities and National Lloyds and serves on the board of directors for the same. In addition to his 35 years of experience in banking, Huffines has long been a champion of causes ranging from education to arts and humanities to civic leadership. He serves on the Dallas Regional Chamber board of advisors, executive committee for the Dallas Citizens Council, and board of directors for University of Texas Development and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Foundation. He was previously a chairman of the University of Texas System board of regents, executive vice president for the Austin Symphony Orchestra board of directors, and a board member for the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and March of Dimes.”
  • Todd Maclin “held a variety of leadership positions at JPMorgan Chase for almost 37 years, rising to the rank of vice chairman and a member of the JPMC Operating Committee before his retirement in 2016. Maclin is very involved in civic pursuits and serves on numerous advisory boards and councils including the University of Texas, McCombs Graduate School of Business, UT Southwestern Health System, Peter O’Donnell Jr. Brain Institute and Southwestern Medical Foundation. Maclin and wife Diana are co-chairs of St. Philip’s School & Community Center’s ‘We Believe’ capital campaign.”
  • Stephen Mansfield “has been president and CEO of Methodist Health System in Dallas since 2006. Under his leadership, Methodist Health System has tripled in size to become one of the region’s fastest-growing health systems and gained recognition by the Dallas Business JournalModern Healthcare and Becker’s Hospital Review as a best place to work. Mansfield recently received the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award from Texas Woman’s University for leadership excellence and was the 2015 recipient of the Texas Association of Business Distinguished Business Leader Award. In 2009, Mansfield was selected as ‘Outstanding Volunteer Fundraiser’ by the March of Dimes.”
  • Clint McDonnough “served as managing partner of the Dallas office at Ernst & Young LLP until his retirement in June 2015. In addition to leading day-to-day practice, he represented Ernst & Young at numerous community events dedicated to supporting education and mentoring. McDonnough serves as a director of Dallas Regional Chamber and chairman of the Dallas Citizens Council. He holds positions on the boards of the Dallas Education Foundation and Methodist Health System, the development board for the University of Texas at Dallas, the Dallas County Community College District Foundation board, Early Matters Dallas board, and the Chief Executive Officer Advisory Council for the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Society.”

According to The Dallas Foundation President/CEO Mary Jalonick, “Each of the newly elected governors has shown an unparalleled dedication to improving Dallas for good. We’re thrilled to welcome these venerated leaders to our board of governors, and we’re confident that The Dallas Foundation will continue to thrive from their expertise and experience in the community.”

* Photos provided by The Dallas Foundation

JUST IN: Beth Myers Named CEO Of Girls Inc. Of Metropolitan Dallas

Beth Myers*

After spending nine years as Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas’ CEO, Lori Palmer slipped into retirement back in September. Now word has just arrived that Lori’s successor at Girls Inc. has been named — Beth Myers.

Prior to taking on the leadership of Girls Inc., Beth was VP of Consulting and Education for the CNM Connect (Center for Nonprofit Management). She had previously “held several roles with Big Brothers Big Sisters at both the national and affiliate level.”

According to Girls Inc. Dallas Board Chair Melanie Okon, “Beth will bring leadership and creativity to the Girls Inc. programs and a sense of commitment to the vision of a world where every girl has opportunities to break past serious obstacles and lead a healthy, educated and successful life.”

As Girls Inc. approaches its 50th year of providing “effective life skills and enrichment programs that empower girls, ages 6 to 18, to take daily charge of their lives,” Beth said she looks forward to “building consensus, teamwork and support at the local and national level, and effectively managing fiscal and operation aspects of Girls Inc as go into our 50th anniversary year and beyond.”  

* Photo provided by Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas

 

JUST IN: Dr. Linda Abraham-Silver Named New Chief Executive Officer For Perot Museum

Perot dinosaurs (File photo)

Nearly a year after its previous permanent CEO resigned, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas has named a new chief executive officer. According to a letter sent to museum donors by Perot Board Chair Hernan J.F. Saenz III, “Dr. Linda Abraham-Silver will be joining the Perot Museum as our next Eugene McDermott Chief Executive Officer, effective July 1.”

According to the letter, Abraham-Silver will arrive at the museum this summer “from the Government of Abu Dhabi, where she has led science and technology promotion initiatives for the Technology Development Committee as associate director since 2011.” Earlier, Saenz went on, she spent eight years as president and CEO of the Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland, Ohio.

The board chair said the new CEO is “perfectly aligned” with the Perot’s strategic initiatives.

“Dr. Silver’s background is impressive in its own right, but it is particularly relevant at this stage in the Museum’s evolution,” Saenz told the donors. “We are all engaged in the challenging … effort to translate the Perot Museum’s initial momentum into an engine of sustainable innovation and community impact. This requires fresh, innovate programming and exhibits, renewed and deepened community engagement across North Texas, and enhancements to the overall guest experience.”

The Perot had been led by Interim CEO Dan Kohl, since the abrupt resignation last year of chief executive Colleen Walker after less than two years on the job. According to news accounts, Walker and the museum’s board had “differences.”

JUST IN: Big Thought’s Gigi Antoni Is Heading To The Big Apple As Director Of Learning And Enrichment For The Wallace Foundation

Gigi Antoni (File photo)

Boxes of Puffs are being passed around over at Big Thought. The reason is the staff was just notified that after 20 years with the nonprofit, Big Thought President/CEO Gigi Antoni will be leaving the education organization in April. The reason is that she is moving to New York City to join The Wallace Foundation as the director of learning and enrichment.  

The Foundation’s mission “is to foster improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children and the vitality of the arts for everyone.”

Will Miller (File photo)

It was back in December 2015 that a presentation was made to a small group of area leaders addressing the problem of the Dallas education system going dormant during the summer. The research was culminated by The Wallace Foundation, the Urban Institute Policy Group and Big Thought. According to The Wallace Foundation President Will Miller, this type of situation was the reason the Foundation had spent $23M in the past decade to address such issues.

For a full release on the news, follow the jump. [Read more…]

A Gentle Reminder: Get Your Mailing And Banking Done Before Monday’s Presidents Day Holiday

If you were planning on doing some banking on Monday, rethink it because it’s a bank holiday thanks to President’s Day. But if you were expecting bills, you can rest easy because there ain’t gonna be any mail delivery either.

History lesson: President’s Day was originally held on February 22 to celebrate George Washington’s birthday. It was started in 1800 following Washington’s death in 1799. It wasn’t until the late 1870’s when it was declared an official federal holiday. But then in the late 1960s Congress got busy and created the Uniform Monday Holiday Act that “sought to shift the celebration of several federal holidays from specific dates to a series of predetermined Mondays. The proposed change was seen by many as a novel way to create more three-day weekends for the nation’s workers, and it was believed that ensuring holidays always fell on the same weekday would reduce employee absenteeism.”

For some folks, the three-day holiday has become a 3½-day holiday, since some folks took off for a very long lunch.

Barack Obama, Barbara and George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush (File photo)

If you see a U.S. President, give ‘em a kiss for the day off.

Crystal Charity Ball Newbies Were Brunched With Their New Best “Friends” At Robyn Conlon’s New Home-Sweet-Home

The last day of January could have easily been mistaken for a day in April. The sun was shining just right. The temperatures started off in the 60s and hit the high 70s. To start the day off, the Crystal Charity Ball new members (Meredith Beebe, Dianne Laroe, Kim Quinn, Lisa Singleton, Shannon Thompson, Dee Velvin and Candace Winslow) headed to Robyn Conlon’s new digs on Beverly for a get-to-know-you brunch with CCB Chair Pam Perella and her committee chiefs.

But before the newbies arrived, a photo opp of the committee was herded into the living room for a group photo. And not just any old photo.

From the left: (back row) Elizabeth Gambrell and Anne Besser; (front row) Cheryl Joiner, Leslie Diers, Kristina Whitcomb and Pam PErella

Backstory: In keeping with the CCB tradition, the year’s chair selected two themes — one for the December ball and an internal working theme. For Pam, the internal theme was favorite television programs. For Pam herself, it was “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.” For the new members, it was “The CCB Bunch,” as in “The Brady Bunch.” And for her committee, it was “Friends.”

So, with “Friends” in mind, the committee was positioned on the couch like Rachel, Monica, Phoebe, Joey, Chandler and Ross.

Tucker Enthoven,Claire Emanuelson, Lisa Longino, Susan Farris and Barbara Stuart

As soon as the final photo was snapped, the committee returned to the entry hall to greet the newbies and others like advisor Caren Kline (also on the Children’s Health Quality Board), frosh class advisors Tucker Enthoven and Susan Farris, Beneficiary Selection Chair Lisa Longino, Children’s Book Chair Elizabeth Gambrell, Silent Auction Co-Chairs Anne Besser (just selected Theta of the Year) and Cheryl Joiner, Decoration Chair Claire Emanuelson, Membership Chair Barbara Stuart, Contribution Ticket Co-Chairs Cara French and Mary Martha Pickens, Post Ball Arrangements Co-Chair Susan Glassmoyer and Public Relations Chair Pam McCallum, who had just gotten a new puppy.

From the left: (back row) Dee Velvin and Dianne Laroe; (front row) Lisa Singleton, Shannon Thompson, Kim Quinn, Candace Winslow and Meredith Beebe

As the new kids on the block arrived, they were ushered into the dining room for their individual photos to be taken by Melissa Macatee (aka Barbara Stuart’s daughter) and then directed to the staircase for a group picture or two or three. After having more photos than a college graduation, the ladies took their places for the program and brunch.

Then like sorority pledges, each of the new members was called up as their list of accomplishments was reeled off.  This was followed by the committee members taking their turns explaining their various roles.

For the vets, it was a familiar ritual and a great get-together. But as Pam recalled her frosh year 10 years ago, the get-to-know-you event could be overwhelming. On the other hand, it was just part of a great first year of making friends and raising funds for the area children’s charities.

For more photos of the ladies who brunched, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery: 2017 Crystal Charity Ball New Members Brunch

From the left: (back row) Dee Velvin and Dianne Laroe; (front row) Lisa Singleton, Shannon Thompson, Kim Quinn, Candace Winslow and Meredith Beebe

The weather couldn’t have been more perfect on Tuesday, January 31, for brunching on Beverly Drive for the frosh class of Crystal Charity Ball. And, no, it wasn’t at the Dallas Country Club. Instead Robyn Conlon had 2017 CCB Chair Pam Perella, her committee and the new members (Meredith Beebe, Dianne Laroe, Kim Quinn, Lisa Singelton, Shannon Thompson, Dee Velvin and Candace Winslow) in for a get-to-know-ya brunch at tables throughout the rooms overlooking Beverly.

From the left: (back row) Elizabeth Gambrell and Anne Besser; (front row) Cheryl Joiner, Leslie Diers, Kristina Whitcomb and Pam Perella

Before the new-kids-on-the-block arrived, the Pam and her executive committee had a group photo taken ala “Friends.” What’s with the “Friends” and why were the newbies tagged as “The CCB Bunch? Just wait til the write-up is posted. Until then, check out the oldies and newbies at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.  

How About A Whopper Of A Valentine’s Day Floral Arrangement?

Tuesday is Valentine’s Day and it’s to florists what the Super Bowl is to pizza shops. And like pizza, the usual dozen long stem, red roses will be history all too soon. Still, it’s the thought that counts.

But how about a gift of flowers that lasts all year round for the recipient? And the price is less than $100.

Dallas Arboretum (File photo)

It’s an individual membership at the Dallas Arboretum. Not only does it allow the lucky recipient free access to the more-than-60 acres of grounds overlooking White Rock Lake, it also provides a guest to come along free and free parking for one vehicle plus four total reservations to the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden.

And if you want to look like a really big spender, you might want to check out the other levels of membership.

While you’re being such a sweetheart, why not share your love with a child you don’t know but who sure could use that special feeling? You don’t even need a stamp to lick…just a finger to click here!

Mary Kay Inc.’s Inaugural Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit Had Business Vets Providing Insight And Opportunities For Business Women

When Mary Kay’s Inaugural Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit convened at the Fairmont on Friday, January 27, for an all-day crash course on business development and growth, they literally got more than an “earful” about innovative opportunities and success stories. In fact the day’s Pink Tank proved that point to the letter, thanks to Elyse Dickerson of Eosera, whose pitch had everyone listening. Here’s a report from the field:

Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit*

Two hundred women entrepreneurs attended the Inaugural Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit, presented by Mary Kay Inc. in partnership with the Dallas Entrepreneur Center (The DEC), on Friday, January 27, at the Fairmont Hotel.

As perhaps the #1 creator of women entrepreneurs in the world, Mary Kay designed the summit to convene experts and thought leaders to help encourage and inspire participants’ own business journey, and to provide them with the tools to take their company and themselves as a leader to the next level and stage of development and growth.

The day began with keynote speaker Gloria Mayfield Banks, Mary Kay Independent Elite National Sales Director in the United States, followed by three breakout sessions with the common thread of “Why Women Make Great Entreprenuers.” 

Breakout session*

Breakout speakers included Caytie Langford of Caytie Langford and Associates, Valerie Freeman of Imprimis Group, Mary Kay Independent Senior National Sales Director Cindy Williams, Mary Kay Independent Executive National Sales Director Stacy James, Yasmeen Tadia of Make Your Life Sweeter, private consultant Liz Marshall, Sheryl Chamberlain of Cap Gemini, Jill Scigliano of Dallas Entrepreneur Center and Mary Kay Independent National Sales Director Emeritus Karen Piro and Kristina Libby, S.W.C./SoCu.

Ingrid Vandervelt, Crayton Webb and Gloria Mayfield Banks*

The group then reconvened for a seated lunch and a keynote address by Ingrid Vandervelt, Founder and Chairman of Empowering a Billion Women by 2020, before enjoying afternoon breakout sessions designed around the theme “How to Become a Great Entrepreneur.” Afternoon breakout session speakers were entrepreneur/Junior League of Dallas representative Heather Bonfield, Mary Kay Inc. Chief Marketing Officer Sheryl Adkins-Green, Heather Capps of HCK2, Holly Mason of Mason Baronet, Jessica Nunez of True Point, Julia Taylor Cheek of Everly, Louise Kee of Golden Seeds, Cynthia Nevels of Integrality, Cristin Thomas of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses and Management Consulting’s Melissa Youngblood, LCC.

One of the highlights of the day followed, the Pink Tank business pitch session, with an all-star panel of judges: Sheryl Adkins-Green, The DEC Founder/CEO Trey Bowles, fashion designer/CEO Abi Ferrin, Mark Cuban Companies Director of Business Development Abe Minkara and City of Irving Mayor Beth Van Duyne.  Five women business owners vied for the chance to win $5,000 in startup money from the Dallas Entrepreneur Center, with Elyse Dickerson of Eosera taking home the prize.

Trey Bowles, Sheryl Adkins-Green, Elyse Dickerson, Beth Van Duyne, Abi Ferrin and Abe Minkara*

The day concluded with a “Champs and Candy” celebratory reception with champagne, cotton candy-infused sparkling water, and sweet and savory popcorn by Make Your Life Sweeter.

* Photo provided by Mary Kay Inc.

A Passing: Cherri Oakley

Before the women’s movement really started with Gloria Steinem hammering at the glass ceiling, Cherri Oakley was a hungry 20-something PR person who had gumption and could scramble. So the story goes, international hairstylist Vidal Sassoon decided to open a shop in Dallas in the early 1970s. Somehow Cherri got wind of Sassoon’s plans and managed to set up a meeting with his people. There was just one hiccup. Cherri didn’t have an office. But she wasn’t going to let that quash the opportunity. The fledgling PR practitioner temporarily rented space just to take the meeting and make the right appearance. It worked! Sassoon hired her and she was off and running to become a major player in the local PR biz.

Over the years, even Cherri had to laugh about the ups and downs of PR that fluctuated with North Texas’ business climate. When times were good, Cherri had a huge conference table. When times weren’t so great, the conference table hit the road. She had more than a couple of conference tables, so they say.

There is a great story in D Magazine about Cherri’s buying three spaces at Sparkman Hillcrest for $250 each in 1985. Her plan was one for herself and one for a maybe-one-day husband. In 1986 her beloved pooch, Roberta Black, died. Cherri decided that Roberta would find her final resting place in one of the plots. Alas, the Sparkman-Hillcrest policy would not allow it — “burying animals was against Sparkman policy.” Somehow, Cherri had her way — “We had to be discreet about it, but it was a very moving funeral.”

Cherri Oakley*

As time moved on and Cherri decided a Mr. Right was not going be in her life, she decided to sell the two remaining plots back to Sparkman-Hillcrest in 2008. But, alas, Sparkman-Hillcrest would “not buy them back.” Cherri was amazed to learn that her two spots were now valued at $7,590 each.

It is with regret that Cherri may be putting to use one of her Sparkman-Hillcrest spaces due to her death on Friday, January 20. And while Cherri’s 40 years in public relations may have ended, stories — both real and tall tale — will be the stuff that will allow her to live on in the annals of Dallas marketing circles.

A memorial service for Cherri will be held at Saint Michael and All Angel’s Saint Michael Chapel on Saturday, February 4, at 11 a.m.

* Photo credit: Matt Hawthorne

A Passing: Robert S. Folsom

Not all the news today is wonderful. One of Dallas’ legendary leaders died Tuesday, January 24 — former Mayor Robert “Bob” Folsom. His 89 years of life bridged generations with successes and accomplishments.

Robert and Margaret Folsom*

There were his years at SMU where he played football alongside Doak Walker and Kyle Rote and lettered in four sports (basketball, football, track and baseball). There was his more-than-successful career in real estate that provided a wealth of experience and knowledge that would serve as a catalyst later. There were his years on the Dallas Independent School District’s school board, where he was first a board member and then president. And there were the years (1976-1981) when he was mayor of Dallas, during which his business acumen helped him energize the community’s growth for both the corporate and nonprofit sector.

And the city and university recognized and saluted his contributions with numerous awards and acknowledgments: the SMU Edwin L. Cox  School of Business Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1995, SMU Letterman’s Association Silver Anniversary Mustang Award in 1991, J. Erik Jonsson Aviation Award in 1990, Dallas Commercial Real Estate Hall of Fame – inductee in 1989, Entrepreneur of the Year – SMU School of Business in 1984, Headliner of the Year – Dallas Press Club in 1981, James K. Wilson Art Award – Contribution to the betterment of the arts in 1980, Distinguished Alumni Award of Southern Methodist University in 1975, and  NCAA Silver Anniversary Award – College Athletics’ Top Ten in 1975.

It was only appropriate that the Robert S. Folsom Leadership Award was established by Methodist Health System Foundation “to recognize individuals whose demonstrate commitment and excellence in community leadership emulating the achievements of former Dallas Mayor Robert S. Folsom.”

But most importantly there was his family. From his marriage in 1949 to his “childhood sweetheart” the late Margaret Dalton Folsom to his three children (Steve Folsom, Diane Frank and Debbie Jarma) and their famlies, Bob knew he had the best in his life right at home. In turn, his children have carried on the legacy of giving back to the community and celebrating the greatness of Dallas.

* Photo courtesy of Methodist Health System Foundation

Dr. Dan DeMarco Got Pretty Gutsy At The Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Luncheon

The word “gut” is usually not one that comes up at lunch. But on Tuesday, December 13, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board literally gutted up to learn about gastrointestinal research and developments.

Paula Walker

Ashley Jones

But before it kicked off, the Board members were entertained by musicians and artists like Ashley Jones from Baylor’s Arts in Medicine program at Sammons Cancer Center. Developed by Bonnie Pittman, the program is provided free-of-charge for cancer patients at Baylor as a creative therapy thanks to a donation by Paula Walker. Another part of the program is for musicians to play at bedside. When the program began in 2015, there were 300 requests for musical practitioners. This past year the monthly rate had risen to more than 2,000.

Margo Goodwin, Leonard Riggs and Annette Simmons

Amy Turner

Jerry Fullinwider and Martha Hackbarth

As guests like Nancy Dedman, Kelly Green, Richard Holt, Kathy Crow, Michal Powell, Amy Turner, Julie Turner, Su-Su Meyer, Leonard Riggs, Annette Simmons, Jerry Fullinwider, Martha Hackbarth, Trisha Wilson, Randi Halsell, Jill Smith, Paul Stoffel, Sharon McCullough, ­­­Lana and Barry Andrews and Tavia Hunt settled in their chairs at the Sammons Cancer Center, Foundation Chair Margo Goodwin reported that Celebrating Women Luncheon Chair Aileen Pratt and Underwriting Chair Gloria Eulich Martindale had raised $1.8M for breast cancer research. Taking over the leadership for the 2017 Celebrating Women will be Tucker Enthoven as luncheon chair and Ola Fojasek as underwriting chair. 

Aileen Pratt

Tavia Hunt

With tongue firmly in cheek, Margo explained that due to the day’s subject matter the presentation would be held after the meal was consumed.

No need. For the presentation, Margo and Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson had gotten retired Dr. Dan DeMarco to explain the various components of the digestive system. In introducing Dan, Robin admitted that he had done research by reading “Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ” by Giulia Enders. He described it as “a really cheeky, easy-to-read guide about both the secrets and the science of our digestive system. I recommend it. It’s a neat read.”

Dan DeMarco

And, yes, the topic did have a “yuck factor” about it, but with the charm of a leprechaun and the knowledge and skill of a recognized health care provider, Dan took the SRO crowd through the various steps of the gastrointestinal system, or as Robin put it, “from stem to stern.”

 Dan started off by recalling years ago, an Australian doctor — Dr. Barry Marshall — claimed that bacteria, not acid, caused ulcers. Experts poo-pooed the idea, despite the doctor’s even swallowing bacteria to prove his point. Years later, he was proved right and won the 2005 Noble Prize.  

In addition to “Gut,” Dan suggested another book that was easy-to-read-and-digest: “Gulp” by Mary Roach.

Then he rolled out some facts that impressed one and all.

  • 80% of our immune cells reside in the gut
  • The gut sends emotional signal to the brain — suggesting we “feel” with our gut first.
  • Gastro-intestinal conditions can be seen as the “mental illness” of your gut.
  • Food affects your mood, and not just “comfort food.”
  • You have 10 times as many microbes as cells in your body. The health of these communities determines your overall health. Collectively, these communities are called the microbiome.
  • Digestive insufficiencies contribute to a wide range of health issues, including migraine headaches, depression, arthritis, autism, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, multiple sclerosis and more.
  • Lactose intolerance increases with age.
  • Gluten sensitivity is “relatively rare. It has to be confirmed with blood testing and intestinal biopsy. Certainly people do feel different on a gluten-free diet. People swear by it, but it’s probably not just the gluten. It’s due to other factors.”
  • Antibiotics kill bacteria. With the wide-spread use of antibiotics, the few bacteria that the antibiotics don’t kill get stronger, become resistant and become super bugs. Not everything should be treated with antibiotics.
  • Probiotics encourage the growth of good bacteria that help the digestive system.
  • Microbiome is the entire community of germs. By analyzing the microbiome, it is possible to create an individual’s “fingerprint” regarding their makeup. For instance, if antibiotics are given the first two or three years of life, they influence the microbiome.
  • Microbiome may have more of an effect on our makeup and well-being than genetics.
  • Diseases like Parkinsons, Lupus and others may be the result of the microbiome.
  • Microbiome is affected by whether you were born via C-section or natural delivery and if you were breast fed.
  • The gut affects the immune system, moods, personality and attitude. About 95% of the body’s serotonin is found in the gut. The gut is sometimes referred to as “The Second Brain.”
  • The small intestine is 21 feet long, which results in food taking about six hours to reach the colon.

The small intestine’s length was one of the challenges that had faced the medical community in detecting health problems. It was only accessible via the operating room. The traditional colonoscopy could only go so far, Dan said, but he had been involved in the creation of a new treatment combining the Double Balloon Scope and Spiral Component being “dropped from the top down.” The result was the shortening of the intestine “like rolling up your sleeve.” This procedure made it possible for the small intestine to be examined without trauma and reduced the six-hour traditional examination to a mere 30 minutes. It is currently going through national clinical trials for approval.

Another developments that is being tested at Baylor is the TransPyloric Shuttle for moderately overweight people and fecal transplants for colon diseases.

In conclusion, Dan discussed the gastroenterologist fellows program at Baylor in which, each year, two are selected to be part of the three-year program after finishing their training as internal medicine doctors. Emphasizing the need for gastroenterologists, he added that those participating in the fellowship program tended to stay locally.

To summarize his presentation, he suggested three take-home points:

  1. Think outside of the box
  2. Embrace new technology
  3. Keep learning, keep teaching and “support our fellowship program.”

Upon his retirement, Dan and his wife, Dr. Cara East, created an endowment to support a fellowship and, thanks to the Baylor Health Care System Foundation, more than a million dollars was raised resulting in the DeMarco Fellow each year that is fully funded.

Jim Turner and Joel Allison

Following Dan’s presentation, Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees Chair Jim Turner told the foundation board members about the new Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Jim Hinton and extolled the accomplishments of retiring Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Joel Allison. Among them: during Joel’s 23-year tenure, he grew Baylor from a $1-billion asset healthcare system to $10 billion today; the merger with Scott & White; heading up 45,000 employees, 48 hospitals and countless other undertakings resulting in Baylor being one of the top ten not-for-profit healthcare companies in the country and the leading not-for-profit in Texas.

While Joel will officially retire on his birthday (Wednesday, February 1), he will remain as an advisor to Jim Turner. This relationship dates back to their days at Baylor University, when Jim was on the basketball team and Joel played football.

JUST IN: Crystal Charity Ball Names Annette Simmons As Lifetime Advisory Board Member, Rob Bowlby And Francie Moody-Dahlberg To Board

As the Crystal Charity Ball 100 are going through the final stages of selecting the 2017 beneficiaries, 2017 CCB Chair Pam Perella has just revealed that for only the second time in the 65-year-old organization’s history has a Lifetime Advisory Board Member been named — Annette Simmons.

Annette Simmons (File photo)

Ruth Altshuler (File photo)

The only other person receiving this designation is Ruth Altshuler.

Rob Bowlby (File photo)

Francie Moody-Dahlberg (File photo)

Pam also announced that BT&T North Texas President Rob Bowlby and Moody Foundation Executive Director Francie Moody-Dahlberg will be joining the CCB advisory board that presently consists of Elaine Agather, Barry Andrews, Ralph Babb, Keith Cargill, Jason Downing, James Dunn, Kent Eastman, Lauren Embrey, Linda Perryman Evans, Paul Fields, Jacqueline Fojtasek, Paul Harris, Fred Hegi, Sally Hoglund, Richard Holt, Norma Hunt, Gene Jones, Jerry Meyer, David Miller, Caren Prothro, David Rosenberg, Carl Sewell, Randall Stephenson, Lisa Troutt, Jim Turner, Courtney Wang, Alan White and Sharon Worrell.

BTW, the beneficiaries will be selected on Thursday, February 2, with fundraising efforts officially commencing on Thursday, February 23. Mark Saturday, December 2, for the annual black-tie fundraiser for local children’s charities.

Female Business Successes Will Share Lessons, Secrets And Pink Tank Opportunities At The Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit

It is truly hard for some to believe that there was once a time when girls were raised to have no greater aspirations than to be wives and moms. Seriously, it made sense. Taking care of the home and the children is a monumental task. But then there were situations when the household income was lacking, either because the man of the house was unable to provide or there was no longer a man of the house around. Women found themselves out in the work force, many without any training or mentoring. One such woman was Mary Kathlyn Wagner. To provide for her three children and herself while her husband was serving in World War II, she found herself selling books door-to-door. When he returned, they divorced and she worked for other companies only find herself being passed over for promotion in favor of less qualified men.

While most women would have thrown in the towel and just accepted what would become known as the glass ceiling, Mary Kathlyn took up the challenge of becoming her own boss in 1963. Despite the death of her second husband and with only $5,000 in the bank, she started Mary Kay. And, as they say, the rest is history.

In addition to creating a cosmetics empire, she was one of those pioneers that, along with the women’s movement, supportive husbands and technology, provided women with the opportunity, if they wanted, to pursue a career and, yes, possibly own businesses.

Despite Mary Kay’s death in 2001, that respect for and support of women in business continues on today in Mary Kay Inc. and The Mary Kay Foundation. To provide the tools to be entrepreneurs, Mary Kay Inc. is partnering up with The Dallas Entrepreneur Center (The DEC) for the first annual Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit on Friday, January 27 at the Fairmont Hotel Dallas. From 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., experts and thought leaders with backgrounds in fashion, high technology, consumer-packaged goods and business services” will mentor, guide, teach and share their secrets to success.

Sheryl Adkins-Green*

According to Mary Kay Inc Chief Marketing Officer Sheryl Adkins-Green, “For 53 years Mary Kay has been empowering, mentoring and promoting women entrepreneurs. Our founder, Mary Kay Ash herself, was one of the greatest business minds of all time and millions of women around the world have built successful businesses by following her proven leadership and sales techniques. No one person or company has more experience with women’s entrepreneurship than Mary Kay Inc. We believe that the Women’s Entrepreneurship Summit will help inspire current and future female entrepreneurs.”

So, what’s on the Summit schedule?  

Throughout the day there will be mentorship opportunities and “breakout sessions, which have been customized for entrepreneurs of all ages and stages and will include case studies, how to’s and tools to take your company to the next level.”

Some of the breakout session topics and speakers will include:

  • Why Women Make Great Entrepreneurs:  Amber Venz Box of RewardStyle and Valerie Freeman of Imprimis Group
  • 10 Questions You Need To Answer Before You Become An Entrepreneur:  Shama Hyder of Marketing Zen and Yasmeen Tadia of Make Your Life Sweeter
  • How To Build the Best Team For Success: Sheryl Chamberlain of Cap Gemini and Kristi Libby of S.W.C./SoCu and Jill Scigliano of Dallas Entrepreneur Center
  • Customer Development: How To Find And Grow Customers:  Melissa Youngblood of LCC Management Consulting
  • Building Your Brand:  Heather Capps of HCK2, Holly Mason of Mason Baronet and Jessica Nunez of  True Point
  • Fundraising: How To Fund Your Business: Julia Taylor Cheek of Everly, Louise Kee of Golden Seeds, Cynthia Nevels of Integrality and Cristin Thomas of Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses

As for food for the mind and tummy, there will be a light breakfast followed by the morning’s keynote speaker: internationally renowned motivational speaker/#1 U.S. Ranked Mary Kay Independent Elite Executive National Sales Director Gloria Mayfield Banks.

Gloria Mayfield Banks*

Ingrid Vandervelt*

At the seated luncheon, Empowering A Billion Women by 2020, Founder/Chair Ingrid Vandervelt will be the keynote speaker.

Following the sessions will be the first-ever “Pink Tank” providing the opportunity for pre-selected participants to fast pitch their business ideas to Mary Kay Inc.’s Adkins-Green, Mark Cuban Companies Business Development Director Abe Minkara and CEO/fashion designer Abi Ferrin for seeding from The DEC.

Registration fees are $125 per person in advance and $150 at the door.

Ladies, you’ve come a long way since Mary Kay sold books door-to-door. The future is yours.

* Photos provided by Mary Kay Inc.

News 8 Daybreak’s Alexa Conomos May Be Leaving WFAA And News 8 Daybreak But Not The Nonprofits

Alexa Conomos (File photo)

For those nonprofits who worried their botoxed brows about word that WFAA’s News 8 Daybreak’s Alexa Conomos was leaving WFAA’s morning show, take a chill pill.

It was 16 or so years ago that Alexa’s journey from California brought her to North Texas and TXCN. Then, as TXCN went bye-bye in 2002, Alexa transitioned to co-anchoring with Ron Corning to wake folks up from 4:30 a.m. to 7 a.m.

Over the years, Alexa personally went from adorable single girl to glowing married lady to multi-tasking mama of three. In recent months, Alexa realized that her priorities needed a revisit and that making breakfast for her kidlets and having date nights with her hubby Bradley trumped all.

Luckily knowing Alexa, her support of the North Texas nonprofit world will continue beyond her days at the conclusion of her contract with WFAA in June.

JUST IN: New Crystal Charity Ball Members Announced

2017 Crystal Charity Ball Chair Pam Perella just revealed the seven new members of the 65-year-old children’s nonprofit fundraising organization. The frosh class includes the following:

Dianne LaRoe (File photo)

Lisa Singleton (File photo)

Candace Winslow (File photo)

  • Meredith Miller BeBee,
  • Dianne Bradshaw LaRoe,
  • Kim Novel Quinn,
  • Lisa Bailey Singleton,
  • Shannon Saalfield Thompson,
  • Dee Dunk Velvin and
  • Candace Plummer Winslow

The work is already underway for the black-tie gala on Saturday, December 2, at the Hilton Anatole. Next on the agenda is the selection/announcement of the 2017 beneficiaries and the goal.

JUST IN: Equest To Sell Wylie Property, Add Al Hill Jr. Family Arena At Texas Horse Park Facility With Completion Slated For Fall 2017

Equest just revealed a big reduction and expansion of its physical operation. The reduction is the putting up for sale its Wylie property. Despite the “For Sale” sign, it will continue operating from Friday, January 27, thru Saturday, May 13. Handling the sale will be Dave Perry-Miller and Associates’ Andy Steingasser, who is also Equest’s chairman of the board. Just to keep this above board, Andy is donating 100% of his commission to Equest.

Heather Washburne, Al Hill Jr. and Elisa Summers (File photo)

On the other hand, Equest’s expansion will be the addition of a new state-of-the-art arena at its Texas Horse Park facility. Named Al Hill Jr. Family Arena, the new arena will allow the organization to be “a closer step to Equest’s vision to be a model of excellence for worldwide therapeutic riding center. The beautiful energy-efficient clearspan steel covered arena will feature wooden kick boards, a blended equestrian-specific footage, large industrial fans, high-tech audio capabilities, and a platform for announcers and judges. It will increase opportunities for Equest to serve more clients and amplify outreach programming with the Dallas Independent School District, as well as additional audiences and organizations.”

According to Andy, “Al Hill Jr. is a Dallas businessman whom [sic] has had an interest in horses all of his life. Having an involvement using equestrian programs which benefits military veterans and especially handicapped children is a perfect combination of his personal interest. Having a distinguished arena that has multi-use functionality and accessibility will not only impact Equest but also the City of Dallas. We look forward to sharing more details in the coming weeks.”

Plans presently call for a March groundbreaking with completion slated for this fall.