Dallas Historical Society “Celebrate(s) Texas” With George Tobolowsky’s Collection Of Historic Texas Maps As The Centerpiece

Most folks know George Tobolowsky for his sculptures. But it was his wife Julie Tobolowsky’s complaining about his watching “The Simpsons” about 20 years ago that added an entirely different interest in his life — historic maps.

So the story goes that Julie suggested that reading a book would be better than boob-tube watching. The first book that George picked up was “Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 1513-1900.” Not only was Julie right on, she set her husband into collecting every map that was in that book and a lot more.

Historic maps display

Since artist George recognized the detail and beauty in the maps, he had them framed and displayed on the walls of the Tobolowsky home. Some were even framed in wood made from trees that George had felled.

Knowing this, the Dallas Historical Society held a “Celebrate Texas” party on the evening of Wednesday, March 1, the day before Texas Independence Day.

Alan Olson, Molly Nolan and Julie and George Tobolowsky

While DHS Executive Director Amy Aldredge was unable to attend, DHS Deputy Director  Alan Olson and DHS Development Associate Molly Nolan represented the DHS staff.

Sold-Out Alert!: 2017 Art In Bloom

Whoops! Yesterday it was reported that no “Sold Outs” had been announced for the spring fundraising season following spring break. Today word arrived that that status had changed.

2017 Art In Bloom’s “Seasons Of Love”*

Not only is the 2017 Art In Bloom’s “Seasons Of Love” hosted by the Dallas Museum of Art League and chaired by Sarah Jo Hardin sold out, but organizers have added an opportunity for those who missed out on the Monday, March 27th event.

Sure, the Art In Bloom guests will get a sneak peak of the “Live Blooming Art Exhibit,” but DMA visitors will be able to check the floral designs “created by local floral designers and inspired by works of art from the Museum’s permanent collection” from Tuesday, March 28, thru Wednesday, March 29, on the DMA’s Level Two.

And how about some name dropping? Well, Art In Bloom can provide ‘em. The exhibition will include the talents of Judy Blackman of Blumengarten, Metka Terselich of Metka Floral Designs, Caroline Hansen of Forestwood Florals, Dan Pierce of Wild about Flowers, Doan Do of Cebolla Fine Flowers, Sarah Hobbs of Park Cities Petals, Juan Gomar of Apples to Zinnias, Lucy Diaz-Flores of Bella Flora and David Kimmel of David Kimmel Design.

So, don’t boo-hoo that you can’t attend the presentation by floral industry ambassador René van Rems and lunch on Monday at the DMA. You can still check out “Live Blooming Art Exhibit” Tuesday and Wednesday!

Art In Bloom proceeds will benefit the DMA League’s Floral Endowment Fund, as well as the DMA’s exhibition and education programs.

* Graphic courtesy of Dallas Museum of Art League

Northwood Woman’s Club’s “Dine By Design” Luncheon Whooped It Up With More Than 30 Tables All Duded Up Texas-Style

Gaylan Sapp and Shannon Burton

Unlike lady year’s Parisian ooh-la-la theme with a standard poodle greeting guests at the door, the North Woman’s Club’s Dine by Design was Texas-bound on Tuesday, February 28 at Bent Tree Country Club. Luncheon Co-Chairs Gaylan Sapp and Shannon Burton had decided to use “Waltz Across Texas” as the inspiration for more than 30 table designs. Well, why not? Texas Independence Day was just 48 hours away.

And to get things going, they had cowgirls Hailey Sandoz and Kristyn Harris strumming and singing in the entry.

Hailey Sandoz and Kristyn Harris

According to Gaylan, she came up with the Texas idea and her husband thought up the theme.

For the past year, Rebecca Dickinson and Sherry Draper had spearheaded the gathering of professional designers and creative types to fill the club. And the tables reflected just how different each creator’s interpretation was. Sure, there were Holiday Warehouse’s “Spring Waltz” and Donna Bailey‘s “Here Comes Easter To Texas” that cashed in on the upcoming spring and Easter.

Here Comes Easter To Texas

Spring Waltz

And Susan Loveless managed to blend her new line of Spa 1421 at her table with the approval of her mother Betty Stripling.

Poker and Gun Barrel City

Deep in the Heart

This Ain’t My First Rodeo

Trains Across Texas

Still others embraced the Lone Star feel with everything from Paula Austell‘s and Sarah Losinger‘s “Trains Across Texas,” Peggy Shuman‘s “Poker At Gun Barrel City,” Barbara Kutz‘s “This Ain’t My First Rodeo,” Barbara Barndt‘s, Michelle Hefner‘s and Molly Meyer‘s “Deep In The Heart,” Laura Williamson‘s and Lugay Wills‘ “All My Exes Live In Texas” to Carolyn Tayne‘s and Betty Verplan‘s “Daughters of the Republic of Texas…125 Years of Preserving Texas History.”

Mary Anne Preston’s copy of the Texas Declaration of Independence

And speaking of Texas history, new club member Mary Anne Preston, who was the great-great-granddaughter of Texas legend Jesse Grimes, shared family memorabilia including a copy of the original handwritten Texas Declaration of Independence.

After checking out all the tables and enjoying flutes of champagne, the guests headed to the ballroom for lunch and entertainment by Dan Tanner.

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, let the photos of the tables tell how the Northwood Woman’s Club raises funds for Friends of Wednesday’s Child, Genesis Women’s Shelter And Support, North Dallas Shared Ministries, Our Friends Place, Promise House and Shared Housing Center Inc. Check the designs at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Northwood Woman’s Club’s Dine By Design

Those Northwood Woman’s Club gals once again filled Bent Tree Country Club with dozens and dozens of decked-out table settings for its annual Dine By Design on Tuesday, February 28. This year’s theme of “Waltz Across Texas” was true food for thought with tables ranging from spring whimsical to another just chugging along.

Spring Waltz

Trains Across Texas

While the post is being prepared, check out the tables at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Dallas Museum Of Art Became A 21st Century “Shaken, Style, Stirred” Speakeasy For 1,200 Femme Fatale Flappers And Dapper Dandies

The Dallas Museum of Art‘s current exhibition “Shaken, Styled, Stirred: The Art Of The Cocktail” provided the inspiration for more than a thousand guests to turn back the clocks on Saturday, February 4, to the Prohibition era. That’s when the right password provided access to the hottest speakeasy in town with music, dancing and naughty adult libations. Luckily, Prohibition is long gone, but the Hamon Atrium was as hot as a jazz baby. Here’s a report from the field:

The Dallas Museum of Art was transformed into a Prohibition-style speakeasy on Saturday, February 4, in celebration of the exhibition “Shaken, Styled, Stirred: The Art of the Cocktail,” an exhibition of cocktail ware from the late 19th century through present day.

Speakeasy in the Hamon Atrium*

Over 1,200 guys and dolls like Gwen and Eddie Lee, Melanie Cooke, Allie and Michael Gillam, Stephanie Gregory, Danielle Wessman, Angela and Kevin Jackson, Maria and Richard Von Horvath, Monica Berry, Sarah Stockton, Holly Bosler, Molly Meyer, Gary Beach, Cassandra Davis, Caitlin and Akers Moore, Jessica and Harl Asaff, Alia Reiners, Linda Snorina, Jack Tosi and Maggie Luttrell arrived in their best roaring-20’s attire and entered through the Museum’s Hamon Atrium. The 18-piece band, the Singapore Slingers, provided the big-band sound as guests enjoyed gaming tables, “French 75” specialty cocktails with ROXOR gin, and a buffet featuring sliders, a fries station with choice of sweet potato fries, regular fries or tater tots served in cones with custom toppings, mini carrot cake and cheesecake bites, and strawberry mousse cups.

Akers and Caitlin Moore and Jessica and Harl Asaff*

Molly Meyer*

Alia Reniers and Linda Snorina*

Gwen and Eddie Lee and Melanie Cooke*

Attendees posed in the nearby photo booth or in in front of the mint-condition period cars from the Dallas Model A Ford Club, posting their mugs on social media with the dedicated #dmaspeakeasy. For those hitting the dance floor, The Rhythm Room instructors provided the steps to 20’s favorites, including the Fox Trot and Charleston.

For VIP’s, the Focus One Gallery provided the perfect Hideaway with DJ Souljah spinning jazz-age hits with a twist, a ROXOR Gin Garden, private gaming tables and dedicated dance instructors. The savory and sweet cocktail buffet featured house-cured Gravlax crostini, dill and mustard dressing, caprese stacks with balsamic and basil, beef and horseradish rolls, home smoked chicken and mango tortilla cups, chocolate mousse shooters, lemon curd tartlets and pineapple upside down cake bites.

Jane Aldridge*

Stephanie and Phillip Robinson*

Mid-way through the evening all the Gatsbys and molls gathered at the main stage for the announcement of the winners of the costume contest. Contest judge and celebrity blogger Jane Aldridge of the Sea of Shoes blog awarded “Best Flapper” to Stephanie Surratt, “Best Dapper Dan” to Bennett Allen and “Best Couple” to Stephanie and Phillip Robinson.

Stephanie Surratt*

Bennett and Katie Allen*

As the fun continued, attendees enjoyed the exhibition that inspired the celebration, “Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail.” Featuring nearly sixty works, predominantly from the DMA’s extensive design holdings, the exhibition explores the culture of cocktails and the wares in which they are prepared and served. As well it follows the development of the modern cocktail from the late 19th century to the present day, tracing the stylistic reflections of the rituals of the cocktail’s preparation, presentation, and consumption. “Shaken, Stirred, Styled” features a range of objects, many of which are on view for the first time, including 19th-century punch bowls, Prohibition-era cocktail shakers, and Art Deco and modern barware.

Before the night came to an end, partygoers gathered once more for the announcement of the winners of five fabulous raffle prizes:

  • The Joule Hotel and Midnight Rambler Package: a one night get away in deluxe accommodations at The Joule Hotel with complimentary overnight valet parking and a $100-gift card for food and beverage at the premier craft cocktail bar, the Midnight Rambler.
  • Fossil® Q Wander rose gold stainless+Q Marshal in brown leather
  • Victor Tangos and Bella and Chloe: a $150 shopping spree at Bella & Chloe/Brethren Boutique and a $100 gift certificate to Victor Tangos, home to Rising Star Chef of the Year, Chef Kirstyn Brewer!
  • Ultra-Luxe ROXOR Gin Experience: six tickets to a private curator tour through the Shaken, Stirred, Styled  Then, enjoy an exclusive ROXOR cocktail-making class, perched 19 floors above Klyde Warren Park and the DMA, in a private residence.
  • Arts & Letters Live VIP Package for February 25th event featuring with Jessi Klein, the Emmy and Peabody award-winning head writer and executive producer of Comedy Central’s critically acclaimed series “Inside Amy Schumer”
  • Arts & Letters Live VIP package #2 for May 3rd event, Happy Hour! A talk, cocktail sampling, and performance inspired by “Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail.”
* Photo credit: Tamytha Cameron Smith

Despite Topsy-Turvy Temps, Dallas Blooms Will Be Abounding With “Peace, Love And Flower Power” Through April 9

Yesterday the temperatures were in the upper 80s. Tonight the mercury will drop to the 30s. This winter has been a roller coaster with wardrobes going from shorts to quilted jackets and back to sandals within hours.

If you think you’ve been dizzy from the changes, take pity on the plants. One minute they’re poking their heads up to spring-like conditions and just as quickly they’re being threatened with frost.

Daryl Kirkham, Mark Clayton and Mark Wolf*

And you just know the Dallas Arboretum folks have had their hands full in preparation for Dallas Blooms that had its Iberiabank sponsor Dallas Market President Daryl Kirkham, Dallas City Councilperson Mark Clayton and Dallas Arboretum Board Chair Mark Wolf on hand for the preview of this year’s theme “Peace, Love and Flower Power.”

This year’s petal extravaganza will “showcase an explosion of color with vintage VW floral topiaries and more than 500,000 spring-blooming blossoms” until Sunday, April 9.

Dallas Arboretum’s Dallas Blooms*

According to Dallas Arboretum President/CEO Mary Brinegar, “Dallas Blooms is the largest display of tulips in a public garden anywhere west of Holland. Later in the festival thousands of azaleas and hundreds of Japanese cherry trees will blossom, leaving breathtaking color at every turn. Guests are sure to have an unforgettable experience this spring in our world-class garden.”

During the run of Dallas Blooms through Sunday, April 9, different activities celebrating the 1960’s theme will take place. From an Ed Sullivan Show-Celebrity Weekend, a music festival throughout the gardens to guests getting henna tattoos, and 1960s fashion on display in the DeGolyer House, it’ll make you dig out your bell bottoms and Nehru jackets.

And as if the Dallas Blooms isn’t enough, the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden will be back in action Saturday after going through its annual winter refreshing.

* Photos provided by Dallas Arboretum

Plans For 4th Annual Great Create Revealed At Forty Five Ten

So who said January was ho-hum? They were obviously so very out of the loop! Thursday, January 12, was a gas spender just trying to make the rounds. Like the Little Black Dress Party Preview at Goodson Audi benefiting Legal Hospice, Dallas was bustling to get back in the groove for fundraising.

Over at Forty Five Ten, the Nasher Sculpture Center’s 4th Annual Great Create was being kicked off. Nasher Director Jeremy Strick fessed up that despite all the fundraisers in Dallas, the Great Create was the most fun.

Not only does it provide a venue for kids to discover wonderment and art thanks to professional artists, it also allows parents to kick back and enjoy a Sunday afternoon in the Nasher’s gardens.

Only problem? Some of the parents wish that there was a similar type of event for parents to bring out their artistic inner selves.

This year’s even will take place on Sunday, April 23, with Lauren and Jason Bender and their children and Janelle and Alden Pinnell and their children co-chairing the fun.

Serving on the host committee are Katie and David AisnerLindsay and Jehan AkhtarLilly Albritton and Chuck BriantLindsey and Dave BeranKristy and Taylor BowenMia and Tyler BrousKatherine and Ken BullockCourtney and Dan CaseAshley and Robert CatheySylvia Cespedes and Hernan Saenz, Emily and Walter ClarkeLindsey and Patrick Collins, Jessica and Doug Epperson, Sara Fay and Merrick EganShannon and Jeff EstesJenney and David GillikinKerri and David GoldfarbJill and Wade HendersonJanie and Dave HodgesMonica and Paul HolmesBrooke HortenstineLindsay and Chuck Jacaman,Cris Jordan and Scott PotterKarey and Josh KitfieldSunny and Craig KnockeErica and Trey Kuppin, Hallie and Max LamontNicolette and Miles Lamont, Katie and Pierre Lavie, Laura and Frederick Lear, Sheryl and Eric Maas, Catherine and Doug MacMahon, Tracy and Josh Madans, Louise and Charles Marsh, Erin and Mike McKool, Paula and Todd Minnis, Meredith and Xan MooreLucy and Thomas MortonLucy and Will MurchisonJessica and Dirk NowitzkiAnnie and Tim O’GradyKristin and Aaron Ortega, Katie and Kyle OudtNatalie and Dirik OudtJessica and Tyson PinnellAlison and Cullen PowellKristie RamirezKristin and Ricky Rees, Katherine and Eric ReevesBrooke and Rod RobersonStephanie and John RobertsLisa and John Runyon, Cheryl and Andrew SchoellkopfAmanda and Charlie ShufeldtRobyn and Michael SiegelCourtney and Jeff SinelliNicole and Justin Small, Helene and Sandy SpurginMelina and Randy StarrDenise and Chris StewartRachel and Chris TrowbridgeGwendolyn and Richard Turcotte,Bianca and Bo WatsonClaudia and Brian WingMegan and Brady WoodLucy and Steve WrubelErika and Matt Yeaman, Lyssa and D’Arcy YoungRenee and Bob Yttredahl and Marjon Zabihi and Gibbs Henderson.

Starting at $500 for four, tickets are available now plus sponsorships.

JUST IN: Artscape Reimagined 2017 Chair Kaki Hopkins Announces Craig Hall To Receive The First Great Contributor To Art Award And Much More Deets

Due to circumstances way beyond our control, the next couple of days are going to be filled with announcements galore thanks to those wonderful people who bring you fundraising in North Texas. The news will be revealed as soon as it breaks.

The very first on the lineup just took place, courtesy of Artscape Reimagined 2017 Chair Kaki Hopkins, who never tackles any project in a lightweight manner. She gathered a crowd of folks, including many of her 48-member committee, at Dallas Arboretum’s DeGolyer House this evening to reveal plans for the upcoming Artscape Reimagined 2017.

Kaki Hopkins (File photo)

Craig Hall (File photo)

The eyebrow-raising headline of the evening was the creation of the Great Contributor to Art Award in association with the garden’s fine art and craft show. And to kick the launch of the award off with a bang, she announced the very first recipient will be entrepreneur/best-selling author/philanthropist/vineyard owner Craig Hall.

According to Kaki, “Craig Hall embodies the spirit of this award. He is someone who collects art not for himself but for the benefit of the communities in which we live and work, and we are excited to honor him.”

Craig will be presented with the Gary Lee Price-designed award on Friday, May 12, at the Artscape Award and Auction Dinner in the Arboretum’s Rosine Hall.

With wife Kathryn Hall standing nearby, Craig said, “I am a strong believer in the importance of public art and the incredible effect it can have on its audience. Art has the ability to touch the soul and make people think, and it should be shared openly and democratically. The Dallas Arboretum, through its public art exhibits, sculptures throughout the garden and Artscape, is a great example of how our city is embracing public art, and I am glad to be a part of it.”

Patricia Meadows (File photo)

Regarding Artscape itself, it will feature more than 100 renowned artists from around the country thanks to the Artscape jury including Chair  Patricia Meadows, Katherine Wagner and Marty Ray with assistance by Gail Sachson. This year’s show will feature “a variety of mediums including paintings, sculpture, 2-D and 3-D mixed media, photography, fiber, ceramics and more.” But leave it to Kaki to have ramped it up to live up to its Artscape Reimagined theme, like:

  • An architect-designed landscape layout with decorative signage and boulevards that provide excellent audience flow and heightened visibility for the artists.
  • The historic DeGolyer House transformed into the DeGolyer Gallery, featuring local Dallas galleries presenting works by artists they represent
  • The University Zone, where approximately 10 universities will show and sell works by their professors and students.

And it will all take place with the Arboretum grounds in full bloom, thanks to dazzling azaleas. The schedule calls for the member preview on Friday, April 28, with the public viewings on the following Saturday (April 29) and Sunday (April 30).  

As an additional offering, Artscape guests will also be able to check out ZimSculpt, the exhibition of “modern Zimbabwean stone sculptures that will be incorporated into the garden” from Saturday, April 15 through Monday, July 31. This collection of more than 100 hand-carved pieces will be the first time that the sculptures will be on display in the southern U.S. During their stay, Zimbabwean artists Aron Kapembeza and Passmore Mupindiko will be on hand to demonstrate how the stone is carved into modern art.

BTW, tickets for the Artscape Award and Auction Dinner are $300 per guest and will be available for purchase on Monday, February 6.

MySweet2017Goals: Michael Faircloth

Michael Faircloth (File photo)

According to UNT Distinguished Alumnus/designer Michael Faircloth

“My 2017 goal is to wrap up fund-raising for The Michael Faircloth School of Fashion Design Endowment Fund capital campaign at the University of North Texas. I am honored to have my name associated with this great institution and I am hopeful many students will benefit from this important educational experience.

“With an emphasis on art research, fashion history and trend analysis, UNT’s fashion design students learn to take their ideas from inception, to sketch, to finished garment. They also learn practical skills like patternmaking, draping, fashion sketching, industrial sewing and computer-aided design that lead to rewarding careers.”

Dr. Dan DeMarco Got Pretty Gutsy At The Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board Luncheon

The word “gut” is usually not one that comes up at lunch. But on Tuesday, December 13, the Baylor Health Care System Foundation Board literally gutted up to learn about gastrointestinal research and developments.

Paula Walker

Ashley Jones

But before it kicked off, the Board members were entertained by musicians and artists like Ashley Jones from Baylor’s Arts in Medicine program at Sammons Cancer Center. Developed by Bonnie Pittman, the program is provided free-of-charge for cancer patients at Baylor as a creative therapy thanks to a donation by Paula Walker. Another part of the program is for musicians to play at bedside. When the program began in 2015, there were 300 requests for musical practitioners. This past year the monthly rate had risen to more than 2,000.

Margo Goodwin, Leonard Riggs and Annette Simmons

Amy Turner

Jerry Fullinwider and Martha Hackbarth

As guests like Nancy Dedman, Kelly Green, Richard Holt, Kathy Crow, Michal Powell, Amy Turner, Julie Turner, Su-Su Meyer, Leonard Riggs, Annette Simmons, Jerry Fullinwider, Martha Hackbarth, Trisha Wilson, Randi Halsell, Jill Smith, Paul Stoffel, Sharon McCullough, ­­­Lana and Barry Andrews and Tavia Hunt settled in their chairs at the Sammons Cancer Center, Foundation Chair Margo Goodwin reported that Celebrating Women Luncheon Chair Aileen Pratt and Underwriting Chair Gloria Eulich Martindale had raised $1.8M for breast cancer research. Taking over the leadership for the 2017 Celebrating Women will be Tucker Enthoven as luncheon chair and Ola Fojasek as underwriting chair. 

Aileen Pratt

Tavia Hunt

With tongue firmly in cheek, Margo explained that due to the day’s subject matter the presentation would be held after the meal was consumed.

No need. For the presentation, Margo and Baylor Health Care System Foundation President Robin Robinson had gotten retired Dr. Dan DeMarco to explain the various components of the digestive system. In introducing Dan, Robin admitted that he had done research by reading “Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ” by Giulia Enders. He described it as “a really cheeky, easy-to-read guide about both the secrets and the science of our digestive system. I recommend it. It’s a neat read.”

Dan DeMarco

And, yes, the topic did have a “yuck factor” about it, but with the charm of a leprechaun and the knowledge and skill of a recognized health care provider, Dan took the SRO crowd through the various steps of the gastrointestinal system, or as Robin put it, “from stem to stern.”

 Dan started off by recalling years ago, an Australian doctor — Dr. Barry Marshall — claimed that bacteria, not acid, caused ulcers. Experts poo-pooed the idea, despite the doctor’s even swallowing bacteria to prove his point. Years later, he was proved right and won the 2005 Noble Prize.  

In addition to “Gut,” Dan suggested another book that was easy-to-read-and-digest: “Gulp” by Mary Roach.

Then he rolled out some facts that impressed one and all.

  • 80% of our immune cells reside in the gut
  • The gut sends emotional signal to the brain — suggesting we “feel” with our gut first.
  • Gastro-intestinal conditions can be seen as the “mental illness” of your gut.
  • Food affects your mood, and not just “comfort food.”
  • You have 10 times as many microbes as cells in your body. The health of these communities determines your overall health. Collectively, these communities are called the microbiome.
  • Digestive insufficiencies contribute to a wide range of health issues, including migraine headaches, depression, arthritis, autism, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, multiple sclerosis and more.
  • Lactose intolerance increases with age.
  • Gluten sensitivity is “relatively rare. It has to be confirmed with blood testing and intestinal biopsy. Certainly people do feel different on a gluten-free diet. People swear by it, but it’s probably not just the gluten. It’s due to other factors.”
  • Antibiotics kill bacteria. With the wide-spread use of antibiotics, the few bacteria that the antibiotics don’t kill get stronger, become resistant and become super bugs. Not everything should be treated with antibiotics.
  • Probiotics encourage the growth of good bacteria that help the digestive system.
  • Microbiome is the entire community of germs. By analyzing the microbiome, it is possible to create an individual’s “fingerprint” regarding their makeup. For instance, if antibiotics are given the first two or three years of life, they influence the microbiome.
  • Microbiome may have more of an effect on our makeup and well-being than genetics.
  • Diseases like Parkinsons, Lupus and others may be the result of the microbiome.
  • Microbiome is affected by whether you were born via C-section or natural delivery and if you were breast fed.
  • The gut affects the immune system, moods, personality and attitude. About 95% of the body’s serotonin is found in the gut. The gut is sometimes referred to as “The Second Brain.”
  • The small intestine is 21 feet long, which results in food taking about six hours to reach the colon.

The small intestine’s length was one of the challenges that had faced the medical community in detecting health problems. It was only accessible via the operating room. The traditional colonoscopy could only go so far, Dan said, but he had been involved in the creation of a new treatment combining the Double Balloon Scope and Spiral Component being “dropped from the top down.” The result was the shortening of the intestine “like rolling up your sleeve.” This procedure made it possible for the small intestine to be examined without trauma and reduced the six-hour traditional examination to a mere 30 minutes. It is currently going through national clinical trials for approval.

Another developments that is being tested at Baylor is the TransPyloric Shuttle for moderately overweight people and fecal transplants for colon diseases.

In conclusion, Dan discussed the gastroenterologist fellows program at Baylor in which, each year, two are selected to be part of the three-year program after finishing their training as internal medicine doctors. Emphasizing the need for gastroenterologists, he added that those participating in the fellowship program tended to stay locally.

To summarize his presentation, he suggested three take-home points:

  1. Think outside of the box
  2. Embrace new technology
  3. Keep learning, keep teaching and “support our fellowship program.”

Upon his retirement, Dan and his wife, Dr. Cara East, created an endowment to support a fellowship and, thanks to the Baylor Health Care System Foundation, more than a million dollars was raised resulting in the DeMarco Fellow each year that is fully funded.

Jim Turner and Joel Allison

Following Dan’s presentation, Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees Chair Jim Turner told the foundation board members about the new Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Jim Hinton and extolled the accomplishments of retiring Baylor Scott & White Health CEO Joel Allison. Among them: during Joel’s 23-year tenure, he grew Baylor from a $1-billion asset healthcare system to $10 billion today; the merger with Scott & White; heading up 45,000 employees, 48 hospitals and countless other undertakings resulting in Baylor being one of the top ten not-for-profit healthcare companies in the country and the leading not-for-profit in Texas.

While Joel will officially retire on his birthday (Wednesday, February 1), he will remain as an advisor to Jim Turner. This relationship dates back to their days at Baylor University, when Jim was on the basketball team and Joel played football.

The Edith O’Donnell Institute Of Art History Lecture Hosted Keynote Speaker Philippe De Montebello For Heavy-Hitting Art Lovers

Once again The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History Lecture didn’t disappoint on Tuesday, November 29, at the Dallas Museum of Art. With world-renowned art authority Philippe de Montebello as the keynote speaker, it was no wonder that some of Dallas’ art elite were on hand for the lecture and dinner. Here’s a report from the field:

Bill Solmon, Peter O’Donnell, Gay Solomon and Edith O’Donell*

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at The University of Texas at Dallas hosted a lecture and dinner on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 at the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA). Dr. Richard C. Benson, President of The University of Texas at Dallas; Dr. Richard R. Brettell, Founding Director of The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History; and Dr. Agustín Arteaga, The Eugene McDermott Director of the Dallas Museum of Art, welcomed over 250 guests including William Jordan, Susan Marcus, Robert Brownlee, Nancy Dedman, Brad Kelly, Joanne Stroud, Carole and John Ridings Lee, Linda and Bill Custard, Dan Patterson, Mary McDermott Cook, Leslie Benson, Gay and Bill Solomon, Beverly and Don Freeman, Brenda Berry, Rima and Eric Lee, Patricia Patterson and Catherine Rose for the third annual event.

Leslie and Richard Benson*

Carole and John Ridings Lee*

Patricia Patterson and Catherine Rose*

William Jordan, Susan Marcus and Robert Brownlee*

As guests arrived, they mingled over cocktails and light hors d’oeuvres in the Museum’s concourse before convening in the Horchow Auditorium for the evening’s lecture.

Dr. Arteaga welcomed attendees to the DMA and thanked them for their support of the evening, before introducing Dr. Benson. Dr. Benson gave a brief introduction of The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at UTD, a center for innovative research and graduate education in the history of art. Founded as a partnership between UTD and the DMA, the Institute links one of the country’s great public art collections with one of the finest public university systems in the world.

Dr. Brettell then took the podium and shared details about some of the Institute’s exciting partnerships, including the Museo di Capodimonte in Naples. Museo di Capodimonte Director Sylvain Bellenger followed, providing the history of the museum which is located in the Palace of Capodimonte, as well as images of the palazzo and its renowned collections.

Sylvain Bellenger, Philippe de Montebello, Agustin Arteaga and Richard Brettell*

Dr. Brettell returned to introduce the evening’s featured speaker, Philippe de Montebello, professor of History and Culture of Museums at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts and past director of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Montebello enthralled the crowd with his lecture about “The Multiple Lives of Works of Art,” by sharing beautiful images as well as his extensive knowledge and expertise.

For more information, visit The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History.

* Photos provided by Edith O'Donnell Institute of Art History

JUST IN: 2017 Equest Gala Plans Announced For Field Of Dreams With Kathy And Jeromy Fielder As Co-Chairs

From the left: (back row) Alanna Sarabie, Andrea Reich, Gretchen Darby, Dare, Keetha Hanlin, Regina Bruce, Melissa Vullo Bell and Renee Farinella; (front row) Dianna Pietra, Deve Sandord, Kathy Fielder and Britt Harless*

Despite last night’s dreary, wet weather, the horse-loving Equest crowd headed over to Samuel Lynne Galleries. The draw was not a new exhibition on horses. Rather it was the kick-off reception for the 2017 Equest Gala. Upstaging the art on the walls were the Equest mini-ambassadors, Cisco and Dare. It was the pair’s first visit to the gallery and vice versa.

Lili Kellogg, Jocelyn White, Lynn McBee and Susan Schwartz*

On hand to hear the news were Samuel Lynne

Co-Founder/artist JD Miller and his artist wife Lea Fisher Miller, Dan Pritchett, Deve Sanford, Mimi Noland, Nicole Barrett, Doug Murray, Georgette Doukas, Alanna Sarabie, Andrea Reich, Gretchen Darby, Keetha Hanlin, Regina Bruce, Melissa Vullo Bell, Renee Farinella, Dianna Pietra, Britt Harless, Debbie Murray, Regina Bruce, Heather “Miss Texas Teen” King, past Equest Chairman of the Board/Gala Chair Jocelyn White, Equest Co-Founder Susan Schwartz and Chairman of the Board Andy Steingasser.

Laura and Jason Cope*

JD Miller*

Equest CEO Lili Kellogg revealed the news of the night. This year’s theme will be “Field of Dreams” with Co-Chairs Kathy and Jeromy Fielder and Honorary Co-Chairs Lynn and Allan McBee.

It will take place on Saturday, April 29, at Texas Horse Park with “gourmet southern cuisine, craft cocktails, live music and much-desired live and silent auction items.”    

There will be a demonstration of how Equest is making such a difference in peoples’ lives, head patting with Texas Horse Park residents and dancing to Texas Country Music. What were you expecting — minuets?

While sponsorships start at $5,000, Lili announced that “the first Gala sponsor to contribute a minimum of $15,000 or more” would receive an original horse photo donated by photographer Laura Cope.

For smart folks who reach the VIP status, the horse-ing around will start at 6:30, while the rest of the herd will hit the doors at 7. Since there is no on-site parking, shuttles will be available.

* Photo credit: Bob Manzano

From An Olympian Gold Medalist To An Opera CEO, The Awards Of Excellence Celebrated A Wide Range Of Achievers

One of the favorite award luncheons of the fall season is the Dallas Historical Society‘s Awards for Excellence. Just the week before Thanksgiving on Thursday, November 17, the lovers of Dallas history and those who help make it all come true were at the Fairmont for the handing out of awards and the legendary A.C. Greene champagne toast. Here’s a report from the field:

The Board of Trustees of the Dallas Historical Society, with Honorary Co-Chairs Gail Thomas, PhD and Robert Hyer Thomas and co-chairs Veletta Forsythe Lill and Mary Suhm, welcomed over 650 attendees to the 35th Awards for Excellence (AFE) in Community Service luncheon on Thursday, November 17, at the Fairmont Dallas.

May Suhm, Amy Aldredge and Veletta Forsythe Lill*

As attendees arrived and took their seats, Master of Ceremonies Stewart Thomas welcomed everyone to the 35th annual celebration, which recognizes individuals who have demonstrated generosity of spirit, civic leadership, and ability to encourage community-wide participation in a particular phase of the growth of the city. He then welcomed Reverend Richie Butler, senior pastor of St Paul United Methodist Church, for the invocation. 

Following the invocation, guests enjoyed a first course of spring pea and ham soup en croute with mint cream, followed by roasted chicken breast with demi glace served with old school stacked potatoes, arugula and carrot cardamom puree. Thomas returned to introduce Co-Chairs Veletta and Mary.

Bob and Gail Thomas*

Ms. Lill and Ms. Suhm expressed their gratitude to attendees, event sponsors and the luncheon committee for their support of this year’s Awards for Excellence, particularly Honorary Co-Chairs Gail Thomas and Robert Hyer Thomas. Applauding the couple’s many contributions to Dallas, including their long-standing support of the Dallas Historical Society, the co-chairs announced that two special books would be donated in the Thomas’ honor to the G.B. Dealey Library and Reading Room at the Hall of State: for Bob, Darwin Payne‘s “One Hundred Years On The Hilltop: The Centennial History of Southern Methodist University” and for Gail:  the late historian A. C. Greene‘s “A Town Called Cedar Springs” for creating the sense of community from the many former historic villages that now comprise Greater Dallas.

Dallas Historical Society Board of Trustees Chair Bill Helmbrecht then took the podium recognizing event co-chairs and honorary chairs as well as Amy Aldredge, the Dallas Historical Society’s recently appointed executive director. Additionally, he thanked Arrangements Chair Shannon Callewart, Master of Ceremonies Stewart Thomas, AFE Coordinator Louise Caldwell, Caro Stalcup and Staff Liaison Nora Lenhart for all the dedicated hours they put in to making the event a success.

He also shared the impact the Dallas Historical Society makes with its holdings of over three million archives and artifacts related to Dallas and Texas history, its exhibits and events, including two upcoming exhibits, “Polly Smith: A Texas Journey” and “Drawing Power: The Editorial Art of John Knott” and its education and public programs which reach approximately 20,000 area school students annually.

As dessert of caramel pecan cheesecake with salted caramel and Texas pecans was served, Stewart returned to recognize the 2016 Awards for Excellence in Community Service recipients.  Each recipient was presented with their award by co-chairs Lill and Suhm.  

Keith Cerny, Holly Mayer and Emmanuel Villaume*

Anita Martinez, Eliseo Garcia and Patricia Meadows*

Richard Stanford and Pat Mattingly*

Hugh Aynesworth and Pierce Allman*

2016 Awards for Excellence recipients:

    • Arts Leadership – Keith Cerny, general director and CEO of the Dallas Opera
    • Business – Leonard M. Riggs Jr. M.D., noted Dallas civic leader who began his career as an emergency physician, became chief of emergency medicine at Baylor University Medical Center, and later founded the precursor of EmCare, Inc.
    • Creative Arts – Eliseo Garcia, international multi-media sculptor
    • Education – Pat Mattingly, long-time educator and former 26-year director of The Lamplighter School
    • History – Hugh Aynesworth, award-winning journalist and writer
    • Humanities – Molly Bogen, retired 40-year director of Senior Source
    • Medical Research – Eric Olson, renowned molecular biologist specializing at UT Southwestern Medical Center
    • Philanthropy – Linda Perryman Evans, president and CEO of the Meadows Foundation
    • Sports Leadership – Michael Johnson, four-time Olympic gold medalist and eight-time World Championship gold medalist
    • Volunteer Community Leadership – Philip C. Henderson, architect and urban visionary and first president of the Friends of the Katy Trail
    • Volunteer Community Leadership – Frederick “Shad” Rowe, co-founder of GIBI Investment Symposium and advocate and board member of the Michael J. Fox Foundation
    • Jubilee History Maker – Margot Perot, community volunteer and philanthropist

Nancy Shelton and Molly Bogen*

David Dunnagan and Linda Perryman Evans*

Glenn Solomon, Louise Caldwell and Michael Johnson*

Shad Rowe and Willing Ryan*

Carol Montgomery and Margot Perot*

After the awards presentation, champagne was served to all attendees as well as recipients on stage. Stewart returned to the podium, with glass in hand, to conclude with the event’s traditional A.C. Greene toast:  “Would everyone who was born in Dallas, please stand up.  Would everyone who was born in Texas, please stand up. We toast the rest of you – who were smart enough to move here as fast as you could! Here! Here!”

The A.C. Greene toast*

As the event concluded, the Judy Moore Duo played the event’s signature song, “Big D” from the musical, “Most Happy Fella.”

Proceeds from the annual fundraiser support the Dallas Historical Society and its dedication to the preservation of Dallas and Texas history through its many programs, including educational outreach and public programs.

* Photo credit: Steve Foxall

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: The Claus Collection Santa Exhibition

The Dallas Arboretum will be closed on Christmas Day. And while the official word is that this closure allows the staff to be with their families and friends, the unofficial word is that there is an exclusive party taking place in the DeGoyler House.

Reserved annually for this festive event, the stately mansion is where Santa parties with Mrs. Claus, the elves and the reindeer after delivering toys and before heading back to the North Pole.

The Claus Collection Santa Exhibition

In addition to the eggnog, decorated cookies and fruitcake (yes, Santa does like fruitcake, especially from Corsicana), the highlight of this year’s occasion is the hundreds of Santas provided by members of the Junior League of Dallas at The Claus Collection Santa Exhibition.

The Claus Collection Santa Exhibition

The Claus Collection Santa Exhibition

By Monday morning Santa and his crew will have headed home, but the collection of Kris Kringles will still be on display along with the 12 Days of Christmas throughout the grounds until Sunday, January 8.

For your consideration, check the MySweetCharity Photo Gallery for a smattering of the Saint Nicks.

Dallas Museum Of Art Speakeasy’s Raffle Is Gonna Be The Bargain Of The Shakened, Stirred And Styled Season

Dallas Museum of Art’s Speakeasy celebrating is going to have such a bargain raffle on Saturday, February 4, at the DMA. If you can afford a cup of coffee at Ascension, you can afford a couple of chance tickets. But first, here is the lineup of the five raffle packages:

  • The Joule Hotel and Midnight Rambler Package:  Lavish in the thoughtful comfort and luxury of The Joule.  With dramatic art installations, unique retail boutiques, a world-class spa, clever design, award-winning food and drinks and some of the best service in town, The Joule is seen as the cultural epicenter of downtown. Enjoy a one night get away in deluxe accommodations with complimentary overnight valet parking and a $100 gift card for food and beverage at the premier craft cocktail bar, the Midnight Rambler. 
  • Fossil® Q Wander rose gold stainless and Q Marshal in brown leather: Q Wander and Q Marshal are Fossil’s newest digital display watches that connects seamlessly to your phone. The tech-savvy dial with touchscreen functionality tracks everything from daily steps to calories. Notifications alert you of incoming calls and texts. *Powered by Android Wear™ (but compatible with iOS and Android wear phones) this smartwatch tracks activity, connects to your favorite apps, receives display notifications, and has customizable faces and interchangeable strap options to fit your style. Noticeable design details include slim lugs on Q Wander and a rugged bezzle on Q Marshal for an updated design look on a smarter watch. 
  • Victor Tangos and Bella and Chloe:  Enjoy a $150-shopping spree at Bella and Chloe/Brethren Boutique. Touting men’s and women’s boho wears, this shop is known for precious metals and stones from all around the world. Bella and Chloe is an American made brand known for the effortlessly cool, unbound, and bohemian soul translating culture through style and youthful freedom. Then stroll across the street to Victor Tangos wear you have $100 on the house! Always in the top ten of places to grab a craft cocktail and savory meal, Victor Tangos is the home to Rising Star Chef of the Year, Chef Kirstyn Brewer!   
  • Martini glass, c. 2001 by Valeri Timofeev*

    Ultra-Luxe Roxor Gin Experience: Six tickets to a private curator tour through the “Shaken, Stirred, Styled” exhibition. Then, enjoy an exclusive Roxor cocktail-making class, perched 19 floors above Klyde Warren Park and the DMA, in a private residence. The owners of this Dallas-distilled gin will explain how gin is made and the unique botanicals used in Roxor. Each guest will enjoy crafting three cocktails, complemented by fashionable hors d’oeuvres. A Roxor memorable experience!

  • Arts & Letters Live VIP package #1Jessi Klein is the Emmy and Peabody award-winning head writer and executive producer of Comedy Central’s critically acclaimed series “Inside Amy Schumer.” Growing up gawkish and a late bloomer, Jessi Klein never identified with the conventional standards of modern femininity. Instead she viewed herself as a tomboy who found her voice through comedy. In her outrageously funny and unapologetically candid breakout book, “You’ll Grow Out of It,” Klein compiles a perceptive collection of confessional essays that offer readers a relatable glimpse into exactly what it means to be a woman in today’s world.  Package winners will receive reserved seating, tickets to the event, one copy of the book, and fast track passes for the book signing following the event.   Saturday, February 25, 7:30 p.m.              
  • Arts & Letters Live VIP package #2:  Arts & Letters Live presents “Happy Hour!” A talk, cocktail sampling, and performance inspired by “Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail.”  6:15-7:00 p.m. Pre-performance talk/Q&A and cocktails in the DMA’s Founders Room with David Wondrich, one of the world’s foremost authorities on cocktails and their history; author of the book Imbibe!, which won a James Beard Award.   7:30 p.m. Happy Hour! Performance: The DMA’s exhibition “Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail” packs just the punch required for five acclaimed musicians to create an adventurous concoction of rhythm, music, and text, to be enjoyed responsibly for one night only. Songs will range from Mozart, Offenbach, and Verdi to Cole Porter and Joni Mitchell. This marks the ninth collaboration of Arts and Letters Live with artistic programmer Ryan Taylor, whose creative process combines art, music, and literary excerpts.  Package winners will receive two tickets to the pre-event talk/Q&A, cocktails, a copy of the book “Imbibe!,” reserved seating,  and two tickets for the performance.  Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Sounds good. But let’s think about stupendous great. Chance tickets will be going for $1 each. Hello? One buck? Ten dimes? Yup! And to make it even better and easier for shy types, the raffle tickets are available online, so you don’t have to chat it up with anyone.

The winners will be announced at 11 p.m. the night of the fundraiser, but you don’t need to be present to win.

Martini glasses (File photo)

But then you’ll want to be on the scene. Besides blushing and hollering when your name is called, you’ll want to be part of the jazz babies, who are going to be adding to the “Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail.”

So, why not splurge and go high hog with VIP tickets for the party, buy a fistful of chance tickets and party the night away?

BTW, get there early because self-parking will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

MySweetWishList: Spark!

According to Spark! President and CEO Beverly Davis,

Spark! is a non-profit organization on a mission to ignite the Spark of creativity inherent in all children. Since opening its doors in June 2015, Spark! has served more than 7,500 children, 45 percent from low income homes.

By the age of 16, children decide if they are creative or not. If they identify as a creative individual, they have higher self-esteem, better problem-solving skills and go further in their education. Through creative programming and play in a fully immersive creative environment, Spark! helps children, in second grade through high school, understand their full creative potential. Here is one story that illustrates the impact Spark! is making on young minds.

Spark!*

In April 2015, Spark! celebrated World Creativity and Innovation Week and invited 24 students from Communities in Schools to experience creative immersion during the first-ever Spark! field trip. These students experimented with recycled art by designing and painting hubcaps that would later be installed on a wavy bridge made of car hoods.

Spark! officially opened the week of June 9. That week, two students from Communities and Schools came back to Spark! a second time. One young lady found the hubcap she painted was hanging from the bridge, and she quickly began showing it to her friends. The confidence she gained from spending time at Spark! is precisely the result that these programs strive to produce. “It’s really amazing to know that a hubcap can be made into art and that my experience could be so great,” she said.

Give the gift of creativity this year, with a membership to Spark! This new, affordable membership program offers unique incentives including birthday party discounts and tickets to VIP events. Members will enjoy unlimited visits to the learning environment during public hours. No matter which level you choose, your membership becomes an even better value with each visit. Packages range from $75-$2,500 per year.

Through memberships and donations, you’ll help further the mission of igniting the creativity inherent in more than 6,000 North Texas children in 2017.

Visit www.Sparkdallas.org/memberships, call 214-421-7727 or email [email protected] for more information.

-By Beverly Davis, Spark! president and CEO

* Graphic provided by Spark!

Business And Art Community Leadership Turned Out For The Sold-Out 2016 Obelisk Awards Luncheon At Belo Mansion

The Business Council For The Arts was the brainchild of the late Ray Nasher. His hope was for the Dallas business community to get more involved and supportive of the various art organization. At the time the Performing Arts District was just on a wish list. But over the years, the Council evolved, adding a presentation of the Obelisk Awards to those businesses and art organizations that had shown true leadership in building Dallas’ arts. On Monday, November 7, Belo Mansion was filled to the brim for the presentation of the Obelisk Awards and to hear a moving presentation by Dallas Symphony Orchestra principle trumpet Ryan Anthony. Here is a report from the field:

This sold-out event on Monday, November 7, at Belo Mansion has been recognizing individuals and organizations that provide stellar nonprofit and business support for arts and culture for 28 years. As Obelisk Awards Co-Chair, Kevin Hurst said, “Some of the honorees are well-known to us and others are being recognized publicly for the first time.”  Kevin’s partner-in-celebration, Co-Chair Dotti Reeder added, “Their stories give us a unique perspective into mutually beneficial partnerships between businesses and the arts.”

Kevin Hurst, Mimi Sterling, Jennifer Lassiter and Jeff Byron

The 2016 Obelisk Awards honorees and those that nominated them were  

  • Arts Partnership Award (Large) — Fossil Group, nominated by Big Thought
  • Arts Partnership Award (Medium) — Taxco Food Produce, nominated by The Mexico Institute
  • Arts Partnership Award (Small) — Watters Creek at Montgomery Farms, nominated by Allen Art Alliance
  • New Initiatives Award (Large) — Cash America, nominated by Junior Players
  • New Initiatives Award (Medium) — UMB Bank, nominated by The Dallas Opera
  • New Initiatives Award (Small) — The Law Offices of Eric Cedillo, nominated by Cara Mia Theater
  • Meghan Hipsher and Lee Papert

    Distinguished Nonprofit Arts Organization — Dallas Film Society, nominated by ABCO Inc.

  • Outstanding Leadership Arts Alumnus Award — Zenetta Drew, nominated by Leadership Women
  • Business Champion for the Arts — Darrell Rodenbaugh, nominated by Plano Children’s Theatre & North Texas Performing Arts

Capera Ryan, Mark Roglan and Deborah Ryan

This year, Dr. Mark Roglán, Linda Pitts Custard Director of the Meadows Museum at SMU, became the inaugural honoree of the award for Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader. He was nominated by arts patron and professional, Patricia Meadows. The Meadows Museum and the Dallas Film Society were honored with donations from Tolleson Wealth Management and Neiman Marcus Group, in addition to the award.

Dotti Reeder and Larry Glasgow

Presentations by the esteemed co-chairs, BCA Board Chair Larry Glasgow and arts icon Nancy Nasher were followed by Ryan Anthony, Principal Trumpet and Diane and Hal Brierley Chair of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra.  If you’ve been reading this column, you know that Ryan is the charismatic world-talent who is battling Multiple Myeloma. He and his wife, Niki Anthony, along with many friends, have founded CancerBlows: the Ryan Anthony Foundation. Ryan’s mesmerizing words and performances – two, in fact – led to a standing ovation. Mark your calendars for Wednesday, May 10, and get your tickets now to see 30 world-renowned musicians playing together to fund a cure.

Andrea Devaldenebro, David Hamilton and Lona Crabb

Billy Hines and Jack Savage

Gerald Turner, Hal and Diane Brierley, Rhealyn Carter and Brad Cheves

In the crowd were Patricia Porter and Dennis Kratz, NorthPark Center’s Lona Crabb, Billy Hines and Andrea Devaldenebro, as well as Jack Boles’s David Hamilton and Meghan Hipsher, SMU’s Gerald Turner and Brad Cheves and Neiman’s Jeff Byron and Mimi Sterling.

KERA Vice President for Arts/Art & Seek Director Anne Bothwell expertly articulated just why each of the honorees is praiseworthy. Obviously a quick study, Anne stepped in when the traditional Master of Ceremonies, Mary Anne Alhadeff, was hit with a bout of bronchitis.

Blending the perfect mix of artistry with business professionalism, the Obelisk Awards logo, program and invitation were designed by graphics maestro Leon Banowetz and his team. We’re sure the brilliant centerpieces, created by Shirley Richardson of Big Box, Little Box are going to inspire mimicry. Not to be outdone, each of the awards is an original artwork, hand-blown by Jim Bowman of Bowman Studios.

Suffice to say that all of the attendants to the event are subscribers to the importance of business support. Lead sponsors for this year’s Obelisk Awards were: NorthPark Management, Capital One and Diane and Hal Brierley.  Table sponsorship was provided by Andrews Kurth LLP, Artemis Fine Art Services, Baker Botts LLP, Banowetz + Company, Inc.,  The Beck Group, BenefitMall, Big Thought, Bourland Octave Management, LLC, Comerica,  Corgan, City of Richardson, The Dallas Opera, Deloitte, LLP, Eiseman Jewels NorthPark Center, Fisher & Phillips LLP, Fossil Group, Frost Bank, Gardere Wynne Sewell LLP, Sherry and Kenny Goldberg, Harwood International,  Haynes and Boone LLP, HKS, Jack Boles Parking NPP, Jones Day, Leadership Arts Alumni, The Law Firm of Eric Cedillo, Maintenance of America Inc., Patricia Meadows, Morrison, Dilworth, & Walls, Neiman Marcus, Oncor, Parkland Health & Hospital System,  Powell Coleman & Arnold LLP, PwC, Southern Methodist University, Taxco Produce, Texas Instruments, Thompson & Knight LLP, Tolleson Wealth Management, Tucker David Investments, LP, University of North Texas, The University of Texas at Dallas, Patricia Villareal and Tom Leatherbury, Vinson & Elkins LLP, Whiting-Turner Contracting Company. Additionally, donations in honor of Ryan and Niki Anthony were made by Diane and Hal Brierley, Anne and Steven Stodghill and D’Andra Simmons.

What does next year hold? You’ll have to ask 2017 Obelisk Co-Chairs Thai and Steve Roth! BTW, nominations for the 2017 awards are due Friday, April 14.

Music, Dinner And Art “Ramped Up” Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center’s “Art For Advocacy” Fundraiser To The Next Level

Amy Hofland Lewis and Tara Lewis*

Everyone agreed: Co-Chairs Amy Lewis Hofland and Tara Lewis really “ramped it up” for the 10th annual Art for Advocacy auction event Saturday, November 5, at the General Datatech Warehouse space on Ambassador Row. The event, as always, benefited the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center, which was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Over the last decade the annual bash has raised about $3 million to provide therapy and other services to abused children in Dallas County.

This year, though, things were upped a notch. The handsome tech space was an expansive contrast to FIG, the venue in previous years. This time around, there was a delicious seated dinner that was catered by Bolsa. And, following a successful art auction by maestro Louis Murad, big-time entertainment by the popular indie singer/songwriter Sarah Jaffe capped the evening.

Sofia Sugasti and Nancy Carlson*

Tom and Kathi Lind*

First, though, the nearly 700 guests enjoyed a cocktail reception and a close-up gander at all the art on the walls. About 100 local and regional artists were participating in the display, under the direction of Art Selection honcho Joyce Goss. Among those strolling and checking everything out were Honorary Chair Nancy Carlson, Kara and Randall Goss, Brian Bolke and Faisal Halum, Keith Nix, James Anbouba (“We always bid on a few items,” he said—“in fact, we have no more wall space!), Sofia Sugasti, Thomas Hartland-Mackie, Barry Whistler, Rachel and Hampton Richards, Kathi and Tom Lind, Nick Even and Clark Knippers and Kersten Rettig (still wearing a black boot, months after that mishap in Arkansas).

Holly Johnson, Nancy Cohen Israel and Solomon Israel*

Following a talk by DCAC president and CEO Lynn Davis—he said the nonprofit group helped more than 4,000 children in 2015—auctioneer Murad took the stage, and the artwork began flying into the high bidders’ hands. A photo called “Moth” by Maxine Helfman, for example, was valued at $8,000 but went for $12,000; Megan Adams Brooks’ “Blindspot” painting,” valued at $7,800, sold for $9,000; and Shane Pennington’s copper-wire sculpture called “I Look Up In Wonder” was valued at $14,500, but wound up trading hands for a whopping $25,000.

Sarah Jaffe*

So much excitement had been created, in fact, that one man popped up on stage and announced, “I’m going to match whatever anybody gives tonight, up to $100,000!” A little later, Sarah Jaffe and her band strummed their first notes. Ramped up, indeed.

For a look at some of the sponsors, who made this possible, follow the jump:

* Photo credit: Dane Davis

[Read more…]

MySweetWishList: 2017 Art In Bloom

According to Art in Bloom 2017 Chair Sarah Jo Hardin,

Sarah Jo Hardin*

Sarah Jo Hardin*

“My wish is that everyone will make plans to join the Dallas Museum of Art League for Art in Bloom 2017:  Seasons of Love, an annual floral symposium and luncheon, on Monday, March 27, 2017 at the Museum at 9:30 a.m. Proceeds support the Dallas Museum of Art’s exhibition and education programs and the DMA League’s Floral Endowment Fund.

“Honorary Chair Jill Goldberg and I, along with the DMA League, are delighted to have world-renowned floral designer René van Rems as our featured symposium speaker. As a highly regarded ambassador of the floral industry, René has led design shows, workshops, and seminars throughout the US, Canada, Europe and Asia on the styling of fresh-cut flowers.

“Following the symposium attendees will enjoy a seated lunch, a style show by Luxury Fashion Show sponsor, St. John, a silent auction and a raffle, and the inaugural Live Blooming Art Exhibit in the Dallas Museum of Art’s Level 2 European galleries featuring a unique display of floral arrangements, created by local floral designers and inspired by works of art from the Museum’s permanent collection. Art in Bloom patrons will be the first to preview the show, with the exhibition remaining on view for DMA visitors through Wednesday, March 29.

“Sponsorships begin at $2,500 and individual tickets are $250.  For more information, please contact the DMA’s Office of Special Events at 214-922-1249, or visit the Art In Bloom webpage. I hope to see you on March 27 in the new year!”

-By Sarah Jo Hardin, 2017 Art In Bloom chair

* Photo provided by Dallas Museum of Art League

2017 Art Ball Reveal Guests Happily Settled Into Cathy Kincaid Hudson’s So Comfy Cottage

Lee Hobson

Lee Hobson

Ann Hobson (File photo)

Ann Hobson (File photo)

Unlike last year’s Art Ball announcement party at Lisa Blue Baron’s sprawling estate, 2017 Art Ball Co-Chairs Ann and Lee Hobson opted for small and special on Thursday, October 27, to reveal plans for the Dallas Museum of Art black-tie fundraiser. And they knew just the person to provide it — interior designer Cathy Kincaid Hudson’s home-sweetest-home.

Blending the charm of a European cottage with comfy chairs that seemed to beg for settling into the art on the walls, it was the type of bungalow that any movie screenwriter envisions as perfection.

Jeff Byron, Cathy Kincaid Hudson and Kevin Hurst

Jeff Byron, Cathy Kincaid Hudson and Kevin Hurst

Ah, but the adorable digs had way so much more. Just behind the fenced backyard was the pool and the marvelous guest house.

When Cathy was asked about her home, she told how she had only been there a couple of years. Her previous residence on Mockingbird had been lost to a fire.

David and Ann Sutherland

David and Ann Sutherland

But now she was nicely settled in with her pooches, cats and chickens.  

Only problem of the night was trying to squeeze through the crowd of guests like Brooke Hortenstine, Jeff Byron, Kevin Hurst and last year’s Art Co-Chairs Ann and David Sutherland.

As for the announcement, the date is Saturday, April 22, when Ann and Lee will turn the DMA into “All That Glitters” a la “Flowers in a Case With Two Doves.” Think romantic at the DMA. 

And start saving those pennies, because the live auction is going to be curated by Merry Vose and Rajan Patel, so it’s bound to be a beaut.

Tickets and sponsorships are available now. Love the levels — Versailles, Vaux-Le-Vicomte, Saint-Germain, Bagatelle, Fontainebleau, Saint-Cloud and Table Du Maire et/Ou Directeur.

Vive la France et DMA!

2017 Art In Bloom Chair Sarah Jo Hardin Reveals Plans For Dallas Museum Of Art March Fundraiser

Plans for the 2017 Art in Bloom fundraiser for the Dallas Museum of Art were unveiled at Highland Park Village’s St. John back on Wednesday, October 19, completed with champagne. Here’s a report from the field:

The Dallas Museum of Art League unveiled details for “Art in Bloom 2017:  Seasons of Love,’ at a recent cocktail reception held at St. John in Highland Park Village on Wednesday, October 19 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Mark and Sarah Jo Hardin

Mark and Sarah Jo Hardin*

Art in Bloom Chair Sarah Jo Hardin and Honorary Chair Jill Goldberg welcomed 35 host committee members in celebration of the upcoming annual floral symposium and luncheon set for Monday, March 27. Proceeds from the event support the DMA’s exhibition and education programs and the DMA League’s Floral Endowment Fund.

Jill Goldberg and Linda Ivy*

Jill Goldberg and Linda Ivy*

Attendees enjoyed champagne and canapés as they shopped St. John’s fall collection.  Mrs. Hardin gathered the crowd mid-way through the evening to share exciting details about Art in Bloom 2017, which will feature world-renowned Dutch-born floral designer and educator René van Rems as the symposium speaker. The venue for the announcement party was no coincidence as she also unveiled that St. John will be the 2017 Luxury Fashion sponsor. 

Additionally, the 2017 event will include an inaugural Live Blooming Art Exhibit in the Dallas Museum of Art’s Level 2 European galleries featuring a unique display of floral arrangements, created by local floral designers and inspired by works of art from the Museum’s permanent collection. Art in Bloom patrons will be the first to preview the show, with the exhibition remaining on view for DMA visitors through Wednesday, March 29.

Ms. Hardin extended her gratitude for the host of the evening, St. John, as well as all sponsors to date, host committee members in attendance and volunteers. Honorary chairman Jill Goldberg followed to add her thanks, especially to Ms. Hardin for her time and commitment as event chairman.

As the evening came to an end, the winner of a $250 St. John gift card was announced…. Emily Maduro!

Kay Weeks and Dyann Skelton*

Kay Weeks and Dyann Skelton*

In attendance at the Art in Bloom 2017 kickoff party were Mark Hardin, Jamie Hermosillo, Linda Ivy, Stacey McCord, Diane Byrd, Emily Maduro, Nancy Cates, Kay Weeks, Venise Stuart, Dyann Skelton, Dixie Marshall, Ilene Greene, Shannon Callewart, Jeanette Huff and Valerie Jarvie.

Sue Ringle, Therese Rourk  and Dixie Marshall*

Sue Ringle, Therese Rourk and Dixie Marshall*

“Art in Bloom 2017:  Seasons of Love” will include a reception and symposium with René van Rems followed by a seated lunch, style show by St. John, silent auction, the inaugural Live Blooming Art Exhibit and book signing by Mr. van Rems. Sponsorships begin at $2,500, individual tickets are $250, and are on sale now. For more information, contact Edwina Gonzalez at the DMA’s Office of Special Events at 214.922.1800, or visit the Art In Bloom webpage at www. dma.org/support-fundraising-events/art-bloom.

* Photo credit: Tamytha Cameron Smith

With Pumpkins And Lessons From Mom, Ashlee Kleinert Provided Theta’s Heart To Heart Luncheon Guests With Food For Thought

In the world of North Texas fundraising, experts worried their brows about the days between Wednesday, October 26 and Saturday, October 29. It was going to be a slam-bang period and it started with those kite flying Dallas Kappa Alpha Theta alumnae at Brook Hollow.

Becky Bright

Becky Bright

Mary Mencke and Kristi Hoyl

Mary Mencke and Kristi Hoyl

Robin Bagwell and Sarah Rathjen

Robin Bagwell and Sarah Rathjen

Beth Thoele

Beth Thoele

The ladies including Becky Bright, Mary Mencke, Kathy Vassallo, Susan Gordon, Sarah Rathjen, Beth Thoele, Robin Bagwell and Kristi Hoyl discovered that in addition to lunching on Brook Hollow’s fav pecan crusted chicken, they were also going to have an art class courtesy of keynote speaker/Theta Ashlee Kleinert.

Kathy Vassallo, Susan Gordon and Ashlee Kleinert

Kathy Vassallo, Susan Gordon and Ashlee Kleinert

Muffin Lemak and DeeDee Lee

Muffin Lemak and DeeDee Lee

Carol Goglia and Jane Pierce

Carol Goglia and Jane Pierce

Arriving with a tote filled with canvases, Ashlee was one of the late arrivals. Earlier DeeDee Lee explained why her recent skin cancer surgery on her wrist had prevented her from wearing her signature charm bracelet. She also revealed that she was celebrating her 31st wedding anniversary that day with husband Jim LeeMuffin Lemak’s eyes looked bright and clear after a “stint” with shines in the eye. But the luncheon wasn’t for fashion notes and catching up… And the fundraiser wasn’t limited to Thetas. Kappa Kappa Gamma alumna Carol Goglia tagged along with her Theta mom Jane Pierce.

Luncheon Chair Anne Besser and Theta Alumnae President Maury Cunningham had crafted their program perfectly blending KAT’s beneficiary Dallas CASA with the day’s program.

Anne Besser and Maury Cunningham

Anne Besser and Maury Cunningham

Kathleen LaValle

Kathleen LaValle

After Dallas CASA’s Kathleen LaValle told of the need for funds and volunteers and thanked the sorority for its support, Ashlee displayed a couple of her canvases featuring paintings of pumpkins on easels on stage. She then instructed guests that thanks to sheets of paper and markers, they were to draw pumpkins. She also added that the markers would find after life at Dallas CASA.

As the guests created pumpkins, Ashlee told a story from years ago when she was a young mother living in Tulsa with husband Chris Kleinert. Being a first-time mom, she was in need of sleep, pampering and having her mother take over the infant for a break.

Nancy Ann Hunt

Nancy Ann Hunt

Barbara Starz Nathan

Barbara Starz Nathan

Upon returning to Dallas for R&R, she woke up to find her mom (Nancy Ann Hunt) gone for a meeting. But while Ashlee missed out on the pampering, she soon learned about “The Art of Giving.” It seems that Nancy Ann had left her tired daughter and granddaughter for a meeting at the Austin Street Shelter, where she learned a tidbit.

Upon returning home, Nancy Ann told Ashlee to get in the car, so they could buy headsets. Hmm. This development raised some eyebrows in the Brook Hollow ballroom. Strange POA.

But Ashlee explained that Nancy Ann had learning in the meeting that many of the Austin Street clients suffered from schizophrenia and heard voices. Experts had found that “hearing voices” could be overshadowed by other noise…like those coming via a headset.

This experience provided Ashlee with an epiphany that introduced Ashlee to giving. Over the years, Ashlee and Chris created Ruthie’s Food Trucks, Executives in Action and spearheaded countless fundraising efforts within North Texas.

She then told how one act of giving can spread and gave an example of the Akola Project that she’s heading up. It started with Brittany Underwood’s small step years ago when she was a SMU student and went to Uganda. There she saw the poor conditions and organized women to make jewelry. It was so successful that she arranged to have 100 women in need to also join the Akola effort creating jewelry. This grassroots efforts came to the attention of Neiman Marcus, who included the line in the specialty store’s merchandise. Because of Brittany’s “small step,” women have been employed, schools have been improve and healthier conditions have been provided for those in Uganda.

After Ashlee concluded her talk, guests displayed their masterpieces and Luncheon Chair Anne took on the role of live auctioneer.

Seems Ashlee had offered the Ruthie’s food truck to be put up for bid for fundraising. The package included the truck providing meals for 50 people. The value was $1,000. Goodness! Maybe Anne should go into the auction business. Within a matter of a couple of minutes, she had the bidding up to $1,500. With a nod from the Ashlee and her team, Anne was able to offer the package twice for $1,600 each.

Jazz Babies Will Rouge Their Knees When Dallas Museum Of Art Becomes A Speakeasy To Celebrate The Art Of The Cocktail

Gee, whiz! That first weekend in February is already starting to look busier than a bootlegger during Prohibition. Just announced was Mary Parker’s receiving the Sandi Haddock Impact Award at the Dallas Go Red for Women Luncheon on Friday, February 3, and then there’s the Super Bowl down in Houston on Sunday, February 5.

Martini glass, c. 2001 by Valeri Timofeev*

Martini glass, c. 2001 by Valeri Timofeev*

Wedged between Friday and Sunday, the Dallas Museum of Art will become a “Speakeasy” on Saturday, February 4, to celebrate the “Shaken, Stirred, Styled: The Art of the Cocktail” exhibition presently underway at the DMA.

Sure, the showing of cocktail ware from the late 19th century kicked off Saturday, November 12, but if you wait until February 4, you’ll be able to wear that snazzy, jazzy roaring 20’s attire for Sea of Shoes blogger Jane Aldridge to judge for prizes.

As for the fun, the Hamon Atrium will be the spot for craft cocktails with “delicious nibbles,” music by the Singapore Slingers, dance tutorials by The Rhythm Room professionals, gaming tables and a photo booth.

For the highrollers, the Focus One Gallery will be transformed into the VIP Hideaway with an open bar, premier seating, a complimentary ROXOR Gin Garden, more yummies, private gaming tables, “jazz-age hits with a twist, dedicated dance instructors and more.”

Entry tix for cool cats and kittens to the Speakeasy plus two drink tickets are going for $50 for DMA members and $65 for non-members. Big daddies and fabulous flappers will be able to get into the VIP Hideaway and the Speakeasy for $90 for DMA members and $100 for the non-members.

BTW, to make parking for the night simple, it will be self-parking on a first-come, first-self-parked basis.

So, practice the spit curls and pull out your spats because the 20’s are going to be the bee’s knees.

* Photo provide by Dallas Museum of Art

Interactive Artist/Activist Candy Chang Blended Art And Healing For Dallas Women’s Foundation’s 31st Luncheon

To compare last year’s Dallas Women’s Foundation’s 30th Annual Luncheon to this year’s was like comparing a trophy wife to a first wife.

Sure, the 2016 version had Desperate Housewife Eva Longoria at the podium, an A+ meet-and-greet structure, life was good and the economy was marching along. But this year’s Annual Luncheon on Friday, October 21, at the Hilton Anatole had a different set of challenges. The economy was antsy; nerves were on edge perhaps due to the political bickering; and frills of the past were toned down to satisfy the need to meet the bottom line.

Dallas Women’s Foundation President/CEO Ros Dawson admitted that they had considered a six-figure type when petite urban artist/activist Candy Chang appeared at a conference that Ros attended. With the July 7th shooting in Dallas and the luncheon Co-Chairs/art champions Joyce Goss and Selwyn Rayzor at the helm, Ros just knew they had a perfect match — their keynote speaker blending art and advocacy together … and an on-target budget.

Joyce Goss, Candy Change, Selwyn Rayzor, Ellenore Baker and Ros Dawson

Joyce Goss, Candy Change, Selwyn Rayzor, Ellenore Baker and Ros Dawson

That tightening of the budget was paramount since establishing the Unlocking Leadership Campaign goal of $50M. It was a daunting challenge to raise that type of money.  Still, thanks to sponsors like U.S. Trust, the DWF mission of investing in women and girls and empowering women’s philanthropy to build a better world forged ahead.

But the day started off with the meet-and-greet in the Anatole’s Wedgwood Room. It had all the signs of being a repeat of last year’s flawless grip-and-grin. There was a cordoned-off area for guests to have their photos taken with Candy. There were cards to be provided to guests as they arrived to hand over when their photo opp took place. There was even the metal ring on which the cards were to be placed to help identify who was in each photo. The only thing missing was the (wo)manpower to make things happen.

Candy Chang and Regina Montoya

Candy Chang and Regina Montoya

Unlike last year’s photo opp, with one person to receive the card at the line up and another to take a handbag to the exit area, there was just one person who stayed at the exit. Some guests made it to the cordoned-off area with cards filled out, but most showed up at the exit with no card. Evidently, the cards were only sporadically being handed out and some folks didn’t realize there was a meet-and-greet taking place. There were times when Candy just stood like the last gal picked at a boy-ask-girl dance. But Candy was a good sport and stayed with a smile on her lips and an artistic tattoo on her right arm.

Just outside the Chantilly Ballroom, the lobby was highlighted by large panels headlined with “A better world is …”  The panels would be put to full use after the luncheon.

In the Chantilly Ballroom, organizers admitted that the luncheon headcount was down from 2015’s 1,800—if you call 1,300 down. But the money count was ahead of plan.

Kaleta Doolin

Kaleta Doolin

Joyce and Selwyn welcomed the group including Dallas Women’s Foundation Board Chair Ellenore Baker, Kay Bailey Hutchison, Paige Flink, Nancy Ann Hunt, Rex Thompson, Robin Bagwell, Wendy Messmann, Regina Montoya and 2017 Dallas Women’s Foundation Luncheon Chair Lisa Singleton, telling them the presentation by Candy would offer hope and healing. They told of the cards at the tables that could be filled out and placed on the lobby’s panels following Candy’s talk. They added that even before the doors of the ballroom were opened, more than a million dollars had been brought in.

After they recognized Honorary Chair/artist Kaleta Doolin, a powerful video was shown about the challenges facing a single mother in need of help.

p1210391Ashlee and Chris Kleinert, Paula and Ron Parker and Trea Yip were on stage to stir up the Foundation’s fundraising campaign. Over $30,793,000 had been raised, but they wanted to match the 31st anniversary by hitting the $31M mark. If folks texted to #betterworld, they could make a donation to meet the goal. Immediately cellphones were pulled out on stage and in the audience to provide the funds.

Trea Yip and Ashlee Kleinert

Trea Yip and Ashlee Kleinert

On the screen, the names of donors like Clay Jenkins and Sandra Brown were shown. And while texting may still be like hieroglyphics to some, this one caused consternation even among the savvy types. There seemed to be problem that became a topic during the luncheon.

No problem. Soon Mother Ros was on stage explaining the hiccup. It seems that some folks had put a space between “better” and “world” and heaven knows where the money was going. But not to worry. The DWF braintrust had already taken care of the misdirected funds. With a sigh of relief, the cellphones were out again and successful donations were made. Whew!

Ros Dawson

Ros Dawson

Following a film, Ros invited people to keep talking as she spoke. And that is exactly what they did. Between the chatter and the clatter of the forks on plates, the folks especially in the back of the room missed her telling of the $31K anonymous donation that had just been made in honor of the 31st anniversary, helping the texting amount to $72K at that moment. They also could hardly hear Ros describing the great need to “harness the heart of this community to address the deep divide of race, class and gender.” It was for this need to bring people together that the decision had been made to bypass a big-name celeb and go for a peaceful and thoughtful activist like Candy Chang as the keynote speaker.

As Candy took the stage, the noise level in the room had decreased thanks to the winding down of the meal. With the help of the massive screens around the room, Candy told of her journey as a community activist and artist in New Orleans and the turning point that led her to create an international movement as well as become a TED Senior Speaker. It was the death of “Joan,” who had been so influential throughout Candy’s life. Her death had been sudden and unexpected. Candy went through a period of grief and depression.  She discovered an abandoned house in her neighborhood and decided to use it as a canvas. Painting one of its walls black like a chalkboard, she wrote on it, “Before I die, I want to…” Pretty soon the wall was filled with all types of comments reflecting on the authors’ lives. The wall allowed a coming together of feelings, dreams and concerns among the people. This one wall of words caught on like wildfire throughout the world. Today there are more than 2,000 “Before I die…” walls internationally. Each wall is unique to its own community.

Speaking of her own success, she admitted that she owed it “to the generosity of others who stepped in and caught me at that critical moment when I questioned whether I had the capacity or the confidence to try something new.”

She was especially moved by the day’s program, and hoped that the audience would pay it forward in providing support and empowerment for girls and women on their journeys.

Before concluding her talk, she added that all people have mental health issues like sorrow, anxiety, stress, etc.: “These feelings easily escalate to more intense conflicts like addiction or depression or self-destruction.”  As a result, she created an interactive exhibit in which writers anonymously confessed their feelings. One such confession read: “I’m afraid I’ll die alone.”

This sense of coming together to heal led her to her latest project — Atlas of Tomorrow in Philadelphia.

It is a huge interactive mural with a 6-foot dial which people are invited to spin to possibly resolve challenges or issues facing them. The number on which the spinner stops leads them to one of 64 stories taken from I Ching, one of the world’s oldest books of wisdom. The hope is to provide “a place to pause and try and make sense of our lives together,” according to Philadelphia Mural Arts Program Executive Director Jane Golden.  

But despite the huge project in Philadelphia and the worldly influence, Candy’s message was felt on a smaller plain. As guests left the ballroom, they let it be known that they had gotten Candy’s message by filling the panels in the lobby completing the line, “A better world is…” One read, “A better world is … because of the Dallas Women’s Foundation.”  Said others: ” … full of compassion,” ” … kind,” ” … possible.”  Those panels were not just for show. Their future lay at being positioned throughout the city including at NorthPark Center, Southwest Center Mall, The Stewpot Talent Show at Encore Park and The Stewpot.  

BTW, thanks to texting and generosity, the Foundation hit its $31M mark. Now, only $19M to go!