“Farewell Founder’s Luncheon” Celebrates Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Supporters And Launches The Ann Williams Legacy Society

Back in 1996 the Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Founder’s Luncheon was the brainchild of DBDT Founder Ann Williams to raise money and to honor “civic and business leaders of Dallas who have impacted Dallas Black Dance Theatre and the Dallas arts community.” Over the years, dozens and dozens of people and organizations like The Meadows Foundation, Liz Minyard, Juanita Brown, former first lady Laura Bush, Isabell Cottrell, Target, Nancy Hamon, Helen Giddings, Ruth Altshuler, JC Penney, Annette Strauss and Mary Suhm were honored.

Since Ann’s announced retirement in 2014, changes started taking place. In addition to the departure of two artistic directors, it was decided that funding for the organization should go in a different direction. Instead of the luncheon event going quietly into the night, it was decided to hold a send-off event — “Farewell Founder’s Luncheon” — at which time the new fundraising program would be revealed.

While some might have thought the luncheon at the Hilton Anatole on Wednesday, January 17, would be a boo-hoo occasion, it was full of cheers for Ann and her organization that is “the oldest, continuously operating professional dance company in Dallas.”

Michelle Thomas

The day kicked off with a VIP Reception in half of the Grand Ballroom for folks like Michelle Thomas, DBDT Executive Director Zenetta Drew, DBDT Executive Board Member Paulette Turner, past honoree Charley Pride and his wife Rozene Pride  and the day’s honorees Andy McCarthy, Herdercine Nash and Linda Todd. Emcee Clarice Tinsley was juggling duties — reviewing script and accommodating requests for photos with Ann. Due to the day’s chill, guests were checking their coats at the door.

Speaking of coats, those heading to the Imperial Ballroom upstairs for the luncheon were finding the hallway brisk to say the least. It made some of the 650 guests opt to pass up the upstairs coat check.

At the back of the room, tables were set up for selling the DBDT’s 40th anniversary books. At the front of the room was a stage large enough for a performance. Down the center of the room was a 12-foot wide aisle with the head table set for 16 next to the stage.

Devrae Jefferson, Lindzay Duplessis, Kayleigh Eidson, Imani English and Chad Vaught

At 11:50 the VIP Reception was breaking up and the ballroom was starting to fill. Standing near the room’s entrance were five of the Dallas Black Dance Theatre Encore members (Devrae Jefferson, Lindzay Duplessis, Kayleigh Eidson, Imani English and Chad Vaught). When asked if they would be performing at the luncheon, they smiled and said, “No.”

Doug Curtis and Ann Williams

Clarice Tinsley and Lucy Billingsley

Zenetta Drew and Gilbert Gerst

Lelious Johnson

Right on schedule the headtable guests including Ann, Clarice, Zenetta, General Co-Chairs the Rev. Lelious Johnson and Kimberley Runnels, Honorary Co-Chairs Lucy Billingsley and Doug Curtis, DBDT Board Chair Gilbert Gest and the day’s honorees and their spouses Samara Kline, Joseph Nash and Frederick Todd were introduced as they entered the ballroom and took their places at the table.

Kicking things off DBDT Board of Directors Rev. Claude O. Maples told everyone to stand including Mary McDermott Cook, Regina Montoya, Marnie Wildenthal and Patricia Meadows. There was a slight hesitation as guests looked around a bit bewildered, but all complied. Then he instructed all to point to Ann saying, “Ann, you go, girl.” With smiles and laughter, the room full of guests joined in to the delight of Ann.

Clarice revealed that the Chilhuly-styled sculptures serving as centerpieces were available for purchase at $200 a pieces.

Dallas Black Dance Academy’s Allegro Performing Ensemble

Following lunch, the Dallas Black Dance Academy’s Allegro Performing Ensemble arrived on the stage and performed “Mandiba.”

Ann Williams and Linda Todd

Ann Williams and Herdercine Nash

Ann Williams and Andy McCarthy

Samara Kline and Kimberly Runnels

It was then time for the final presentation of the Founder’s Awards by Ann to Andy, Linda and Hercerdine followed by Zenetta’s revealing the creation of the Ann Williams Legacy Society that would be supported by benefactors listing DBDT in their will, trust, retirement plan or life insurance policy. Already on board as Charter Members were Norma and Don Stone, who in 2016 added DBDT to their will. 

Herman Houston III

To conclude the luncheon on just the right note, DBDT Encore member Herman Houston III took the stage dancing to Sam Cooke‘s “A Change Is Gonna Come.”

At the conclusion of his performance, Ann Williams received a standing ovation for her vision and dedication.

For more photos of the event, check out MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Farewell Founder’s Luncheon

Ann Williams and Andy McCarthy

Ann Williams and Linda Todd

Ann Williams and Herdercine Nash

Samara Kline and Kimberly Runnels

The “Farewell Founder’s Luncheon” on Wednesday, January 17, at the Hilton Anatole may have closed the chapter for one part of the Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s fundraising, but it also introduced the next chapter — The Ann Williams Legacy Society.

Dallas Black Dance Academys Allegro Performing Ensemble

And, of course, the event couldn’t just be a sit-down award ceremony. In addition to presenting the final Founder’s Luncheon awards to Andy McCarthy, Herdercine Nash and Linda Todd, there were also performances by the Dallas Black Dance Academy’s Allegro Performing Ensemble and DBDT Encore member Herman Houston III.

Herman Houston III

While the post is being prepared, check out the guests and dancers at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

Dallas Children’s Theater Debuted Its Assistive Listening Devices Friday Thanks To A Crystal Charity Ball Grant

If the Crystal Charity Ball members have been MIA lately, it’s because they’re in the final days of selecting the 2018 beneficiaries.

Assistive Listening Device*

And to prove that the CCB’s fundings do pay off for Dallas County children, the Dallas Children’s Theater is a perfect example.

Thanks to a CCB grant provided in 2015 for sensory-friendly programming, the DCT is now offering Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs) for shows in the Baker Theater.

It will be available for “patrons who would like some amplification of the dialogue, music and additional sound effects of DCT shows.”

Dallas Children’s Theater staff trying out ALD*

According to DCT Associate Artistic Director/Education Director Nancy Schaeffer, “We know that some audience members need help to hear all of the wonderful sounds of a live DCT show. Now they can use the Assistive Listening Devices for any show in the beautiful Baker Theater. No one needs to miss a beat or feel left out.”

Prior to ALDs, the DCT has offered American Sign Language interpreted performances.

The ALDs debuted Friday with the DCT’s first show of the 2018 season, “The Very Hungry Caterpillar Show.”

* Photo provided by Dallas Children's Theater

Nasher Sculpture Center’s 2018 Great Create Artists Revealed

One of the ultimate most favorite family events is the Nasher Sculpture Center’s The Great Create. It not only turns the Center’s lush grounds into a colorful playground with food and music for kids, it also has pop-up workshops with some of the area’s most outstanding artists.

Great Create (File photo)

This year’s Co-Chairs Macey and Steve Davis, Nicole and Justin Small and Meredith and Scott Wallace have quite a lineup of talent for the Nasher fun(d)raiser. They include Chesley Antoinette, The Color Condition, Ryan Goolsby, Kyle Hobratschk, Shelby David Meier, Nic Nicosia, Tom Sachs, Allison V. Smith and Giovanni Valderas.  

From 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, April 29, the artists will set up along the walkways for kids to try out their handiwork and learn about different forms of art.

The activities are geared for munchkins 12 and under. Oldtimers (13 and older) are able to be Art Ambassadors, who can assist the artists and the wee ones.

The Great Create (File photo)

The Great Create (File photo)

If you don’t have a kiddo, borrow one. It’s as much fun for the adults as the children.

Tickets are available here! Upper level packages include perks like invites to the patron party, “a special family photography opportunity with Allison V. Smith” and VIP Early Admission.

BTW, proceeds from the event go to the Nasher’s youth education programs that “account for more than 36% of the Center’s attendance each year, allowing many students and families to experience the Nasher at no cost.”

Tutu Chic Fashion Show And Luncheon Was Highlighted By Lifting Ballerinas And Bid Paddles For Texas Ballet Theater

Stanley Korshak’s Crawford Brock had better watch his back. Ah, but more about that later.

Tricia Besing

Betsy Crousen

Mary Potter

Kameron Westcott and Katy Bock

Barbara Daseke

With November temperatures proving warmer than usual, the Tutu Chi Fashion Show and Luncheon on Tuesday, November 28, at the Winspear was lacking furs and boots. Rather the gals like Lee Bailey, Doris Jacobs, Betsy Crousen, Katy Bock, Kameron Westcott, Simona Beal, Lisa Cooley, Tracy Lange with daughter Olivia Lange, Barbara Daseke, Mary Potter, Lynn McBee, Tricia Besing, Linda Ivy, Tucker Enthoven with her mom Julie Ford wore those in between season attire. And while the guests sipped white wine and champagne and towered in stilettos, the Texas Ballet Theater ballerinas were backstage in their ballet slippers.

But soon the chimes call the crowd to the Shannon and Ted Skokos Stage for the fashion show featuring ballerinas in Naeem Khan fashions in between performance by the TBT dancers. Alas, the designer couldn’t make it this year, but his clothes represented him to a T.

Before the program got underway, TBT Executive Director Vanessa Logan and Crawford welcomed the filled-to-the-brim crowd. It was at this point that Crawford may have tweaked some. He told how traditional models don’t eat and tend to look unhappy because they’re hungry. On the other hand, he suggested that this occasion was one of his favorites because the models looked so healthy and they do eat.

On the latter, Crawford was right on target. As the program got underway with TBT Artistic Director Ben Stevenson, Presenting Sponsor Nancy Carlson, Co-Chairs Marybeth Conlon and Heather LeClair, Robyn Conlon with daughter-in-law Megan Conlon front rowing it, the dancers’ leaps and lifts showed muscles that any athlete would admire.

Texas Ballet Theater dancers

Texas Ballet Theater dancers

Texas Ballet Theater dancer

Texas Ballet Theater dancer

Following the presentation, Vanessa and Crawford returned to the stage where the request for funds was made. Crawford admitted that he had a personal appreciation for the art — his mother had been a dancer.

Stepping forward to address the group were two of dancers surrounded by the rest of the troupe. Michelle Taylor told how the dancers went through their slippers, boots and toe shoes thanks to rehearsals and performances. And then there were costs of costumes, wigs and other needs for their “Swan Lake,” “Nutcracker” and other ballets.

With mics from the left: Michelle Taylor and Robin Bangert

Robin Bangert explained how in recent years, physical therapy availability had been a game changer for pulled muscles.

All of these cost money. So, while guests pulled out checkbooks to fill donation envelopes, Crawford auctioned off “A Year Of Experiences (attending Naeem’s presentation at the September New York Fashion Week, a lunch for the winner with friends at Stanley Korshak along with a $1,000 gift certificate, a $500 gift certificate to Bullion, four tickets to “Swan Lake” in June at the Winspear and a one-night stage at the Hotel Crescent Court). But before Crawford could even request an opening bid of $2,500, hand was up. Then the hands started raising throughout the audience resulting in a winning big of $12,000.

MySweetCharity Photo Gallery Alert: Tutu Chic Fashion Show And Luncheon

With mics from the left: Michelle Taylor and Robin Bangert

Perhaps New York-based designer Naeem Khan envisions graceful ballerinas when he creates his fashions. Perhaps not. Regardless, the Texas Ballet Theater dancers and Naeem’s clothes proved to be the perfect combination for the dancing and fashion presentation at the Tutu Chic Fashion Show and Luncheon on Tuesday, November 28, at the Winspear.

And to top off the day’s presentation on the Shannon and Ted Skokos stage, the live auction was a package of goodies that included everything from Naeem’s NYC Fashion Show Week to all types of activities and places in Dallas. Even Stanley Korshak headman Crawford Brock was amazed at how quickly the bidding started.

Texas Ballet Theater dancers

Texas Ballet Theater dancers

While the post is being prepared, check out the looks, the lifts and ladies at MySweetCharity Photo Gallery.

JUST IN: Margaret McDermott And Margot Perot Join Nancy Nasher As Vice Chairs Of Dallas Symphony Association Board Of Governors

With the Dallas Symphony Orchestra undergoing some major transitions this year with the arrival of new President/CEO Kim Noltemy, the departure of Music Director Jaap van Zweden and the search for Jaap’s replacement, the Dallas Symphony Association Board of Governors decided to add some heavyweights to its leadership.

Margaret McDermott (File photo)

Margot Perot (File photo)

Nancy Nasher (File photo)

It was just announced that art-loving philanthropists Margaret McDermott and Margot Perot will join fellow philanthropist/art lover Nancy Nasher as vice-chairs of the DSA.

According to DSO Board Chair Sanjiv Yajnik, “Mrs. McDermott and Mrs. Perot are transformative leaders in Dallas with decades of experience in supporting the Dallas Symphony. I am proud and humbled that they accepted my invitation to join the board. Their passion for artistic excellence and commitment to raising the profile of the DSO around the world is inspiring. With their and Ms. Nasher’s support, we look forward to establishing the DSO as one of the world’s great cultural institutions.”

Business Council For The Art’s 2017 Obelisk Awards Luncheon Was A Salute To The Arts And Business And A Swan Song For Two

Some of the 2017 Obelisk Awardees were wondering why the pre-luncheon VIP reception at the Belo on Wednesday, November 15, was starting at 10 a.m. After all, the luncheon wasn’t scheduled to start until noon. Still there were group photos to be taken and individual ones with VIP types like Business Council for the Arts Chair Nancy Nasher and mic tests. But this group was well versed into production and found themselves done with all the preparations within a half hour.

Luckily, there were plenty of things to catch up about and check out like the arrangement of the awards that were strategically positioned in front of the ballroom. The beautiful pieces of glass were the artwork by Dallas artisan Jim Bowman. This collection would be Jim’s swan song, since he and his wife Mary Lynn Devereux-Bowman were moving to North Carolina.

2017 Obelisk Awards by Jim Bowman

And speaking of swan songs, little did anyone suspect that this would be one of the awardee’s farewell appearances. But more about that later.

David Haemisegger, Nancy Nasher and Larry Glasgow

Carolyn Brown

James Faust

Niki Anthony

Across the room, the late art scribe Patsy Swank’s son, Sam Swank played his guitar as around 500 guests like  David Haemisegger, Business Council for the Arts Larry Glasgow, NorthPark crew (Billy Hines and Lona Crabb), Neiman’s Kevin Hurst, Nasher Sculpture Center’s Jeremy Strick, Jo Staffelbach Heinz and Andre Staffelbach, James Faust, Dotti Reeder, Carolyn Brown, Patricia Meadows and Dr. Richard Sachson waited for the ballroom doors to open.

At one point the entry of the guests came to a standstill as one Mercedes driver forgot something in her care and searched and searched for it with cars coming to a standstill in the Belo circular drive.

At 11:41 a.m. the doors opened and the room filled, but it took a couple of call-to-chairs by a voice over the PA. Even after taking their places, the crowd was in a talkative mood. Due to the chatter in the room, many didn’t realized that art-loving/real estate kingpin Craig Hall was appearing in a video on the screens at the front of the room. He was introducing the backstory of Jim’s creating the awards. Too bad because the process was both fascinating and a salute to the artist.

Following the videos, Business Council for the Arts Board Chair Larry Glasgow addressed the group and immediately the talk stopped. Perhaps if he had introduced the videos, more folks would have learned about the work that went into the awards that were underwritten by Craig.  

Steven Roth and Thai-Lan Tran

Luncheon Co-Chairs Dr. Thai-Lan Tran and Steven Roth spoked how the arts contribute to the well-being of people and that Keynote Speaker Karen Brooks Hopkins would be addressing the group in a few minutes.

For the next ten minutes, guests were put to the test of Etiquette 101. At many tables, some guests were served their lunches, while others didn’t. As forks stayed in place waiting for the rest of the table to be served, the chicken Provencal with asparagus and crispy potatoes cooled. A floor managed walked the room appearing to be satisfied with the progress, while more than one guest tried to grabbed the attention of a passing server. Eventually, plates made their way to the empty spots and no one starved.

At 12:15, Karen posed the question if the arts and business can help and provide real service? She believed the answer was a definite, “Yes.” Highlights of her talk included

  • Art is the only thing that endures over the years.
  • Too often art is dismissed as frivolous.
  • The arts only receive 5% of corporate philanthropy.
  • Inclusion of arts in low income neighborhoods results in positive ways.
  • The arts can be a powerful force for change.
  • Businesses must be incorporated in supporting the arts to get the job done.

In emphasizing the need for the need to appreciate corporate support, she recalled that during the 2008 recession, she was involved in a gala at which the head of the sponsoring bank was called to the stage and he was boo-ed. “It would be the long time before the bank would sign up again. I learned a hard lesson that night.”

Ryan Anthony

Finishing her talk at 12:28, Karen said that business should be creative in giving.

Next up was Nancy, who like a general taking command said, “We’re going to keep on schedule.” That said, she didn’t mince words and introduce Dallas Symphony Orchestra Lead Trumpet Ryan Anthony, who played three tunes making it seem so effortless. He finished up with “You’ll Never Walk Alone” from “Carousel.”

At 12:39 North Texas Public Broadcasting President/CEO Mary Anne Alhadeff took her place at the podium on the left side of the stage to announce the recipients including

From the left: (front row) : Keith Cerny, Nancy Carlson, Alexa Spears, Gail Sachson, Bill DiGaetano and Eddie Reyes; (back row) : Adam Conway, Kevin Hurst, Julius Pickenpack, Kathy Litinas, Javier Martinez and Jacques Marquis

  • The Arts Partnership Award
    • Large Business — Target
    • Medium Business — Alamo Drafthouse Cinema
    • Small Business — Angelika Film Center
  • The New Initiatives Award
    • Large Business — Corgan
    • Medium Business — West Village
    • Small Business — C.C. Communications
  • The Distinguished Cultural Organization Award — The Cliburn
  • The Business Champion for the Arts Award — Nancy Carlson
  • The Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader Award — Keith Cerny
  • The Arts Education Award — Neiman Marcus Group
  • The Lifetime Achievement Award — Ask Me About Art/Gail Sachson
  • The Community Champion Award — Kathy Litinas

All gave touching and revealing acceptance speeches. They ranged from Nancy Carlson’s “It’s my privilege to support the arts” to Gail Sachson’s “Art is good for your eyes and all your other body parts. But it especially good for your heart. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.”

Ironically, the last recipient was The Dallas Opera General Director/CEO Keith Cerny who sounded like he was doing a Reader’s Digest version of the State-Of-The-Opera. In addition to achieving financial stability and gaining international recognition, his proudest achievement was the Linda and Mitch Hart program for women conductors.

Exactly one month later to the day, Keith would announce he was leaving The Dallas Opera to head up the Calgary Opera.

MySweetWishList: AT&T Performing Arts Center

According to AT&T Performing Arts Center Director of Education and Community Engagement Glynis Brault,

“Happy holidays, fellow Dallasites!

Motown the Musical*

“The nonprofit AT&T Performing Arts Center passionately believes that everyone deserves to experience the power and wonder of the arts. Our wish this holiday season is that you’ll join us in our efforts to educate, entertain and inspire audiences from every part of North Texas.

“The Center has a unique program called Community Partners. Working with social service agencies, we provide tickets to individuals and families who face challenging circumstances or have little to no access to the performing arts. Through this highly collaborative solution to the problem of arts access in North Texas, the Center provides approximately 1,500 free tickets each year to a variety of partner organizations. However, as a nonprofit arts foundation which presents shows rather than produces them, the Center must purchase the tickets we use for this program. Currently, Community Partners is supported by the visionary Donna Wilhelm Friendship Fund, Texas Commission on the Arts and individual contributions to our annual fund – from generous supporters like you!

AT&T Performing Arts Center **

“And the outcomes are exciting! Just ask Kamica King, a music therapist at The Bridge, a Community Partners agency which serves the homeless community. Last year she brought a group to see Grammy Award-winning blues musician Keb’ Mo’.

“’I wanted to say a huge thank you for the opportunity to bring Bridge guests to see Keb’ Mo’,’ said Ms. King, who turned the concert into a classroom and concert experience! ‘The cohort enjoyed learning about Keb’ Mo’ and his music, loved the show and had really great reflections on the experience as well. This would not have been possible without the generosity of the AT&T Performing Arts Center. You all do tremendous work to make the arts accessible and we are truly thankful. It is an honor to be a Community Partner!’

Winspear Opera House***

“Well, the feeling is mutual! We’re honored to partner with The Bridge. The same goes for all of our Community Partners which include The Family Place, HopeKids North Texas, Jonathan’s Place, Jubilee Park & Community Center, Lumin Education, Nexus Recovery Center Inc., Resource Center, Ronald McDonald House of Dallas, Uplift Education – Peak Preparatory, Vickery Meadow Youth Development Foundation, Wesley-Rankin Community Center and Wilkinson Center.

“Our wish this holiday season? That you’ll help us continue serving all these great partners and the people they serve!

“Likewise, if you represent an agency that you’d like to see involved in Community Partners please let us know.

“Happy Holidays!”

-By Glynis Brault, AT&T Performing Arts Center director of Education and Community Engagement

* Photo credit: Nate Rehlander, courtesy of AT&T Performing Arts Center
** Graphic provided by AT&T Performing Arts Center 
***Photo credit: Carter Rose, courtesy of AT&T Performing Arts Center

JUST IN: The Dallas Opera’s GM/CEO Keith Cerny Resigns To Head Up Calgary Opera

Keith and Jennifer Cerny (File photo)

The Dallas Opera‘s GM/CEO Keith Cerny has just turned in his resignation to take over the position of general director/CEO of Calgary Opera in January.

During his seven-and-a-half years with the Dallas company, Keith presided over five consecutive balanced operating budgets and a host of artistic projects, expansions, and technical innovations.  These include a highly-successful simulcast program; regional, U.S. and world premieres; and innovative community outreach programs.  

According to Dallas Opera Board Chair Holly Mayer, “Keith has every reason to be proud of his legacy. We wish him every success with his new responsibilities as we turn our efforts to maintaining this company’s impressive forward momentum and strengthening the collaborations with other arts organizations that have marked Keith’s tenure here in Dallas.”

Dallas’ loss is Calgary’s gain.

2018 Dallas Black Dance Theatre’s Farewell Founder’s Award Luncheon To Honor Founder Ann Williams As Awardees Andy McCarthy, Herdercine Nash And Linda Todd

Back in 1996 Dallas Black Dance Theatre Founder Ann M. Williams wanted a fundraising event to support the organization’s community outreach and education programs in the area including dance classes, workshop and lecture-demonstration for students. She also wanted to recognize “civic and business leaders of Dallas who have impacted Dallas Black Dance Theatre and the Dallas arts community.” Her supporters came up with the perfect solution — the Annual Founder’s Award Luncheon

Thanks to the support of such sponsors like Presenting Sponsor Chase, the event became the major community fundraiser for the “oldest, continuously operating professional dance company in Dallas,” that was established in 1976.

But the upcoming fundraiser on Wednesday, January 17, at the Hilton Anatole has been renamed the 2018 Farewell Founder’s Award Luncheon. The reason is that it will be the last one. It’s time to launch a new “initiative.”

But the luncheon will be far from a boo-hoo occasion. It will be a celebration highlighting “the legacy and extraordinary service of Ms. Williams, to Dallas and the field of dance,”as well honoring the 2018 awardees Andy McCarthy, Herdercine Nash and Linda Todd

Doug Curtis, Lucy Billingsley and Ann Williams*

Joining Event Co-Chairs Kimberley Runnels and the Rev. Lelious Johnson will be Honorary Co-Chairs Lucy Billingsley and Doug Curtis.

With this finale luncheon just a few weeks away, better lock down your reservations pronto. Plans for the fundraiser’s replacement will be revealed at the meal.

* Photo credit: Derrick Waiters

Grovel Alert: Tutu Chic Fashion Show And Luncheon

Texas Ballet Theater dancers (File photo)

Not all the nonprofits are going quiet between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. Well, of course, there is Crystal Charity Ball on Saturday, December 2. But on Tuesday, November 28, the Tutu Chic Fashion Show And Luncheon at the Winspear will have the champagne bubbling and the dancers doing pas de deux, pirouette and grand jeté in the Naeem Khan designs from Stanley Korshak with the guests on stage for a up-close view. 

Co-Chair Marybeth Conlon and Heather LeClair along with Presenting Sponsor Nancy Carlson have been busy getting guests on board for the Texas Ballet Theater fundraiser.

If you’ve purchased your tickets, congratulations! If you haven’t, you’d better hurry-scurry.

According to Texas Ballet Theater Development Manager Theresa Ireland-Daubs, “We are so close to hitting our goal of 30 tables!”

So, put off the grocery shopping for Thursday’s feasting and make your reservation here.

SOLD-OUT ALERT!: 2017 Obelisk Award Luncheon

Business Council for the Arts Katherine Wagner just sent some good news and some not-so-good news. First, let’s get the not-so-good news over with. If you were waiting until the last minute to get your spot at the Obelisk Award Luncheon, you waited too long and you’re out of luck.

2017 Obelisk Award (File photo)

Now for the good news: The November 15th lunch at Belo Mansion is sold out.  

But you were really hankering to be part of the occasion, you know better than anyone that Katherine could find one more place if the check is written with the right amount. Wink, wink.

Grovel Alert: Obelisk Award Luncheon

Steven Roth and Thai-Ian Tran*

Co-Chairs Thai-Ian Tran and Steve Roth just sent word that the Business Council for the Art’s Obelisk Award Luncheon at the Belo on Wednesday, November 15, is just a couple of tables away from being sold out.

In addition to having Nasher Haemisegger Fellow for the National Center for Arts Research and former Brooklyn Academy of Music President Karen Brooks Hopkins as keynote speaker, this year’s event is honoring the following:

2017 Obelisk Award (File photo)

  • The Arts Partnership Award recognizes businesses that have provided sustained support to an arts/cultural organization for three or more years.
    • Large Business (more than 500 employees locally) — Target nominated by Nasher Sculpture Center.
    • Medium Business (between 50 and 500 employees locally) — Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Richardson nominated by AIR (Arts Incubator of Richardson).
    • Small Business (fewer than 50 employees locally) — Angelika Film Center – Dallas nominated by Video Association of Dallas
  • The New Initiatives Award recognizes businesses for supporting an innovative arts/cultural program created within the past three years.
    • Large Business (more than 500 employees locally) — Corgan nominated by Creative Arts Center
    • Medium Business (between 50-500 employees locally) — West Village nominated by: Dallas Film Society
    • Small Business (fewer than 50 employees locally) — C.C. Communications, LLC nominated by Esta Raza No Se Raja
  • The Distinguished Cultural Organization Award is given to recognize one outstanding nonprofit organization for a project or program that has enhanced the community through partnership with a business. — The Cliburn nominated by The Arts Council of Fort Worth/Neiman Marcus
  • The Business Champion for the Arts Award recognizes long-term leadership and commitment to arts/culture by a business executive (president, CEO, partner). — Nancy Carlson nominated by TACA
  • The Visionary Nonprofit Arts Leader Award recognizes an arts leader who has consistently demonstrated vision, impact, innovation, and successful alignment with business and community partners throughout their tenure. — Keith Cerny nominated by Deutsche Bank Trust Co., NA/ Deutsche Bank Wealth Management.
  • The Arts Education Award recognizes one outstanding business for its support of arts education programs. — Neiman Marcus Group nominated by Big Thought and Dallas Black Dance Theater
  • The Lifetime Achievement Award recognizing lifetime advancement of the arts. — Ask Me About Art/Gail Sachson nominated by Carolyn Brown Photography
  • The Community Champion Award recognizing community arts advancement — Kathy Litinas nominated by Allen Arts Alliance

Remaining tickets are available here.

* Photo provided by Business Council for the Arts