JUST IN: The Dallas Opera’s GM/CEO Keith Cerny Resigns To Head Up Calgary Opera

Keith and Jennifer Cerny (File photo)

The Dallas Opera‘s GM/CEO Keith Cerny has just turned in his resignation to take over the position of general director/CEO of Calgary Opera in January.

During his seven-and-a-half years with the Dallas company, Keith presided over five consecutive balanced operating budgets and a host of artistic projects, expansions, and technical innovations.  These include a highly-successful simulcast program; regional, U.S. and world premieres; and innovative community outreach programs.  

According to Dallas Opera Board Chair Holly Mayer, “Keith has every reason to be proud of his legacy. We wish him every success with his new responsibilities as we turn our efforts to maintaining this company’s impressive forward momentum and strengthening the collaborations with other arts organizations that have marked Keith’s tenure here in Dallas.”

Dallas’ loss is Calgary’s gain.

Stella Wrubel, Quinn Graves And Their MistleCrew Want You To Kiss-Off Hunger With Jingle Bell Mistletoe Starting Friday

The countdown is underway for Christmas. It’s ten days filled with parties, gift wrapping, cooking and kissing. Whoa! What was the last one? Yup. Kissing. There are all types of smooching. There’s the air kiss, the pucker planting, the kiss blowing, the hand kissing, the cheek pecking and the blissful buss to name a few.

Quinn and Stella’s Jingle Bell Mistletoe*

But this indoor/outdoor activity can be enhanced with a little inspiring decoration like mistletoe. While the greenery may be considered a parasitic plant to a tree, it is the seasonal good luck charm for a lucky locking of the lips.

And if you don’t want to haul out the extension ladder and perhaps break a bone or two by cutting some greenery out of the trees, 12-year-olds Stella Wrubel, Quinn Graves, Isabella Dickason, Trevor Godkin and their MistleCrew have it all under control.

Starting Friday, their Jingle Bell Mistletoe will be back in operation for a fifth year selling mistletoe with the hope of raising $60,000 for the North Texas Food Bank to feed 180,000 children in North Texas. Just last year, Stella and Quinn were awarded the North Texas Food Bank’s Golden Fork for their seasonal project.

Stuart Reeves, Quinn Graves, Lucy and Steve Wrubel, Stella Wrubel, Jennie Reeves and Katherine Reeves (File photo)

Here is the schedule for the pop-up plant stations:

  • Highland Park Village
    • Friday, December 15: 2 to 5 p.m.
    • Saturday, December 16: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Sunday, December 17: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Monday, December 18: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Dallas Farmers Market on Saturday, December 16, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

xxoo

* Photo provided by Jingle Bell Mistletoe

Kyle Taylor To Take Over For Retiring Irving Cares CEO Teddie Story

Kyle Taylor*

Some folks didn’t know much about Irving in 1957. It wouldn’t pop up on their radar until the Cowboys moved from the Cotton Bowl to the “state-of-the-art” Texas Stadium in Irving. But the Irving residents were already addressing “the social welfare of the needy people in their community.” To help those facing financial crisis, the seeds of Irving Cares were sown.

Its success was based on a dedicated staff and a compassionate team of volunteers. In July 2010 a fellow by the name of Kyle Taylor joined up as a volunteer in the Employment Services Program. In less than two years, he was named “Volunteer of the Year.”

His efforts impressed the Irving Cares staff so much that they hired him to be Coordinator of Volunteers, “where each year he has managed a food pantry that serves thousands of Irving resident and supervised hundreds of volunteers.”

Teddie Story*

Once again his work led to his being named Community Engagement Director, “working to build mutually beneficial relationships with a diverse set of community partners.”

Now, word has arrived that Irving Cares CEO Teddie Story is retiring this month after starting off as a volunteer in 1991 and, like Kyle rising through the ranks.

Carrying on in Teddie’s place will be… yup, Kyle.

According to Teddie, “The staff, volunteers, donors and customers of Irving Cares will be well represented by Kyle Taylor as the next Chief Executive Officer. His passion for service to others is evident in his dedication to Irving Cares and its customers.”

Congratulations to both Teddie and Kyle for showing that being a volunteer can lead to even greater things.

* Photo provided by Irving Cares

JUST IN: 2017 Crystal Charity Ball’s 452-Page “Children’s Book” Is Unveiled Today Thanks To Wells Fargo Private Bank

Today the Crystal Charity Ball elves committee members donned their “Alpine” sweaters and started schlepping flowers, favors and all kinds of goodies at the Anatole in preparation for Saturday night’s “Evening in the Alps.”

In addition to the activity, 2017 CCB Underwriting Chair Leslie Diers revealed a first for CCB. According to Leslie, the legendary “Children’s Book” that will be given to guests was being sponsored by Wells Fargo Private Bank.

Leslie Diers, Phil White, Pam Perella and Elizabeth Gambrell

On hand for the delivery and the unveiling of the 452-page book by 2017 CCB Chair Pam Perella and 2017 “Children’s Book Chair” Elizabeth Gambrell was Wells Fargo Private Bank DFW and Oklahoma Regional Director Phil White.

If you’re one of the lucky ones to get one of these keepsakes, you’ll have a wonderful time checking the beautiful photos of area children photographed and donated by John Derryberry Photography, James French Photography, Gittings and Haynsworth Classic American Portraiture.

Boston Symphony Orchestra’s Kim Noltemy Selected To Be President/CEO Of Dallas Symphony Association

While all types of stuff are happening in the Dallas arts neighborhood like Dallas Museum of Arts Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Gavin Delahunty‘s unexpected resignation, the Dallas Symphony Association have good news with the announcement of a new president/CEO, who will be in place on Monday, January 22.  Dallas Symphony Association board of Governors Chair Sanjiv Yajnik announced that Kim Noltemy has been selected to head up the DSO.

Sanjiv Yajnik*

Kim Noltemy*

Having been associated with the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1996, where she held various positions including Director of Sales and Marketing, Chief Marketing Officer and most recently Chief Operation and Communications Officers.

She has also served as president of the non-profit Boston 4 Celebration that produces Boston’s ever popular Fourth of July festivities.  

According to Sanjiv, “Kim comes to the Dallas Symphony with decades of experience at one of the world’s top orchestras. She combines a profound knowledge of orchestra management with a stellar reputation for growing an orchestra’s brand in and beyond its hometown. We welcome Kim to Dallas, and we look forward to working with her to continue the DSO’s commitment to artistic excellence, while reimagining what an orchestra can be.”

Jonathan Martin (File photo)

Michelle Miller Burns (File photo)

Since former DSA President/CEO Jonathan Martin’s announcement of his departure in June, Michelle Miller Burns has served as Interim President/CEO. Plans call for her to “continue as Executive Vice President for Institutional Advancement and Chief Operating Officer. She will work closely with Yajnik and Noltemy to ensure a seamless transition.”

* Photo provided by Dallas Symphony Association

SOLD-OUT ALERT!: 2017 Obelisk Award Luncheon

Business Council for the Arts Katherine Wagner just sent some good news and some not-so-good news. First, let’s get the not-so-good news over with. If you were waiting until the last minute to get your spot at the Obelisk Award Luncheon, you waited too long and you’re out of luck.

2017 Obelisk Award (File photo)

Now for the good news: The November 15th lunch at Belo Mansion is sold out.  

But you were really hankering to be part of the occasion, you know better than anyone that Katherine could find one more place if the check is written with the right amount. Wink, wink.

JUST IN: New Cattle Baron’s Ball Members Revealed

Even before the Ferris wheel at the 2017 Cattle Baron’s Ball had made its final pass on Saturday, October 21, the 2018 CBB team under the leadership of Katy Bock and Jonika Nix was in action. One of the first items on the agenda was the announcement of the CBB’s newest members. Since committee membership is limited to 100, the number of newbies is limited to the vacancies created by oldtimers retiring.

From the left: (standing) Jill Ritchey, Alexine Cryer, Melissa Pastora, Claudia Williams, Brittany Smalley, Mackenzie Wallace, Kelley Ledford, Kristen Gibbins, Suzi LeBeau and Lauren Phillips; (seated) Rachel Osburn, Tara Versfelt, Jonika Nix, Katy Bock, Catherine Flagg and Jennifer Burns

This year’s new crop of cancer-fighters was just revealed including Jennifer Burns, Alexine Cryer, Catherine Flagg, Kristen Gibbins, Lisa Hewitt, Suzi LeBeau, Kelley Ledford, Rachel Osburn, Melissa Pastora, Lauren Phillips, Jill Ritchey, Brittany Smalley, Tara Versfelt, Mackenzie Wallace and Claudia Williams.

JUST IN: Baylor Scott And White’s Kristi Sherrill Hoyl Adds Overseeing Healthcare’s Foundations And Community Relation Activities To Her Responsibilities

While preparing for Wednesday night’s ReuNight, Co-Chair Kristi Sherrill Hoyl was also expanding her responsibilities at Baylor Scott and White Health. She’s been with the healthcare system for the past 13 years, during which time she’s held the position of Chief Government Affairs Officer, setting up “the system’s legislative agenda and ensured that policy makers understood the implications of various legislation on the organization’s ability to serve.”

It was during that time that the merger between Baylor Health Care System merged with Scott and White Healthcare resulting in Baylor Scott and White Health — the largest not-for-profit healthcare system in Texas.

Kristi Sherrill Hoyl (File photo)

Jim Hinton (File photo)

In her “free time,” Kristi’s been heavily involved with numerous nonprofits and community organizations like Downtown Dallas Inc. and the Cotton Bowl Association. In 2010, she chaired the Cattle Baron’s Ball at Southfork benefiting the American Cancer Society. 

It was just announced that Baylor Scott and White CEO Jim Hinton has named her “Chief Policy, Government and Community Affairs Officer.” In her new role she will be “overseeing the four Baylor Scott and White foundations, all of the system’s community relations activities, and will continue to oversee government affairs.”

Congrats to Kristi, Jim and Baylor!

Actress/Advocate Geena Davis Was Part Of The Top-Tier Panel For The Dallas-Fort Worth Comerica Bank Women’s Business Symposium

Comerica provided 500 gals the opportunity to hear from a top-tier line up of females about the challenges, opportunities and advances for women in business. On hand to be part of the panel on Friday, October 13, at the Dallas Mariott Las Colinas was actress/advocate Geena Davis, who created the Geena Davis Institute on Gender. But it was more than listening and learning. It was also celebrated with a nice check presentation for ChildCareGroup. Here’s a report from the field:

Five hundred guests gathered to learn, connect and grow at the inaugural  Dallas-Fort Worth Comerica Bank Women’s Business Symposium, a sellout, on Friday, October 13, at the Dallas Marriott Las Colinas.

Julia Wellborn, Nina Vaca, Deborah Gibbins, Geena Davis and Jennifer Sampson*

Geena Davis, award-winning actress and founder of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, headlined the event, while the luncheon opened with a local Power Panel featuring Deborah Gibbins – CFO, Mary Kay Inc.; Barbara Lynn – Chief District Judge, United States District Court for Northern District of Texas; Jennifer Sampson – CEO and President, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas; and Nina Vaca – Chairman and CEO, Pinnacle Group / Comerica Incorporated Board of Director Member.

Jamie Gwen*

Peter Sefzik*

Long-time California Comerica Women’s Business Symposium emcee Celebrity Chef Jamie Gwen made sure the jam-packed program flowed smoothly with Texas Market President Peter Sefzik on-hand to welcome guests and share how Comerica is not only investing in women externally, but also internally with professional development opportunities for its colleagues.

The Power Panel moderated by Julia Wellborn, Comerica Bank’s Executive Director of Wealth Management, proved to be a lively discussion and dialogue — the panelists covered a variety of topics from mentoring, landing that coveted seat at the table to how they have dealt with gender discrimination.  They also provided insight on their road to success and the importance of helping other women succeed.  

Vaca applauded Comerica Bank Chairman and CEO Ralph Babb for his commitment to empowering women and fostering an environment for them to succeed. Comerica Inc. recently appointed its third female, president and CEO of Commercial Metals Company Barbara R. Smith, to its Board of Directors, which also includes Vaca and Jacqueline P. Kane, retired Executive Vice President of Human Resources and Corporate Affairs at The Clorox Company.

Davis then shared her perspective on gender equality and why it should matter to us all with the underlying theme that if women are seen in certain positions and/or roles, it encourages other girls and women to pursue these opportunities / careers.  She also highlighted a few key studies conducted by the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media that indicated there still is a significant gender gap in the entertainment and media industries as it relates to casting roles and featuring women in a non-traditional sense in media campaigns.

Margareth Aviles, Tori Mannes, Catherine Pistor and Julia Wellborn*

Haynes & Boone, Winstead PC and Bodman PC sponsored the Women’s Business Symposium — a portion of the event proceeds benefited the ChildCareGroup. Comerica North Texas Women’s Initiative representatives presented Tori Mannes, the CEO of the ChildCareGroup, with a check for $10,000. The ChildCareGroup provides or manages the early care and education for more than 14,000 Dallas-area children from low-income families. Because of donor support, these children have better learning environments; well-educated, caring teachers; and involved parents—key components to a good start in life and a solid foundation for the future.

The Women’s Business Symposium concluded with an open networking reception, providing an opportunity for guests to mix, mingle and exchange business cards and contact information in support of helping each other further their careers and personal growth.

* Photo credit: Lisa Means

The Harvey Weinsteins Aren’t Limited To Hollywood

MySweetCharity

Allow me to tell you a story: There was a young woman who had been doing PR for a high-profile local company back in the late 1980s. As part of her responsibilities, she was to accompany the executives and personalities to special events and introduce them to the right people. 

It was at one large charity fundraiser that her “#Me too” took place. As the crowd gathered to hear the headliner, she stood next to the region’s top executive. Without warning he grabbed her hand and clutched it to his crotch. While there wasn’t much there, she still knew what had happened. Shocked, she looked at him and saw a smile, not of enjoyment but of conquest. Immediately she retrieved her hand and headed to the company’s table and told the second-in-command’s wife. She blew it off, saying, “Oh, yeah, he does that.”

On the way home, the young woman told her friends that she was in shock. She hadn’t had a drop to drink and never had any relationship with the man, who was married. Her friends comforted her, but felt helpless because one of them worked for “Handy Man.”

The following Monday the victim had a meeting with the company’s marketing director, telling her that she had to resign due to the episode. The marketing director was sympathetic but could do nothing because she, too, worked for the Handy Man. The young woman called a lawyer friend, telling him what had happened, and that she wanted to put a stop to this man’s abuse before it went any farther with other women. The lawyer bravely took the case on, despite the fact it wasn’t his forte.

Fast-track forward: After the suit was filed, she heard through the grapevine that the mother company had held interviews with management and staffers. Supposedly only one manager had claimed that the young woman was a troublemaker.

A mediation took place one day with the young woman making only four requests:

  • That the man not be in the room during the mediation.
  • That the company would provide a letter saying that her work with the company had been professional.
  • That the man not be fired. She wanted the company to keep an eye on him and prevent him from scourging others.
  • That the remaining months of her contract be fulfilled financially.

The first request was agreed to. He would not be present at any point. What a relief. One down and three to go.

For eight hours, the lawyer and the young woman waited it out in one of the mediator’s office. They talked  about their families. Occasionally, they were brought in to discuss developments with the company’s legal team and the man’s own lawyers, and yet nothing seemed to transpire.

By the end of the day, they were sent home with a wait-and-see comment.

The following Monday, the lawyer called with good news and not-so-good news.

Yes, they would fulfill the contract financially.

Now, for the not-so-good news:

They wouldn’t issue a letter.

But then the real blow hit: The company had cut ties with Handy Man. That one was a knife to the heart. He would inevitably move on to a new company and be allowed to stalk and abuse others.

Shocked, the young woman told her lawyer that the offer wasn’t acceptable. She couldn’t un-fire the man, but she wanted that letter. Her lawyer/friend said it wasn’t going to happen, and that she should accept the offer. She told him that she realized he was working with her on a contingency arrangement and she would compensate him, but, no. She either got the letter, or she would pursue the legal journey. He told her that they wouldn’t budge. She told him that she understood, but she had to proceed. They hung up. 

With that hangup, she felt as if she was in a vacuum. She had done nothing wrong, yet still she felt she was being victimized again. This time it wasn’t a man’s groping hand. It was a company’s denial of a piece of paper validating her.  

What kept her going was defiance. She had lost her demand for the company to keep him from spreading his problem to other unknowing organizations. It was obvious that the powers-that-be wanted to wash their hands of him. But she was not going to allow the company to have their way with her now. Their inquiries and interviews with staff members had already triggered rumors about her own reputation and her own disassociation with the company. She was not going to be victimized again .

Four hours later, she got a call from her lawyer friend. He sounded almost amazed in revealing that the company had agreed to the letter. Would she agree? Hell, yes.

In the days afterward, she received a call from a 20-something woman who had worked for the company. She had been stalked and received voicemails from the man intimidating her. She was grateful that he was out of her life for good.

The perpetrator went on his industry, got an executive job in another part of the country, and stayed married to his wife. The young woman moved on with her life, knowing that she had immediately taken a stand and legally tried to prevent his wanton ways.

So when people like Academy Award winners, political leaders and others write “#Me too,” one can’t help but think, “What did you do about it—and when?”

Just In: CEO Bill Hall Leaving Dallas Area Habitat For Humanity

Bill Hall (File photo)

Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity‘s inaugural Dream Builders Dinner last Thursday was almost as much about Bill Hall, the nonprofit’s longtime CEO, as it was about the featured guest, Deshaun Watson of the Houston Texans.

That’s because, as Hall revealed to the 400 guests at Belo Mansion, he’s leaving the organization. “I’m closing out my time at Habitat,” said Hall, who joined the Dallas area group in 2004.

Later, speakers Daryl Kirkham of presenting sponsor IBERIABANK and Mark Shank, a former board chairman for Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity, spoke of their “gratitude” and admiration for Hall.

Under his leadership, the group has served more than 1,600 families. It’s also become the largest nonprofit homebuilder in Dallas and the largest Habitat chapter in the country.

Hall was a Habitat volunteer before hiring on as a staff member. He holds a bachelor’s degree in building construction from the University of Florida and an MBA from the University of North Carolina.

As the Dream Builders Dinner drew to a close, flutes of champagne were passed around to all the guests. Then Shank led everyone in a “champagne toast” to the group’s departing leader.  

Despite Rain Clouds In The Area, Business Council For The Art’s Obelisk Award Luncheon VIPs Were High And Dry At The Mayfair’s Sky Room

Kevin Hurst and Jeff Byron

High above Turtle Creek in the Mayfair’s Sky Room, the Obelisk Award Luncheon sponsors, honorees, nominators and Business Council for the Arts board members had a spectacular view of the rain clouds creeping into the area as they gathered on the evening of Wednesday, September 27. While the rest of the world slammed on the brakes and waited for the green light, these art-loving types sipped beverages and sampled pass-arounds.

Thanks to Neiman’s Director of Charitable Giving Kevin Hurst, the event was to thank a covey of sponsors, honoree and those who had nominated the candidates like Lee and Sarah Papert, Dotti Reeder, Jennifer and Keith Cerny, Mark Solomon, Lynne and Eddie Reyes, Diana Pollak and Mark Solomon.

Dotti Reeder

Keith and Jennifer Cerny

Looking like he had just returned from a weekend yacht stay in the Mediterranean, Jeff Byron arrived midway into the room. He admitted that since his retirement from NM, he hadn’t worn a tie. In fact, he had discovered that the family Scottish terrier, Hayden, was a snoozer during the day instead of anxiously awaiting his return.

Nasher Sculpture Center Jeremy Strick was smiling over the announcement of the Nasher Prize Laureate the week before at The Warehouse. But he added, “Now the real work is ahead.”

2017 Obelisk Award

As the rain clouds delivered their wet stuff on the glistening streets below, sculptor Jim Bowman‘s newest version of the Obelisk Award was revealed that will be presented to the following:

  • The Arts Partnership Award recognizes businesses that have provided sustained support to an arts/cultural organization for three or more years.
    • Large Business (more than 500 employees locally) — Target
    • Medium Business (between 50 and 500 employees locally) — Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Richardson
    • Small Business (fewer than 50 employees locally) — Angelika Film Center – Dallas
  • The New Initiatives Award recognizes businesses for supporting an innovative arts/cultural program created within the past three years.
    • Large Business (more than 500 employees locally) — Corgan
    • Medium Business (between 50-500 employees locally) — West Village
    • Small Business (fewer than 50 employees locally) — C.C. Communications, LLC
  • The Distinguished Cultural Organization Award is given to recognize one outstanding nonprofit organization for a project or program that has enhanced the community through partnership with a business. — The Cliburn
  • The Business Champion for the Arts Award recognizes long-term leadership and commitment to arts/culture by a business executive (president, CEO, partner). — Nancy Carlson
  • The Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader Award recognizes an arts leader who has consistently demonstrated vision, impact, innovation, and successful alignment with business and community partners throughout their tenure. — Keith Cerny nominated by Deutsche Bank Trust Co., NA/ Deutsche Bank Wealth Management.
  • The Arts Education Award recognizes one outstanding business for its support of arts education programs. — Neiman Marcus Group
  • The Lifetime Achievement Award recognizing lifetime advancement of the arts. — Ask Me About Art/Gail Sachson
  • The Community Champion Award recognizing community arts advancement — Kathy Litinas.

Katherine Wagner

Steve Roth

Minutes after BCA Founder’s Chair Nancy Nasher arrived, Business Council for the Arts CEO Katherine Wagner and Obelisk Luncheon Co-Chair Steve Roth announced that plans were heading forward for the fundraising event at the Belo with Dallas Symphony Orchestra principle trumpet Ryan Anthony.

Niki and Ryan Anthony

Nancy Nasher and Gail Sachson

Looking at the crowd of art lovers and supporters, Nancy, who admits to being basically shy, said with a smile that she felt right at home. After all, these were people like Gail Sachson, and they were like family.

Award-Winning Filmmaker Johnathan Brownlee To Head Up Dallas Film Society And Dallas International Film Festival

Johnathan Brownlee*

The Dallas Film Society and its Dallas International Film Festival have new leadership. Award-winning Canadian/American entertain veteran Johnathan Brownlee has been selected to serve as the Dallas Film Society’s CEO/President and the DIFF’s Executive Director.

According to DFS Chair Mark Denesuk, “The board had a tall order for its new leader – expand our community impact and energize our development efforts, all while managing the city’s largest film festival. After a long process, Johnathan emerged as the clear choice and we are delighted that he is now leading the organization during this exciting new chapter of growth.”

Johnathan’s involvement in the film and television industry ranges from feature films to conducting workshops at Harvard, MIT, etc.

Johnathan replaces Lee Papert, who left the organization this summer.

* Photo courtesy of Dallas Film Society

For the full-blown press release, follow the jump: [Read more…]

Self-Made Millionaire/”Shark Tank”‘s Barbara Corcoran To Be Guest Speaker For The Legacy Senior Communities Yes! Event In November

Barbara Corcoran*

Barbara Corcoran is a very busy, busy gal nowadays. Well, she always has been with all her real estate deals that transformed her from waitress to “self-made millionaire.” Then there’s a little TV show, called “Shark Tank,” where she has held her own with the likes of Mark Cuban, Robert Herjavec, Kevin O’Leary and Daymond John

She’s had so many balls to juggle, it’s no wonder that the 68-year-old’s gig on “Dancing With The Stars” was just one too many, resulting in her being eliminated this past week. However, she proved her spunk and class by accepting her elimination with humor.

But leave it to the The Legacy Senior Communities Yes! Event to snag her as the guest speaker for the annual fundraising luncheon at the Meyerson on Thursday, November 2. But then what else would you expect from a committee including Carol Aaron, Dawn Aaron, Sandy Donsky, Linda Garner, Zona Pidgeon, Jody Stein and Karla Steinberg?

The plan calls for her to “share her personal story, as well as insight into what motivates her today.”

Benefiting The Legacy Senior Communities Financial Assistance Fund, the event will provide support for The Legacy Midtown Park’s rental continuing care retirement community currently under development in Dallas, to help supplement the cost of their care and provide the extra amenities that enrich the quality of their life.”

According to Carol, “A community is judged by the way it cares for its elders, and I feel it is our collective responsibility to provide a wonderful lifestyle and exemplary care to seniors in Greater Dallas. We encourage everyone to step up and help us continue to not just meet but exceed the needs of seniors and their families now and in the future.”

In addition to Barbara, The Carmen Miller Michael – Legacy Senior Communities Award will be presented to “pay tribute to a member of the Greater Dallas community who displays the special qualities which Carmen Miller Michael possessed: a pioneering spirit and an unshakeable sense of justice and compassion.”

The Legacy Senior Community Board of Trustees Chair Marc R. Stanley said, “We will honor a truly inspirational individual and trailblazer who shares our commitment to serving others, and we will hear from a motivational entrepreneur during this captivating event. We are thankful to all of our donors whose support assists us in providing thriving communities and high-quality care. We find it truly rewarding to provide seniors with dynamic and enriched lives.”

Single tickets are $200 with various levels of sponsorship available.

* Photo credit: ABC/Patrick Ecclesine

Former Barrister Nick Even Named WaterTower Theatre’s General Manager

Change takes place quickly. No sooner had WaterTower Theatre’s General Manager Greg Patterson announced his departure than the board announced his replacement. It will be blonde, legal eagle Nick Even, who proclaimed his love of the arts when he resigned from the law profession to pursue his arts passion after 30 years.

Nick Even (File photo)

According to Nick, “I am thrilled to share that as of October 1, 2017, I will begin serving as Managing Director of WaterTower Theatre. For my friends outside the Metroplex, WTT is a leading professional theatre company here in North Texas and – as fate would have it – served as my entry into arts non-profit boards after moving from New York. Eventually, I served as Board President in 2008. The theater has developed substantially since then, both financially and artistically, and I could not be more excited to help lead it in its next era of growth.

“I will be joining WTT’s recently named Artistic Director Joanie Schultz. Joanie came to WTT at the first of the year from Chicago, where she was Associate Artistic Producer at Victory Gardens Theater and a freelance director at both the Goodman and Steppenwolf, among numerous other theaters. Joanie has already been cited for Outstanding Direction by the Dallas-Fort Worth Theater Critics Forum for her WTT directorial debut: ‘Hit the Wall.’

“WTT’s new season will open officially on Monday, October 16 with the regional premiere of ‘Pride and Prejudice,’ adapted from the Jane Austen novel by Kate Hamill, so I will be wasting no time in getting up to speed. 

“Other season programming includes The Great Distance Home (world premiere) by Kelsey Leigh Ervi; Elliot, a Soldier’s Fugue (regional premiere) by Quiara Alegría Hudes; Bread (world premiere) by Regina Taylor; Jason Robert Brown‘s musical “The Last Five Years; and Hand to God” (regional premiere) by Robert Askins. The season will also include “Detour,” a four-day festival of new work in March 2018. It’s a diverse and exciting season, to be sure. If you’d like to read more, you can visit: https://watertowertheatre.org/coming-soon.”

Sounds like Nick is already settling into his new role as things are shaking up north of LBJ.

JUST IN: 2017 Obelisk Award Recipients And Keynote Speaker Announced For Business Council For The Arts Fundraising Luncheon

Steven Roth and Thai-Ian Tran*

Obelisk Award Luncheon Co-Chairs Thai-Ian Tran and Steve Roth have just announced the luncheon keynote speaker and the recipients of the 2017 Obelisk Awards that is annually presented by Business Council For The Arts.

Addressing the group of art lovers will be Nasher Haemisegger Fellow for the National Center for Arts Research and former Brooklyn Academy of Music President Karen Brooks Hopkins.

As for the Obelisk Awardees, this year’s collection of outstanding art supporters are:  

  • The Arts Partnership Award recognizes businesses that have provided sustained support to an arts/cultural organization for three or more years.
    • Large Business (more than 500 employees locally) — Target nominated by Nasher Sculpture Center.
    • Medium Business (between 50 and 500 employees locally) — Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Richardson nominated by AIR (Arts Incubator of Richardson).
    • Small Business (fewer than 50 employees locally) — Angelika Film Center – Dallas nominated by Video Association of Dallas
  • The New Initiatives Award recognizes businesses for supporting an innovative arts/cultural program created within the past three years.
    • Large Business (more than 500 employees locally) — Corgan nominated by Creative Arts Center
    • Medium Business (between 50-500 employees locally) — West Village nominated by: Dallas Film Society
    • Small Business (fewer than 50 employees locally) — C.C. Communications, LLC nominated by Esta Raza No Se Raja

Nancy Carlson (File photo)

Keith Cerny (File photo)

  • The Distinguished Cultural Organization Award is given to recognize one outstanding nonprofit organization for a project or program that has enhanced the community through partnership with a business. — The Cliburn nominated by The Arts Council of Fort Worth/Neiman Marcus
  • The Business Champion for the Arts Award recognizes long-term leadership and commitment to arts/culture by a business executive (president, CEO, partner). — Nancy Carlson nominated by TACA
  • The Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader Award recognizes an arts leader who has consistently demonstrated vision, impact, innovation, and successful alignment with business and community partners throughout their tenure. — Keith Cerny nominated by Deutsche Bank Trust Co., NA/ Deutsche Bank Wealth Management.
  • The Arts Education Award recognizes one outstanding business for its support of arts education programs. — Neiman Marcus Group nominated by Big Thought and Dallas Black Dance Theater
  • The Lifetime Achievement Award recognizing lifetime advancement of the arts. — Ask Me About Art/Gail Sachson nominated by Carolyn Brown Photography
  • The Community Champion Award recognizing community arts advancement — Kathy Litinas nominated by Allen Arts Alliance

According to Business Council For The Arts CEO Katherine Wagner, “This year’s Obelisk honorees reflect the significant growth of the arts regionally – a fact underscored in our recent economic impact study, showing that the nonprofit arts and culture sector has now reached an impact of $1.5 billion annually in North Texas.”

Katherine Wagner (File photo)

Mary Anne Alhadeff (File photo)

Ryan Anthony (File photo)

The awards will be presented on Wednesday, November 15, at Belo Mansion with returnees KERA President/CEO Mary Anne Alhadeff as emcee and Dallas Symphony Orchestra Principal Trumpet Ryan Anthony onstage.

Tickets start at $150 and are available here!

* Photo provided by Business Council For The Arts

Crayton Webb Heads Into “Sunwest” Thanks To A “Stern” Buyout

Folks have been wondering whatever happened to fundraising Crayton Webb, since his departure last month from Mary Kay Inc. Had he left his wife, Nikki Webb, and their four kids to join the Foreign Legion? Had he been whisked away by space aliens? Had he become a recluse living in The Joule?

Crayton Webb (File photo)

Andy Stern (File photo)

None of the above. He was in the final negotiations to “buy” Andy Stern’s 35-year-old Sunwest Communications. And now the deal is done.

Crayton admitted that the timing was perfect for him and he was flattered that Andy would entrust him with his company.

Crayton reported, “Thanks to Andy Stern, Sunwest Communications is highly respected in the reputation business, boasting an impressive list of clients and an amazing team of public relations professionals. I look forward to the privilege of building upon 35 years of outstanding public relations counsel, communications and senior-level service by standing on the shoulders of a giant in the industry like Andy.”

As for Andy, he’s really not going anywhere. He’s just moving down the hallway. As Senior Counsel, he’ll still be a part of the public relations firm whose clients include Exxon Mobil, CBRE, the Catholic Foundation, Rosewood Property Company, KDC, Victory Park and XTO.

The reason for Andy’s “selling” the firm was not a spur of the moment decision. He applied the same strategy to his plan that he has for his clients. Looking at the future of his staff and company, he didn’t want to sell to a mega public relations operation. But he did want Sunwest to move ahead providing strategic communication services. In considering in whom to entrust Sunwest, he recognized that he and Crayton shared common values, both personally and professionally.

According to Andy, “After 35 years, I had to be sure Sunwest Communications was left in the good, capable hands of an expert communicator and leader. Sunwest is a family business and that feeling of family extends to our team and clients. I’m confident in Crayton’s ingenuity and leadership to take Sunwest Communications to elevated levels of success, as well as his integrity and wisdom to carry on the company culture that has defined us.” 

Both men have worked in the political sector (Andy as Staff Assistant to President Gerald Ford and Crayton as chief of staff for Dallas Mayor Laura Miller) and in the media (Andy as a print reporter and Crayton at KTVT), and both have heavy ties and leadership positions in various community and nonprofit organizations.

Andy has held leadership roles in AMN Healthcare Services, Medical City Dallas Hospital, the Texas Healthcare Trustees, the American Hospital Association’s Committee on Governance, the Dallas Citizens Council, the Salesmanship Club of Dallas, Dallas Assembly, Leadership Dallas Alumni, Public Relations Society of America, Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center, the Sixth Floor Museum, North Dallas Chamber and Salesmanship Club Charitable Golf. 

On the other hand, Crayton has been involved with the National Domestic Violence Hotline, the Arbor Day Foundation, YMCA of Metropolitan Dallas, the Dallas Regional Chamber, SMU, the Junior League of Dallas, Leadership Dallas and Genesis Women’s Shelter’s HeROs.

When asked if Crayton’s new responsibilities as a CEO would curtail his involvement in the nonprofit sector, he was surprised that the question was even aired. With his young family and his new staff, he is even more dedicated to supporting the programs and organizations that build the North Texas community.

Greg Patterson Takes A Final Bow As WaterTower Theatre Managing Director This Month

Change continues at WaterTower Theatre. It was just a year ago that the Addison-based Theatre’s Artistic Director Terry Martin left and a search commenced for a replacement. That search resulted in bringing on board Joanie Schultz, who made headlines with her first local production — “Hit The Wall.”

Greg Patterson and Joanie Schultz (File photo)

Now word arrives that Managing Director Greg Patterson will be leaving the company at the end of the month, when his contract ends.

According to Greg, “I’ve so enjoyed my nearly 10 years here at WaterTower Theatre. My tenure at WaterTower Theatre has been the happiest time for me professionally. Over a year ago, when WTT was embarking on the search for a new Artistic Director, I committed myself to ensuring the transition from Terry Martin to Joanie Schultz would be as smooth and easy as possible, and to play a role in setting the Company on the right path going forward. I always knew that after that transition was completed, it would be time for me to look for new and exciting life adventures, and that time is now. I love WaterTower Theatre and all the donors, board, and staff who have made this Company so successful during my 9+ years of service. WTT has an exciting, bright future with Joanie at the helm and I couldn’t feel more pride and confidence in this great Company than I do at this point.”

In the meantime, “WaterTower Theatre’s Board of Directors has established a transition team comprised of the Executive Committee and Artistic Director Joanie Schultz to manage the theater’s operations until a new Managing Director is named.”

Neiman’s Malcolm Reuben’s Retirement To California Will Result In Losing Energizer Bunny Rabbit Volunteer Vinnie Reuben

Dallas Morning News’ Maria Halkias reported that Neiman Marcus NorthPark GM/VP Malcolm Reuben announced that he’ll be retiring at the end of the year and heading to California to be closer to the grandkids.

Vinnie and Malcolm Reuben (File photo)

Surprised? No. It’s been in the works for a while. The loss? A double knockout. Besides the loss of a stellar retail executive, North Texas will be losing Malcolm’s fundraising wife, Vinnie Reuben.

No, she hasn’t chaired one of the hoop-la events. Rather, Vinnie has earned the reputation of being the behind-the-scenes “Energizer Bunny Rabbit.” She has taken on the art of handling reservations like Jaap van Zweden’s conducting an orchestra.

North Texas’ reputation for philanthropy has been built on the hard work and juggling of arrangements by people like Vinnie. California’s gain will be North Texas’ loss. The non-profits were lucky to have her as along at they did. Now, Vinnie’s and Malcolm’s grandkids will be the beneficiaries of her presence.

‘Draft Day’ Celebrates Cristo Rey-North Texas Business Work Study Partnership

Bishop Edward J. Burns of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dallas gave the invocation. Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings served as emcee for a while. Mike’s son, Gunnar Rawlings, executive director of the Cristo Rey Corporate Work Study Program, also helped out. Sports personality Michael “Grubes” Gruber and Erin Hartigan, Fox Sports Southwest host, provided commentary. Even Rachel Lindsay, star of TV’s “The Bachelorette” series, put in an appearance.

Kelby Woodard, Rachel Lindsay, Edward Burns and Mike Rawlings*

The occasion: Cristo Rey Dallas College Prep‘s third annual, NFL-style “Draft Day,” presented by Frost Bank. The event, attended by more than 500 guests, was held at the school on July 28 to match the school’s 148 incoming freshmen and sophomores with their corporate work assignments for the 2017-2018 school year. The students earn more than 60% of their tuition by working one day each week at such iconic North Texas companies as Mary Kay, AT&T, Hunt Oil, Deloitte and Jackson Walker.

Mike “Grubes” Gruber, Erin Hartigan, Mike Rawlings and Gunnar Rawlings*

CEOs or senior leaders from these and more than 100 other companies turned up for the event at Cristo Rey, which is one of 32 Catholic prep schools in the Cristo Rey network. Under the work study program, the school’s economically challenged students receive work experience as well as leadership training.

David Leach and Melanie Duarte*

Noah Barron, Scott Moore and Daisy Garcia*

With top business luminaries in the audience including Greyhound CEO David Leach, PWC Managing Partners Scott Moore and CBRE Vice Chair Jack Fraker, the students were called to the stage one by one to meet their new employers. As they did so they exchanged high-fives and hugs and checked out a variety of “swag” items from their new companies, including logo t-shirts and ball caps.

“This year we are welcoming more than 35 new partners to the Corporate Work Study Program, with job teams now working in Downtown, Uptown, Richardson, North Dallas and beyond,” said Kelby Woodard, Cristo Rey Dallas’s president. “In addition to contributing more than $3 million toward the cost of tuition, the Corporate Work Study Program provides students with hands-on work experience in a real-world setting and a chance to develop leadership skills that will last a lifetime.”

BlueCross Blue Shield of Texas at Cristo Rey Draft Day*

Other companies participating in the school’s Draft Day program included HKS, BlueCross BlueShield of Texas and Tenet Healthcare.

* Photo credit: Tamytha Cameron Smith

Americans For The Arts Study Provides Numbers And Facts About North Texas Arts Community’s Economic Impact Using The B-Word

There are those who scoff at the economic muscle of the nonprofit sector. Perhaps it is because they think back to their days when they equated nonprofits with saving pennies for Savings Bonds. However, the nonprofit organizations have become powerhouses of businesses that translate into more than supporting and growing communities. They also provide big bucks across the board.

On Wednesday, June 28, at the Dallas City Performance Hall, the Business Council for the Arts, the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs and the Dallas Arts District provided numbers and facts that the arts of North Texas alone “generated $1,473,366,015 in annual economic activity.” Check that number again. In addition to the dollars, it also supported 52,848 full-time equivalent jobs and generated $167.2M in local and state government revenues.

The trio didn’t just pull those numbers of their proverbial hats. An “exhaustive national economic impact study, Arts and Economic Prosperity 5,” was conducted by the Americans for the Arts with the Business Council for the Arts gathering the research in this region. The study is conducted to “examine cities, counties and states nationwide every five years. This year, for a regional perspective, six North Texas cities and cultural districts participated with Business Council for the Arts, demonstrating the reach and impact of arts and culture in neighborhoods and communities across the region.”

Katherine Wagner (File photo)

According to Business Council for the Arts CEO Katherine Wagner, “This study shows, in power numbers, just what a critical role arts and culture also play in keeping our national, state and local economies vibrant and growing. Reflecting our population and business growth, our region is now the third largest arts economy in the nation.”

Highlights from the study included the following:

North Texas Highlights

  • The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA came in third, measured against other multi-county regions in the country.
  • The economic impact of arts and culture organizations in North Texas more than tripled between the previously published study in 2012 and the current study – from $428,512,328 to $1,473,366,015.
  • In the region, the nonprofit arts and culture sector equated to 52,848 FTE jobs supported, translating into $1.3 billion in annual salaries.
  • North Texas cultural audience attendance numbers totaled 13,970,000 in 2015, contributing $473,856,433 to the economy.

City of Dallas Highlights

The study found that the City of Dallas, which also participated in the 2010 study, is seeing robust returns from its annual and long-term investment in the arts, including triple-digit growth in economic impact, jobs and audiences, as well as generating even more revenue for state and local government. In FY 2015:

  • Total economic activity tied to Dallas arts and culture was $891 million, up from the $321 million in the 2010 study – a 2.8-fold increase.
  • Dallas arts organizations and audiences supported 33,554 jobs, a nearly 3-fold increase over data collected in 2010.
  • Dallas arts and culture generated revenue of $97 million to local and state governments.

Dallas Arts District Highlights

  • The economic activity of the Dallas Arts District alone has tripled in five years, going from $128.6 million to $395.8 million.
  • The revenue generated for local government from Dallas Arts District arts organizations and audiences was $19 million in 2015.
  • 14,932 jobs are supported by Dallas Arts District arts organizations and audiences.

According to Americans for the Arts President/CEO Robert L. Lynch, “This study demonstrates that the arts are an economic and employment powerhouse both locally and across the nation. A vibrant arts and culture industry helps local businesses thrive and helps local communities become stronger and healthier places to live. Leaders who care about community and economic vitality can feel good about choosing to invest in the arts. Nationally as well as locally, the arts mean business.”

While these numbers and results are staggering, they are also just a snapshot of one sector within the incredible North Texas nonprofit world.

 

MySweetCharity Opportunity: 2017 Obelisk Awards Luncheon

Steven Roth and Thai-Ian Tran*

According to Parkland Health and Hospital System Senior Deputy General Counsel and 2017 Obelisk Awards Luncheon Co-Chairs Steven Roth and Thai-Ian Tran,

I hope the Dallas community will make plans to join the Business Council for the Arts and us for the 29th Annual Obelisk Awards on Wednesday, November 15, at the Belo Mansion.  

The Obelisk Awards recognizes companies and leaders in business and the arts for their invaluable contributions supporting arts and culture in North Texas. We know this year’s recipients will be no exception and we look forward to announcing them soon.

Ryan Anthony (File photo)

The Obelisk Awards luncheon will include a reception, seated lunch and recognition of the 2017 award recipients. The keynote speaker for the event is Karen Brooks Hopkins, who currently serves as the Nasher Haemisegger Fellow for the National Center for Arts Research. She is the former president of the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Returning as Master of Ceremonies is North Texas Public Broadcasting President/CEO Mary Anne Alhadeff, which includes KERA Radio and Television, as well as KXT and affiliated programs. Returning to the Obelisk stage will be last year’s speaker Ryan Anthony, principal trumpet of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra/founder of The Ryan Anthony Foundation.

Individual tickets are $150 each; sponsorships begin at $750.  For more information about the Obelisk Awards, visit http://ntbca.org/obelisk or contact Catherine Thompson, 972.991.8300, Ext. 601.

Business Council for the Arts (BCA) is a nonprofit organization founded in 1988 as connector and convenor between businesses, municipalities, and arts and cultural organizations. For 29 years, Business Council for the Arts has advocated for business support of the arts, developed business leaders for nonprofit boards of directors; fostered employee creativity, engagement and creativity through the arts; guided strategic business support for the arts; and measured the economic impact of arts and culture in North Texas.

* Photo provided by Business Council for the Arts

 

JUST IN: Crayton Webb Reveals His Last Day As Mary Kay Inc. VP, But Remains Tight-Lipped About Future Plans

Nikki and Crayton Webb (File photo)

In the North Texas nonprofit world, Mary Kay Inc. VP of Corporate Communications and Corporate Social Responsibility Crayton Webb has established quite a stellar reputation as a major champion in the war against domestic violence. Besides chairing HeROs, Genesis Women’s Shelter‘s men’s auxiliary, and co-chairing the recent Genesis Luncheon with wife Nikki Webb, he has served on the board of the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

An example of his blending his professional life with his personal advocacy has been his being front and center for the annual “Suits for Shelters” program, providing clothes for area domestic violence shelters.

What some folks don’t realize is that his involvement and leadership have not been limited to Mary Kay Inc. and domestic violence. Need proof? Since landing in North Texas in 1998, he has been part of a vast variety of organizations and programs, including the YMCA of Metropolitan Dallas Board, the Communications Council for the Dallas Regional Chamber, the Executive Forum of the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship, Communications Studies at SMU, the Junior League of Dallas, Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity, Leadership Dallas Alumni Association and Dallas Convention and Visitors Bureau to name a few.

Prior to joining Mary Kay Inc., he was an award-winning reporter for KTVT-TV (CBS) from 1998 to 2001, as well as chief of staff for former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller from 2002 to 2005.

In the past 19 years, he has received the 2015 Leadership Dallas Distinguished Alumni Award, was named to the Dallas Business Journal‘s class of “40 under Forty,” was named one of the “Five Outstanding Young Dallasites” by the Dallas Junior Chamber of Commerce and one of the “Five Outstanding Young Texans” by the Texas Junior Chamber of Commerce.

It was just learned that Crayton announced that he has given his notice to Mary Kay. Ironically, his final day with the Dallas-based mega-company will be on the 54th anniversary of the founding of Mary Kay Inc. — Wednesday, September 13.

What’s in his future? Crayton is tight-lipped on that question. However, the answer will be revealed in September. But never fear. He and Nikki are still staying true to North Texas and its nonprofit world.

Stay tuned.

Girl Scouts Of Northeast Texas Celebrates National S’mores Day With News Of Last Year’s Winning Cookie Return And Online Purchasing

The Girl Scouts scored a new big hit last year, and they ain’t gonna let it be a one-time wonder. It was the debut of Girl Scout S’mores Cookie. Not only was it a hit, but it was “the most popular flavor to launch in the 100 years of Girl Scouts selling cookies.”  

And the Girl Scouts are smart cookies themselves, so  they’ve taken advantage of today being National S’mores Day with news — the S’mores Cookie will return to the cookie lineup in 2018.

Girl Scouts S’mores*

Jennifer Bartkowski (File photo)

According to Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas CEO Jennifer Bartkowski, “We are excited for the return of Girl Scout S’mores, which our girls and hungry customers alike have loved! S’mores have strong ties to our organization’s history, and this cookie brings a new delicious way for consumers to support girls and the experiences that help them develop leadership skills through Girl Scouts.”

To celebrate the day and the return of the marshmallow, chocolate and cracker cookie, GSNT will host 100 Girl Scouts at its STEM Center of Excellence today from 10 a.m. to noon “to make traditional campfire s’mores, creates s’more GORP, invent a s’mores recipe and more” s’mores stuff.

There is just the slightest hiccup in the news. The S’mores are going to be a tad bit more expensive than some of the other Girl Scout cookies. The reason? In addition to being embossed with the Girl Scout’s Outdoor badge, it “contains no artificial flavors or colors, high-fructose corn syrup, or hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, making it the first cookie of its kind at Girl Scouts.” Oh, how much more? Relax. It will just be a dollar more, making the price $5 a box.

Old-fashion S’mores*

Girl Scouts S’mores and Somoas*

It will be interesting to see the Samoas fans ramp up their purchases to top S’mores.  Maybe the two cookies could get together for a “S’moroas”?

Funds netted from the GSNT 2018 cookie program that runs from Friday, January 12, thru Sunday, February 25, will stay put in North Texas.

Girl Scout at computer*

Another new development for the GSNT cookie program will be the availability of the cookies. In addition to personalized customer service from every Girl Scout in the neighborhood, all the cookies (Thin Mints, Samoas, Tagalongs, Trefoils, Do-si-dos, Savannah Smiles, Toffee-tastics and Girl Scout S’mores) will be on sale at the online portal Digital Cookie that will be up during the cookie sale-athon. That means you can stay in your jammies while ordering a couple of crates of cookies. Stock up because as you have learned from years past, they seem to be gobbled up within weeks.

BTW, the GSNT have provided some “fun facts” about their cookie program:

  • In 2017, our girls donated over 90,000 packages of cookies to military troops
  • In the past five years… our girls have sold nearly 16 million packages of Girl Scout cookies
  • In 2017, the average troop profit in Northeast Texas was almost $1,200
  • In 2017, over 140,000 boxes of S’mores were sold throughout Northeast Texas

Girl Scouts around the campfire*

P.S. — The GSNT provided loads of photos for the announcement. However, most of the girls were bundled up in down vests, knitted scarves and sock caps. Evidently, they weren’t photographed in Texas recently.

* Photo provided by Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas