JUST IN: Diane And Hal Brierley Gift A Whopping $5M To The United Way Of Metropolitan Dallas’ Unite Forever Campaign

Hal and Diane Brierley (File photo)

Hal and Diane Brierley (File photo)

Diane and Hal Brierley are probably gonna be clipping grocery store coupons after today. The philanthropic duo, who have supported everything including the arts, healthcare and animals, are $5M lighter in the wallet.

Tomorrow it is going to be announced that the Brierleys have donated $5M to the United Way of Metropolitan DallasUnite Forever Campaign. Yup, that’s right a five followed by six zeroes! In all their years, this gift is the largest donation to a “social service organization” they’ve ever made.

It was one year ago this month that United Way President/CEO Jennifer Sampson and her crew launched the campaign to raise $100M for the United Way Foundation of Metropolitan Dallas “to transform the lives and preserve the futures of North Texas.”

Thanks to the Brierleys’ gift, they’ve raised more than $35M toward the goal.

And leave it to the very smart Brierleys to spread the love. Their “commitment includes a $2M gift to endow their annual $100,000 Tocqueville Society gift.” Diane and Hal have been members of the Society for more than two decades, but this present makes them the “newest members of the Tocqueville Legacy Circle that is made up of Tocqueville donors who have funded their annual gift in perpetuity.”

The remaining $3M-gift “is a bequest earmarked in part to support United Way’s Social Innovation Fund.”

According to Jennifer, “The Brierleys have been a driving force behind many important endeavors in the city of Dallas. Their longtime involvement and service at United Way have provided strategic direction, sage wisdom, and vast resources. We are grateful to Diane and Hal for this generous gift, sure to unite this community in creating secure futures for generations to come.”

If you have some time, you might want to read the release that touches on just a smattering of all the contributions in which Diane and Hal have been involved. They may not have been born in Dallas, but Dallas is grateful they found their way here. But be forewarned: you’re gonna be worn out just reading all they do.

BTW, don’t feel too sorry for Diane and Hal. They’re going to be treated to a “free” lunch at Tuesday’s United Way’s “Second Tuesday” Tocqueville Society luncheon. [Read more…]

Galleria Dallas’ “Decadence: Fashions Of The 1920’s” Opens Its Run Through February 28 To Fashion Followers’ Delight

It was during the 1920’s just before The Great Depression hit that fashion soared with flappers’ raising their hemlines, rouging their knees and framing their faces with spit curls. To the shock of their parents, these styles were very naughty. To showcase that revolutionary era of fashion, the Galleria Dallas has created “Decadence: Fashions from the 1920’s” that will be on exhibition through Sunday, February 28, on the ground level across from Tiffany & Co. To kick things off, a preview party was held on Friday, January 22, with lovers-of-the-cloth in attendance like Rhonda Sargent Chambers, Naila Malik, Kasey Bell, Natalie Westbrook, Venny Etienne, Ashtin Roberston, Charmaine Marshall, Jan Strimple, Ekaterina Kouznetsova, Michael Dylan, Nicholas Moore and Chuck Steelman. Here’s a report from the field:

Over 300 fans of vintage fashion came together at Galleria Dallas to celebrate the grand opening of Decadence: Fashions from the 1920’s. The exhibition, which was created by Galleria Dallas Director of Marketing Martha Hinojosa and curator Ken Weber of Vintage Martini, showcases over 100 pieces of vintage couture from the roaring 20’s.

Ken Weber, Ekaterina Kouznetsova, Michael Dylan and Nicholas Moore*

Ken Weber, Ekaterina Kouznetsova, Michael Dylan and Nicholas Moore*

Hinojosa was glad to be able to provide a donation to the Texas Fashion Collection at the University of North Texas as a part of the exhibition. Garments shown at Decadence come from the Susan Denn and Robert Schmidt collection, as well as the Texas Fashion Collection and several smaller private collections. Additionally, Hinojosa was thrilled to be able to make admission to the exhibition free for the public, as a gift back to North Texans with a love of fashion and history.

Naila Malik, Kasey Bell and Natalie Westbrook*

Naila Malik, Kasey Bell and Natalie Westbrook*

Guests at the gala preview were quite impressed at the depth and quality of the exhibition. Fashion luminary Jan Strimple described the exhibit as one of the most important fashion displays in Texas in years. Fashion stylist Dawn Mellon described the collection as being something guests would expect to find at the Louvre or at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Designer Ese Azenabor felt that the exhibition provides a real opportunity for herself and other designers to seek inspiration for future collections.

Venny Etienne, Ashtin Roberston, Charmaine Marshall and Chuck Steelman*

Venny Etienne, Ashtin Roberston, Charmaine Marshall and Chuck Steelman*

Guests enjoyed luxe hors d’oeuvres from The Grill on the Alley while sipping bubbly from period coupes. Couples enjoyed a dance to period music from Matt Tolentino and the Singapore Slingers. Many of the fashionable attendees came in 1920’s inspired costume, and others raced to get photos with models dressed in 1920’s fashions.

* Photos provided by Decadence: Fashions from the 1920's

Interfaith Auxiliary Luncheon Ain’t Fooling Around With April 1st Fundraiser Featuring Hoda Kotb As Keynote Speaker

Friday, April 1, is gonna be ground zero for luncheon fundraisers in North Texas. As has already been posted, Community Partners of Dallas’ Chick Lit 10th Annual Luncheon at the Hilton Anatole will have natty Tim Gunn.

While some may have thought this event would suck all the air out of the lunch rooms, it was revealed that the Interfaith Auxiliary Luncheon is providing an alternative with award-winning journalist Hoda Kotb as the keynote speaker at the Dallas Country Club. Hoda, who was born up the road in Norman, Oklahoma, has gained fame in recent years as being Kathie Lee Gifford’s co-host on NBC’s “Today Show”’s fourth hour.

Amy Hegi (File photo)

Amy Hegi (File photo)

Robyn Conlon (File photo)

Robyn Conlon (File photo)

To add to the event’s hoop-la, Interfaith Auxiliary Luncheon Co-Chairs Amy Hegi and Libby Hegi revealed that former Crystal charity Ball Chairman Robyn Conlon will serve as the luncheon’s honorary chair that will benefit the children served by Interfaith Housing Coalition.

The Coalition “provides transitional housing for working poor families who are experiencing a housing crisis.”

So, don’t wait too long to decide where you’ll be lunching on April Fools’ Day. Both these events have all the signs of being sold out ASAP. Check with Xiomara Ross at 469.828.1806 about getting your place at the Coalition fundraiser.

Parkland Memorial Hospital Chairman Of The Board Of Managers Debbie Branson To Receive 87th Linz Award

Debbie Branson (File photo)

Debbie Branson (File photo)

The Dallas Morning News is reporting that the 87th Linz Award will be presented to Debbie Branson at the Omni Dallas Hotel on Wednesday, April 6.

In addition to being a fourth-generation attorney and involved in various community efforts (Dallas Women’s Foundation, Dallas CASA, UT Dallas Center for Children and Families, etc.), Debbie has served as Parkland Memorial Hospital’s chairman of the board of managers since 2011 and saw it through its dramatic growth and transformation.

Created in 1924 by Linz Jewelers, the award is today sponsored by Signet Jewelers’ Zales Jewelers and The Dallas Morning News but continues to “recognize a Dallas County resident (or couple) in honor of civic service or humanitarian efforts.”

According to Signet Jewelers VP of Corporate Affair David Bouffard, “As a result of her dedicated support, Parkland Hospital now has a significantly higher level of operational and organizational functioning, providing sustained, high-quality care and meaningful services for the community.’

Chaired by Patti Flowers, the luncheon benefits the Junior League of Dallas’ Community Service Fund.

 

Blake D. Lewis III Named Communities In Schools Dallas Region Chairman Of The Board

Caroline Rose Hunt (File photo)

Caroline Rose Hunt (File photo)

Just in time for the Communities in Schools Dallas Region’s Dream Achievers luncheon Thursday honoring Caroline Rose Hunt, it has been announced that Blake D. Lewis III has been named Chairman of the Board. This is big news since this changing-of-the-guard is historic for CSDR. Former ExxonMobil assistant general tax counsel Karl Schmalz has held that position since 2001 and was named Board Member of the Year by the Communities in School Texas in 2007. But don’t go worrying about retiree Karl taking to the couch. He’ll still be an active CISDR board member.

Blake brings “more than 35 years of experience in strategic planning, creative development and media relations in corporate, agency and nonprofit settings.” His Lewis Public Relations has provided “high-level strategy and counsel to a range of organizations, including Alon USA Energy, Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, Texas Farm Bureau and Winzer.”

Blake Lewis III and CISDR student*

Blake Lewis III and CISDR student*

According to CISDR President/CEO Dr. Judith Allen-Bazemore, “Blake has been an integral member of our board. He has strong ties to the local educational community and truly understands the necessity of consistent, evidence-based student services.”

If you haven’t gotten your ticket for the luncheon at the Dallas Arboretum, now is the time to buy. Understand that State Sen. Don Huffines already has his spot at the festivities.

* Photo provided by Communities in Schools Dallas Region

Teaching The Next Generation About Philanthropy Was Made Easy Thanks To The Dallas Foundation’s Family Philanthropy Institute

For some parents, just trying to teach their munchkin how to tie a shoelace or an older kiddo what the word “curfew” means can be harder than getting a hummingbird take a nap. Still another life lesson that seems boggling is getting across the importance of philanthropy to the younger generation and easing them into the process. Luckily, The Dallas Foundation President/CEO Mary Jalonick recognized the quandary and provided just the right venue to help parents and grandparents handle the situation. Here is a report from the field:

Diana and Ward Beaudry and Mary Jalonick*

Diana and Ward Beaudry and Mary Jalonick*

The Dallas Foundation received a gold star from those who attended its annual Family Philanthropy Institute event at Old Parkland last Wednesday, January 20. Nationally-recognized family expert Susan Crites Prites, who has also appeared on NBC’s “Today Show” and “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” shared her expertise in multi-generational philanthropy with attendees.

Susan Crites Price and Toni Garrett*

Susan Crites Price and Toni Garrett*

Susan discussed important facts and valuable advice about how donors can pass on their values and assets to children and grandchildren. She also discussed tips on how to help the next generation of philanthropists spread generosity in the evolving world of both digital and traditional philanthropy.

Susan’s remarks were lively and thought-provoking. “What happens when a kid wants to do a lemonade stand to raise money?” she asked. “They Google it.”

“They have the world in their pocket” in the form of a smartphone, she said. So the goal is for parents or grandparents to be “generosity coaches” to younger members of the family. She offered four tips to make giving a family affair:

  1. Make sure kids mix virtual charity – online research or giving – with real-life experiences. Volunteer together.
  2. Let younger generations teach us how they learn and what the world looks like to them.
  3. If possible, start the conversation about giving when children are young, and keep it going throughout adulthood – but know that it’s never too late to start.
  4. Support your kids’ charitable choices – offer to match their gifts, or give them a sum to donate as they choose.

The Dallas Foundation President and CEO Mary M. Jalonick also spoke at the event, briefly discussing the background of the foundation, including its management of more than 500 separate funds and its almost $300 million in assets. She also noted its leadership in the effort to improve early childhood education in Dallas County and to promote animal welfare in Dallas.

* Photos provided by The Dallas Foundation

JUST IN: 2016 Crystal Charity Beneficiaries Announced

There are tears and cheers being experienced through the area this evening. After a marathon meeting of the Crystal Charity Ball membership with presentations by hopeful nonprofits, the 2016 CCB beneficiaries have just been announced to share in a goal of $5,650,258.

Christie Carter and Claire Emanuelson (File photo)

Christie Carter and Claire Emanuelson (File photo)

The months of coordinating the monumental process of charity selection was supervised by Helen Holman.

The funds will result from the year-long fundraising efforts of the 100 CCB committee members under the leadership of Ball Chair Christie Carter and Underwriting Chair Claire Emanuelson. The 2016 CCB will take place on Saturday, December 3, at the Hilton Anatole.

JUST IN: Dallas Women’s Foundation Maura Women Helping Women And Young Leader Awardees Announced

Word has just been received that the Dallas Women’s Foundation has finalized its plans for its annual Leadership Forum and Awards Dinner, where the 2016 Maura Women Helping Women Award and Young Leader Award are presented.

Presented by AT&T, the dinner will be held on Thursday, April 21, in the Trinity Ballroom at the Omni Dallas Hotel.

Event Co-Chairs Margaret Jordan and Debbie Taylor have arranged for New America President/CEO Anne-Marie Slaughter to be the keynote speaker. Anne-Marie has just had her “Unfinished Business: Women, Men, Work, Family” published “outlining a new vision of work-life balance, and an action plan for achieving true equality between men and women.”

According to Foundation President/CEO Roslyn Dawson Thompson, “The Leadership Forum recognizes outstanding leaders who blazed the trail for women in their industries and communities. These leaders have faced great challenges in their lives and careers, and yet dedicated themselves to creating more opportunities for women and girls to achieve and succeed. It takes courage and a commitment to advance change for women to get in and stay in the leadership pipeline. We are proud to elevate the striking examples our award winners represent, along with the critical insights Anne-Marie’s Slaughter offers, to illuminate ways to broaden pathways to opportunity and build new work cultures that strengthen women, families and communities.”

And now for the news about the awardees. Receiving the 37th annual Maura Women Helping Women Award will be

  • Diana C. Dutton
  • Rabbi Nancy Kasten
  • Vicki Meek
  • Katie Pedigo
  • Billie Bryant Schultz

Presented by Capital One, The Young Leader Awards are presented to women under the age of 40 who have “achieved success in a field, initiative or sector, and are creating a path of opportunity for other women to follow.” This year’s recipients are:

  • Brittany K. Byrd
  • Lacy L. Durham, Esq.

If you’re wondering what makes these ladies so outstanding, grab a cup of coffee, settle back and follow the jump. [Read more…]

Soup’s On! Returns To Union Station With Shows Of Appreciation, News And “The Blind Side’s” Collins Tuohy

The Grape’s Brian Luscher has a very special place in his heart for The Stewpot Alliance. In fact he’s sort of in awe of the organization. He admits that his Greenville Avenue restaurant daily serves 200 guests, while The Stewpot feeds 1,700 a day.

Brian Luscher and Bruce Buchanan

Brian Luscher and Bruce Buchanan

Thanks to Brian’s understanding of the importance of feeding those in need, he has spearheaded the annual Soup’s On! fundraiser for eight years by having the area’s fav chefs serve up bowls of soup.

On Tuesday, January 19, the 2016 group of chefs (Melody Bishop and Dennis Kelley of Lark On the Park, Omar Flores of Casa Rubia, Danyelle McPherson of Remedy, Misti Norris of Small Brewpub, Suki Otsuki of Mudhen, Janice Provost of Parigi, Abraham Salum of Salum and Komali, Sarah Snow of The Grape, Drew Swanson of Wolfgang Puck Catering and Brian Zenner of On Premise) were cooking up hundreds of bowls of soup in the kitchen at Union Station. It was sorta like going home for the chefs like Brian, Omar, Danyelle, Janice and Abraham. Prior to holding the event at the Omni Dallas Hotel the past three years, the event had been at Union Station. And while the Omni had been fine and dandy, Union Station’s charm and history just seemed a fit for the event.

Christi Nicolas, Charlotte Legg and Kristine Schwope

Christi Nicolas, Charlotte Legg and Kristine Schwope

But the sold-out luncheon had added touches that only enchanted the soups served up. For instance, The Stewpot Alliance Board President Kristine Schwope and Luncheon Co-Chairs Charlotte Legg and Christi Nicholas were so very proud of the centerpieces that Terry McCullough and Billye Turner had assembled with produce from the Stewpot Community Gardens.

And then there was the recognition of husband/wife creative team Christy Coltrin and Brad Oldham. Each year Brad has created a unique spoon that is presented to the luncheon chefs. This year the spoon featured the Coltrin-Oldham pooch, Pete. To celebrate the moment Christy and Brad brought along daughter Annabelle Oldham.

Brad Oldham, Annabelle Oldham and Christy Coltrin

Brad Oldham, Annabelle Oldham and Christy Coltrin

Still another star in the crown of the event was having Micki and Mike Rawlings serve as honorary co-chairs. Was it really five years ago when then-Mayor Tom Leppert clasped hands with rumored mayoral candidate Mike at Soup’s On! leading many to think that rumors were more than suspicions?

Harville Hendrix

Harville Hendrix

Helen LaKelly Hunt

Helen LaKelly Hunt

John Phifer Marrs and Lauren Thomasson

John Phifer Marrs and Lauren Thomasson

In the crowd supporting The Stewpot and the co-chairs were Helen LaKelly Hunt and husband Harville Hendrix, who will be orchestrating citywide Safe Conversations on Saturday, February 13… Realtor David Nichols receiving congratulations for being part of the team that closed on the Hicks estate to Andy BealJohn Phifer Marrs and Lauren Thomasson checking the silent auction items… Former Soup’s On! Co-Chair Gail Davis reporting that former Soup’s On! speaker Liz Murray would be back in town at the National Council of Jewish Women luncheon.

As the crowd moved from the reception area to their tables in the ballroom, Brian and his chefs were making last minute checks on their soups.

Suki Otsuki

Suki Otsuki

Cailey Ginn

Cailey Ginn

Bigger-than-life Robert Wilonsky kicked off the program introducing Rev. Joe Clifford to provide the invocation, and Charlotte and Christi told how the soup bowl favors at each guest’s place had been created by a volunteer. This year Shelton student Cailey Ginn was recognized for having painted 100 bowls. At a table in the back of the room, Cailey looked a little surprised at the recognition.

Speaking of surprises, the co-chairs then announced that longtime Alliance supporter Susie Simon had provided $250,000 for an art program at The Stewpot Alliance.

Next up was Honorary Co-Chair Mike (Micki decided to stay at their table and let Mike do the speaking for both of them), who had spent five years working with The Alliance’s Rev. Bruce Buchanan in dealing with “this nemesis.” But despite all the work, he added, “We have a long way to go.” He went on to say that the power of The Alliance “is about not just numbers. It’s about transforming lives.”

Following Christy and Brad being presented on stage for their years of creating the unique spoons presented each year to the chefs and supporting The Stewpot, the chefs were called individually to the stage. Unlike years past, when they had emerged from the center of the back of the room via an open aisle, this year they entered from a side of the back of the room and made their way to the stage through the cluster of tables as servers were delivering the soups. It might have been wiser to have had them simply make a clean entrance of the front side, thereby avoiding the obstacle course of tables.

As the chefs’ names were called out, each was greeted with applause until the end, when Chef Drew was called to take care of a situation. When Drew’s name was called, there was a moment’s hesitation and next-in-line Chef Brian made his way to the stage. But not to worry. Drew returned moments later to take his walk with some guests a little confused as to which one was Drew and which one was Brian. Simple solution — their photos were in the program.

From the left: (back row) Drew Swanson, Suki Otsuki, Brian Zenner, Brian Luscher, Omar Flores, Abraham Salum and Danyele McPherson; (front row) Dennis Kelley, Melody Bishop, Sarah Snow, Janice Provost and Misti Norris

From the left: (back row) Drew Swanson, Suki Otsuki, Brian Zenner, Brian Luscher, Omar Flores, Abraham Salum and Danyele McPherson; (front row) Dennis Kelley, Melody Bishop, Sarah Snow, Janice Provost and Misti Norris

The chefs took their bows and then gathered for the annual group photo. However, this time Brian was a little ginger about his usual “laydown” pose. Perhaps it was that ankle that would soon be meeting up with a doctor’s instruments?

From the left: (back row) Drew Swanson, Suki Otsuki, Brian Zenner, Omar Flores, Abraham Salum and Danyele McPherson; (front row) Dennis Kelley, Melody Bishop, Sarah Snow, Janice Provost and Misti Norris; (horizontal) Brian Luscher

From the left: (back row) Drew Swanson, Suki Otsuki, Brian Zenner, Omar Flores, Abraham Salum and Danyele McPherson; (front row) Dennis Kelley, Melody Bishop, Sarah Snow, Janice Provost and Misti Norris; (horizontal) Brian Luscher

As the meal was winding down, Big Bob returned to the podium to introduce keynote speaker Collins Tuohy. Following a video briefly describing her part in “The Blind Side” life of her family, Collins arrived on stage complete with her southern accent and an impressive engagement ring (she’s getting hitched on April 22 to Cannon Smith, son of FedEx Founder/CEO Fred Smith).

Unlike speakers of the past who talked about the challenges of facing homelessness, Collins told about the other side. The side in which a family takes it upon itself to make a home for a homeless person. She told of little incidents in which big, hulking African-American Michael Oher became part of the white middle-class Tuohy family that provided laughter and understanding. The way she spoke of her “little brother” was no different than the way she talked about the rest of her family. There was humor; there was love; there was a relationship that was blind to his being 290 pounds, black, and coming from a neglected childhood. She was Michael’s big sister and she was dang proud of it.

Regarding the actuality of the movie in which Sandra Bullock won the Academy Award for her portrayal of Tuohy matriarch Leigh Anne Tuohy and Collins was portrayed in the movie by Lily Collins. Collins admitted that she not only didn’t know Lily was the daughter of Phil Collins, upon meeting him she asked, “What group do you play with?”

The movie, according to Collins, “was unbelievably accurate.” One of the few inaccuracies dealt with Collins playing volleyball in the movie. The problem? Collins didn’t play volleyball. She was a pole vaulter and cheerleader. It seems that one day after shooting, Collins spotted Lily with a bruised knee. When she asked how it had happened, Lily said she’d fallen shooting the volleyball scene. Collins reply, “Volleyball?” It was apparent to Lily that Collins was not a volleyball-kind-of gal.

And while the movie and book were dazzling, Collins’ true message of the years that the Tuohys and Michael grew together into a solid family was that, “Someone like Michael could have so easily been overlooked. He is a bashful, bashful person. He could have so easily slipped through the cracks.”

Little did Collins know that she would soon be headed to California to deliver her Whimsy Cookie Co. brother Michael’s Panthers as they play at Super Bowl 50 on Sunday, February 7.

BTW, Leigh Anne will be in town for the Rainbow Days’ Pot of Gold luncheon on Friday, April 15, at Omni Dallas Hotel.

MLK Symposium Carries On Martin Luther King Jr.’s Legacy Through Conversation, Song And Keynote Speaker Teju Cole

Martin Luther King Jr. Day didn’t end with the parade on Monday, January 18. No, The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture settled down at the City Performance Hall for The MLK Symposium “to honor Dr. King’s achievement and legacy, to extend the conversation on civil rights and to promote change and progress in our city.” Here’s a report from the field:

Why do black lives matter? Because they are imperiled, according to Teju Cole, photography editor for The New York Times Magazine, who offered the keynote at The Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture’s 11th Annual MLK Symposium on Monday evening.

Teju Cole and Tiana Johnston*

Teju Cole and Tiana Johnston*

“It’s like when someone says the rainforests are in trouble,” explained Cole. “That doesn’t mean I hate all other forests, it simply means that this particular forest needs a bit of special attention because it is imperiled. That is what black lives matter means.”

Cole’s remarks addressed the event’s theme, “From Birmingham to Charleston: Martin Luther King Jr., and Civil Rights in America”, focusing on America’s progress in ensuring equality under the law and civil rights for all citizens.

The diminutive Cole is at the forefront of a rising chorus of young African-American voices, and has been praised by Salman Rushdie as one of the most gifted writers of his generation. Born in the U.S. in 1975 to Nigerian parents, Cole was raised in Nigeria and is a writer, art historian and photographer, who has also authored two widely acclaimed books, including ‘Every Day is for the Thief, and Open City.’

Shawn Williams, T.J. Vaughn and Larry Allums*

Shawn Williams, T.J. Vaughn and Larry Allums*

Matrice Ellis-Kirk*

Matrice Ellis-Kirk*

The North Dallas Community Bible Fellowship Men in Worship Ensemble opened the event at the City Performance Hall with the Black National Anthem. Dr. Larry Allums, Executive Director of The Dallas Institute, then thanked Matrice Ellis-Kirk, who served as honorary chair, and introduced Mayor Mike Rawlings, to offer welcome remarks.

Cole followed Mayor Rawlings with his thoughtful consideration of the history behind the adversarial relationship between law enforcement and black communities with his “outsider’s” perspective. In this, he discussed the subtleties of American racism with regard to looking “into the beyond” as we progress forward together as humans.

Liz Mikel*

Liz Mikel*

Cole’s speech was followed by a performance of a segment from Dallas Theater Center’s The Mountaintop, performed by Tiana K. Johnston and Sam Henderson. Liz Mikel then led a stirring performance of the song “Glory” from the movie Selma that included Booker T. Washington High School students Rachel Webb, Jada Thomas and Lucki Peterson, with original arrangement by Nathan De’Shon Myers. Both performances were curated by Public City.

The Symposium concluded with a panel discussion, moderated by Dr. Allums that included Cole, Talmadge “T.J.” Vaughns Jr., a W. W. Samuell High School graduate studying entrepreneurship at the University of North Texas University of North Texas at Dallas, Tiana Johnston and the Dallas Police Department’s manager of community engagement, Shawn Williams, who penned an article in this week’s Dallas Morning News called “Black lives matter. Blue lives matter. It’s not a zero sum.”

Afterward, at the book-signing, Mrs. Kirk and her husband, former Mayor Ron Kirk, rushed to buy the last three available books for Cole to sign as others in the line snapped selfies with the approachable Cole, who posed obligingly. He laughed in disbelief when Mrs. Kirk reported one of the daughters he was signing a book for has even seen him walking the streets of New York.

* Photo credit: John Strange